Movies that hold up vs. those that don't

fan of Ray Williams

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Outside of The Wire, Justified is my favorite drama of all-time. It doesn’t have the same acclaim as other shows, but the writing is brilliant, the acting (particularly Oliphant and Walton Goggles as Boyd) as good as it gets and it rides the line between action and humor wonderfully.
Yeah, Iceland turned me on to that series when it was running. Honestly hated to see it end. Loved the characters and thought the dialogue was tremendous.
 

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Finished another 90's movie this week: Wild Things 1998. Denise Richards, Neve Campbell, Matt Dillon, Kevin Bacon, and the guy I forgot was in it...Bill Murray. Much more than just the famous three-way scene. Pretty solid crime thriller overall. Man, the 90's had so many solid movies.
 

WilliamsArenaGuy

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Finished another 90's movie this week: Wild Things 1998. Denise Richards, Neve Campbell, Matt Dillon, Kevin Bacon, and the guy I forgot was in it...Bill Murray. Much more than just the famous three-way scene. Pretty solid crime thriller overall. Man, the 90's had so many solid movies.
I absolutely love that movie and Bill Murray's performance.
 

coolhandgopher

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Finished another 90's movie this week: Wild Things 1998. Denise Richards, Neve Campbell, Matt Dillon, Kevin Bacon, and the guy I forgot was in it...Bill Murray. Much more than just the famous three-way scene. Pretty solid crime thriller overall. Man, the 90's had so many solid movies.
I am in the midst of listening to The Rewatchables most recent podcast regarding What About Bob? and Bill Simmons reflected on what a great year 1991 was for movies, referencing the Box Office Mojo top grossing movies of that year. Personally, it helps that this bridged my freshman/sophomore year.of college, but I saw so many of the movies on this list and would gladly re-watch about 25 on the list (and that's not counting the ones I missed on the first go-round--including #180 on the list, Slacker, Richard Linklater's first movie.

And now I'm nostalgic and wistful for going to a video store and perusing the titles.
 

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I am in the midst of listening to The Rewatchables most recent podcast regarding What About Bob? and Bill Simmons reflected on what a great year 1991 was for movies, referencing the Box Office Mojo top grossing movies of that year.

And now I'm nostalgic and wistful for going to a video store and perusing the titles.
You can come over and search through my collection. Just be kind and rewind.
 


WilliamsArenaGuy

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I am in the midst of listening to The Rewatchables most recent podcast regarding What About Bob? and Bill Simmons reflected on what a great year 1991 was for movies, referencing the Box Office Mojo top grossing movies of that year. Personally, it helps that this bridged my freshman/sophomore year.of college, but I saw so many of the movies on this list and would gladly re-watch about 25 on the list (and that's not counting the ones I missed on the first go-round--including #180 on the list, Slacker, Richard Linklater's first movie.

And now I'm nostalgic and wistful for going to a video store and perusing the titles.
1991 was the zenith in movies AND music.
 



Nokomis

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Finished another 90's movie this week: Wild Things 1998. Denise Richards, Neve Campbell, Matt Dillon, Kevin Bacon, and the guy I forgot was in it...Bill Murray. Much more than just the famous three-way scene. Pretty solid crime thriller overall. Man, the 90's had so many solid movies.
But the three-way scene still holds up too, right?
 





Ope3

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A Few Good Men I would say leans towards the "does not hold up category". I think it's mostly because when you know for sure Nicholson is going to blow a gasket on the witness stand, the payoff is substantially less.

Interesting that Cuba Gooding Jr had a small role as a testifying marine, as a precursor to Rod Tidwell/Jerry Maguire.
 

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With the recent rain I have gone back to the exercise bike and watched the little known late 80's movie, Parents. Still holds up as a creepy, atmospheric film. Randy Quaid plays the dad perfectly. Highly recommend it if you haven't seen it before. Good luck finding it though.
 



Ope3

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Just sort randomly, I had a Robert Redford, behind the lens week watching A River Runs Through It and Ordinary People. SPOILER ALERT - found it interesting that both films there's the thread of families dealing with the death of young adult sons. Both films hold up, big time.

While A River Runs Through It, is not in my Top 10 all time, it's right up there and doubt I can find 25-30 films I like better. I don't even enjoy fishing in the least bit, but that film is just shot so spectacularly it has me wanting to sign up for a trip to Montana and start casting. Along with Once Upon a Time in Hollywood, I think it's one of my favorite Brad Pitt roles. Otherwise great ensemble cast/performances, including Redford's own narration. Even though it's predominantly a somber film, there's a few comedic touches I really enjoy.

Ordinary People, other than Lord of the Rings 3, had the distinction of being the most recent Best Picture Oscar Winner, that I had never seen. I understand why I did not see it as a kid (I was 10 when it was released), but should have found time to watch it sometime this century. What an amazing directorial debut, and everyone in this was great as well. Not good. Great.

Timothy Hutton's performance was Oscar worthy, though not sure why he was in the Supporting Actor category, he seemed to be the main character. I suppose had he been in the Best Actor category, no way he bests DeNiro (Raging Bull). Judd Hirsch's nomination, also well deserved, and I think Donald Sutherland was short changed.

Much has been said of how out of the box picking Mary Tyler Moore was for the mother. Indeed it was. For Mother's Day I got sucked in on some click bait rating TV mothers. I think Laura Petrie got robbed, I would have had her #1. As a cinematic mother, this character may be near the bottom, a true testament her acting range. Quite an about face also from Mary Richards. She might have had better luck if she was in the Supporting Actress category, plus I think she was more of a supporting character. Probably based on the fact she had the most female screen time. Tough to argue with Sissy Spacek getting the trophy for Coal Miner's Daughter as Best Actress.

Lastly, for American directors, if you take Redford's top 3 films (these 2 plus probably Quiz Show) I don't think he has to take a backseat to anyone.

Footnote, I don't ever plan on seeing the LOTR3. First one I was incredibly bored. 2nd one was I think the last time I fell asleep in the the theater, not just a quick nod off, but out like a light midway through. The French Connection is now the most recent Best Picture film that I have not seen, but still plan to watch. I hear that Gene Hackman guy can really act.
 
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Ogee Oglethorpe

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Team America: World Police

A classic movie, and arguably just as relevant and reflective of the current vibe today as it was when it was made. Fantastic movie, start to finish.

"AMERICA!!! F'K YEAH!!"
 

short ornery norwegian

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Ope3: I think "Ordinary People" is a good example of the type of movies that just aren't being made today - or if they are, they're going direct to streaming. 'smaller,' personal movies without a lot of action, and (gasp) plots that make the audience think. It's sad to think that so many great movies, the "The Conservation" with Gene Hackman would never get made today, or would wind up going to Netflix or Hulu instead of a theatrical run.

Hollywood would rather just churn out the 9th sequel to a series where people fight and crash cars into each other.

BTW, speaking of Timothy Hutton, he did a movie called "The Falcon and the Snowman" with Sean Penn, as a pair of buddies who get caught up in a scheme to sell US secrets to the Russians. A really good movie with great performances.
 

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BTW, speaking of Timothy Hutton, he did a movie called "The Falcon and the Snowman" with Sean Penn, as a pair of buddies who get caught up in a scheme to sell US secrets to the Russians. A really good movie with great performances.
Tremendous movie.
 

Ope3

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Ope3: I think "Ordinary People" is a good example of the type of movies that just aren't being made today - or if they are, they're going direct to streaming. 'smaller,' personal movies without a lot of action, and (gasp) plots that make the audience think. It's sad to think that so many great movies, the "The Conservation" with Gene Hackman would never get made today, or would wind up going to Netflix or Hulu instead of a theatrical run.

Hollywood would rather just churn out the 9th sequel to a series where people fight and crash cars into each other.

BTW, speaking of Timothy Hutton, he did a movie called "The Falcon and the Snowman" with Sean Penn, as a pair of buddies who get caught up in a scheme to sell US secrets to the Russians. A really good movie with great performances.

Yeah, to find an Ordinary People (which was a huge box office hit for it's day $90 million) type move, it does take to work to find it. Something very similar in terms of tone, story, performance and even accolades is Marriage Story. For comparison, that did less than $3 million box office, but that is certainly not how Netflix judges it's success.

Glad you mention, The Falcon and the Snowman. I did see that in the theater back in in the day (plus a couple of times since) and agree, great film. I need to revisit it soon. Great soundtrack by Pat Metheny, with Bowie on the end credit track.
 

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Stumbled upon The Heartbreak Kid (1972) on YouTube and watched it this past week and absolutely loved it. The acting-Charles Grodin, Cybil Shepard, Eddie Albert, Grodin's character's wife-is great, the script (Neil Simon play) is witty and funny and some of the scenes are just side-splitting, with a touch of the gravitas that makes me think of The Graduate. A few other comments:
* Shepard in 1972 was luminous-what a beauty. A double feature of this movie and Last Picture Show would be a damn good night of film and Shepard.
* Shepard's character is a U of M co-ed, and about half of the film is shot in MN in the dead of winter, so Ski-U-Mah!
* One of my favorite games in watching movies is "Hey, That's So and So from What's It's Name" and this movie is great for this, especially for TV watchers of a certain age. You have Green Acres and Moonlighting repped by two of the three leads, Mrs. Roper is Albert's wife/Shepard's mom and we get a very brief cameo of a young Doris Roberts, aka Marie Barone of Everybody Loves Raymond (she's Grodin's mother).
 

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* Shepard in 1972 was luminous-what a beauty. A double feature of this movie and Last Picture Show would be a damn good night of film and Shepard.

Triple bill, Taxi Driver?
 


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Just sort randomly, I had a Robert Redford, behind the lens week watching A River Runs Through It and Ordinary People. SPOILER ALERT - found it interesting that both films there's the thread of families dealing with the death of young adult sons. Both films hold up, big time.

While A River Runs Through It, is not in my Top 10 all time, it's right up there and doubt I can find 25-30 films I like better. I don't even enjoy fishing in the least bit, but that film is just shot so spectacularly it has me wanting to sign up for a trip to Montana and start casting. Along with Once Upon a Time in Hollywood, I think it's one of my favorite Brad Pitt roles. Otherwise great ensemble cast/performances, including Redford's own narration. Even though it's predominantly a somber film, there's a few comedic touches I really enjoy.

Ordinary People, other than Lord of the Rings 3, had the distinction of being the most recent Best Picture Oscar Winner, that I had never seen. I understand why I did not see it as a kid (I was 10 when it was released), but should have found time to watch it sometime this century. What an amazing directorial debut, and everyone in this was great as well. Not good. Great.

Timothy Hutton's performance was Oscar worthy, though not sure why he was in the Supporting Actor category, he seemed to be the main character. I suppose had he been in the Best Actor category, no way he bests DeNiro (Raging Bull). Judd Hirsch's nomination, also well deserved, and I think Donald Sutherland was short changed.

Much has been said of how out of the box picking Mary Tyler Moore was for the mother. Indeed it was. For Mother's Day I got sucked in on some click bait rating TV mothers. I think Laura Petrie got robbed, I would have had her #1. As a cinematic mother, this character may be near the bottom, a true testament her acting range. Quite an about face also from Mary Richards. She might have had better luck if she was in the Supporting Actress category, plus I think she was more of a supporting character. Probably based on the fact she had the most female screen time. Tough to argue with Sissy Spacek getting the trophy for Coal Miner's Daughter as Best Actress.

Lastly, for American directors, if you take Redford's top 3 films (these 2 plus probably Quiz Show) I don't think he has to take a backseat to anyone.

Footnote, I don't ever plan on seeing the LOTR3. First one I was incredibly bored. 2nd one was I think the last time I fell asleep in the the theater, not just a quick nod off, but out like a light midway through. The French Connection is now the most recent Best Picture film that I have not seen, but still plan to watch. I hear that Gene Hackman guy can really act.
Just speaking to Ordinary People, it was a great movie--I watched it several times in and around college years, as it aligned closely with my career pathway and so it was a common movie shown in classes. As you said, extraordinary performances all around and I think over the years it has gotten an unfair reputation for being the movie that robbed Raging Bull and Scorcese of Best Picture. While that could be true, it doesn't take away for me what a great character study and movie this was. The author of the novel (Judith Guest) is a long-time resident of Edina.

And I agree with what SoN mentioned regarding these type of movies--they just don't get made by the big studios any more and what a loss it is--this, Kramer vs. Kramer, On Golden Pond, Terms of Endearment, etc. etc. I sure miss em.
 

KD6-3.7

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i know i'm late to the party, but what does "does not hold up" mean?

i watched 48 hours recently and, while there are some n bombs and eddie murphy's character is basically a second class citizen, it was still a great movie.

btw, i also watch another 48 hours and it is one of those 80s movies with kettle drum music that basically encapsulates 80s movies for me.
 



short ornery norwegian

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i know i'm late to the party, but what does "does not hold up" mean?

i watched 48 hours recently and, while there are some n bombs and eddie murphy's character is basically a second class citizen, it was still a great movie.

btw, i also watch another 48 hours and it is one of those 80s movies with kettle drum music that basically encapsulates 80s movies for me.

As I understand it, the discussion on whether a movie "holds up" or does "not hold up" has to do with whether you can watch a movie years later and still enjoy it - as opposed to a movie that looks or feels dated.

Some of this is subjective. there are movies I liked when they came out, but if they're on TV now, I watch 5 minutes and wonder why I liked it in the first place. And then there are movies that I could watch 20, 30 times and still find something I enjoy.
 

Bad Gopher

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Speaking of story- and character-driven movies, The Great Santini is the great movie you've probably never seen...and it holds up very well, of course.

If you'd ask me who my favorite actors are, Robert Duvall is easily in my top 5. He manages to steal the show in practically everything he's in, even in supporting roles (Falling Down, Phenomenon).
 

Ope3

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Speaking of story- and character-driven movies, The Great Santini is the great movie you've probably never seen...and it holds up very well, of course.

If you'd ask me who my favorite actors are, Robert Duvall is easily in my top 5. He manages to steal the show in practically everything he's in, even in supporting roles (Falling Down, Phenomenon).

After watching Ordinary People, I went to find the youtube clip of the Siskel & Ebert review. In the same segment, The Great Santini was reviewed, and got equal raves. Duval was nominated for Best Actor Michael O'Keefe (aka Danny Noonan) lost out to Hutton for Best Supporting Actor.

 

Ope3

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I just re-watched Charlie Wilson's War, for the first time since it was in theater. Did not remember much, found it still entertaining.

Main take-away, is how tragic it is that Philip Seymour Hoffman died so young. In a cast loaded with huge renowned stars, he steals every scene he's in.
 

coolhandgopher

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I just re-watched Charlie Wilson's War, for the first time since it was in theater. Did not remember much, found it still entertaining.

Main take-away, is how tragic it is that Philip Seymour Hoffman died so young. In a cast loaded with huge renowned stars, he steals every scene he's in.
Almost Famous, Doubt, Boogie Nights, The Talented Mr. Ripley (off the top of my head) pop into my head as other movies where he owns the screen whenever he has a scene. As you said, a tragic loss.
 




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