Mike Gundy seemingly admitting to driving under the influence "a thousand times in my life" in defense of star player's DUI arrest.


Yea, people get lucky, people take their chances every night. Some people are not lucky and get killed or go to prison for killing others. In the end, it is no big deal in this country to drive all fu$$$$ up.
 


Gundy is 56 years old and looks every bit of his age—as if he teleported in from the 1970’s. Of course this is par for the course for him and all his prior controversies have done nothing to make him adjust his ways, I doubt this will either.
 

I wonder how many times Stillwater PD has caught him and let him off the hook

He's probably that bass with swollen red lips and a bite out of his tail
 



I think I know what Gundy was trying to say, and it appears he failed.

What would Gundy be referred to as? An enabler?

Not a good look, imho.
 








I think I know what Gundy was trying to say, and it appears he failed.

What would Gundy be referred to as? An enabler?

Not a good look, imho.
Same boat as you. Not a good look at all.

I, too, think I understand what he is trying to say... if I meet up with some friends and have two beers I will drive after that I won't. I have no idea what my BAC is at that point but I know I for sure don't feel like I am drunk/buzzed. I have never taken a breathalyzer in my life so I guess I am taking a gamble.

I have often wondered what my BAC is after a Gopher game. I would say I have 3-4 beers on average while tailgating, none during the game, and then drive home. I should buy a breathalyzer and see what my BAC is before the game and after the game. It would be interesting.
 




I have often wondered what my BAC is after a Gopher game. I would say I have 3-4 beers on average while tailgating, none during the game, and then drive home. I should buy a breathalyzer and see what my BAC is before the game and after the game. It would be interesting.
While you should keep in mind that many factors (e.g., your overall health and metabolism, food consumed, drinking history, etc.) can impact your individual result on any given day, here's a tool that you can use to ballpark it.

BAC Calculator
 

While you should keep in mind that many factors (e.g., your overall health and metabolism, food consumed, drinking history, etc.) can impact your individual result on any given day, here's a tool that you can use to ballpark it.

BAC Calculator
Interesting! Thanks for sharing. According to this calculator, if I have 4 beers tailgating before a 3 hour football game my BAC is around 0% when leaving the stadium.

If I have two beers at happy hour and wait 30 minutes before driving I have 0.005%.

I don't think it will change my steadfast belief of 2 beers and no more, but does help give a peace of mind.
 


not defending drunk driving - but putting in cultural context:

in rural areas, what Gundy is talking about used to be routine. when I was in my late teens and early 20's, my buddies and I would spend nights just driving around and drinking - 4 or 5 guys in a car with a case of beer, tooling around on back roads, just BS'ing.

the cultural attitude was different. then times changed - more attention was given to drunk driving and the penalties for getting arrested got a lot stronger. and the guys in my social circle got older and most of us tried to act more like adults.

but - back in the day, in a rural setting, people would have 4 or 5 beers or mixed drinks, and drive home from the local bar every night of the week. that is what Gundy is talking about.
 

While you should keep in mind that many factors (e.g., your overall health and metabolism, food consumed, drinking history, etc.) can impact your individual result on any given day, here's a tool that you can use to ballpark it.

BAC Calculator
None of that is true. Food consumed, your drinking history, etc has nothing to do with your BAC...it might impact how you physically feel after consuming alcohol or how you perform on field sobriety tests, but BAC is literally how much alcohol is in your bloodstream. The only variables are how much you weigh and how long a period of time you've been drinking that day.
 

None of that is true. Food consumed, your drinking history, etc has nothing to do with your BAC...it might impact how you physically feel after consuming alcohol or how you perform on field sobriety tests, but BAC is literally how much alcohol is in your bloodstream. The only variables are how much you weigh and how long a period of time you've been drinking that day.
I think the idea behind the food consumed argument is that the more food you have in your stomach, the longer it'll be before the alcohol enters the blood since there's other stuff to be processed too. I think I can buy that one.

I agree with you on drinking history though. You'll be just as drunk, the only difference is you'll be familiar with how to deal with it, so you're less likely to fall, etc. as opposed to the first time you got drunk.

Back to the original topic, I was in college at the U of M in the mid to late '90s and it was quite common to drive after drinking. Maybe some of the younger posters on here can elaborate on what it is like now?
 

None of that is true. Food consumed, your drinking history, etc has nothing to do with your BAC...it might impact how you physically feel after consuming alcohol or how you perform on field sobriety tests, but BAC is literally how much alcohol is in your bloodstream. The only variables are how much you weigh and how long a period of time you've been drinking that day.
Yes, it is "literally" how much alcohol is in your bloodstream. But the factors I mentioned impact how quickly that alcohol enters and exits your bloodstream. So two 45 year-old men who each weigh 200 pounds and each consumed six shots of Cuervo an hour ago may not have the exact same BAC. Especially if one has an empty stomach and the other is an experienced drinker with low grade liver failure who just came from an all you can eat buffet. Their bodies will each eventually process all of that alcohol, but that rate that the alcohol is processed is not identical and, therefore, their BAC at any one point in time may not be the same.

Another issue with your overly simplistic analysis is that you, like the online calculators, assume that the alcohol consumption is linear. For example, if our two 45 year-olds consumed their six shots of tequila between noon and 3pm, but one had all six shots by 12:30 and the other took one at noon and then five more at 2pm, they would not have the same BAC at 3:30pm.
 

Back to the original topic, I was in college at the U of M in the mid to late '90s and it was quite common to drive after drinking. Maybe some of the younger posters on here can elaborate on what it is like now?
It was the norm in college in Fargo-Moorhead in the early-mid 90's. Public transportation at bar close was non-existent and college kids didn't have cell phones. I'd guess about half the people I knew ended up with a DWI (or more). I lucked out to be sure.

Drinking and driving is still really common in rural Wisconsin where bar/drinking culture is still the norm, and county-level law enforcement is extremely thin at night, and what there is is more likely to be dealing with domestic incidents, emergency response, than any kind of enforcement.
 

And re: Gundy. He's a good old boy at a good old boy school in a good old boy state that he grew up in. I fail to see why this would surprise anyone.
 

Lawyers out there: if someone refuses a breathelizer (sp) it’s an automatic DWI, right? Also if someone being investigated requests a lawyer are they immediately arrested?
 

Wasn't the alcohol level higher in the past to be considered over the limit?
I also wouldn't be surprised if Gundy has lawyers telling him they can get the charges tossed. Breathalyzer tests are notorious for faulty readings, varying by 20% or more. Get a lawyer to start asking when the testing device was last calibrated and asking the arresting officer of every last detail, when he was certified, etc. A good lawyer can raise enough doubt that charges can be dropped.

Edit: this is not t say that Gundy's remarks were anything but idiotic .
 

Lawyers out there: if someone refuses a breathelizer (sp) it’s an automatic DWI, right? Also if someone being investigated requests a lawyer are they immediately arrested?
Refusing the test at the station isn't an automatic DWI, it's a violation of Minnesota's implied consent law. (Which is based on the idea that, when you apply for a DL in Minnesota, you are consenting to being tested if suspected of driving under the influence.) The result of refusing a field test like a breathalyzer is that you may be arrested on suspicion of DWI and you will be taken "downtown" to be tested. You have the right to consult with a lawyer if you wish before testing.

Requesting to speak to a lawyer before you are arrested should not impact whether you are arrested, but I am sure that, as a practical matter, that does sometimes happen. Most often, it probably just speeds up the process since the officer planning to arrest you may delay that arrest as long as possible to continue to gather information. Once you ask to talk to a lawyer, and are no longer giving up information, the arrest occurs. That might make it seem like the request prompted the arrest, but in those circumstances you were probably going to be arrested at the end of the communication anyway.
 
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Lawyers out there: if someone refuses a breathelizer (sp) it’s an automatic DWI, right? Also if someone being investigated requests a lawyer are they immediately arrested?
I'm not a lawyer, but I'm 100% certain that refusal is considered the same as a positive test. As for your second question, requesting a lawyer just means you won't talk/be interrogated without one, has nothing to do with being arrested or not (i.e asking for a lawyer will not change whether you get arrested or not, nor will it change whether the cop asks you to blow into the breathalyzer or not).
 


Yea, people get lucky, people take their chances every night. Some people are not lucky and get killed or go to prison for killing others. In the end, it is no big deal in this country to drive all fu$$$$ up.
It’s like it is 1983!
 

Yea, people get lucky, people take their chances every night. Some people are not lucky and get killed or go to prison for killing others. In the end, it is no big deal in this country to drive all fu$$$$ up.
I don’t think you are following the trends in this country if you think it is no big deal. The laws have tightened and enforcement is at an all time high.

Now driving under the influence of other substances is essentially being given a free pass and at an epidemic level.
 




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