Florida Gator QB signee wants release after $13MM NIL deal falls through

GopherTheJugular

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I don’t know if any gopher athletes have anything to worry about.

How would any of us know?
Well, I haven't heard of anything related to a Gopher's NIL from Dinkytown Athletes not being given to them, have you?

From what I know about Dinkytown Athletes, I think it's reasonably safe to assume the Gopher athletes don't have to worry like this Florida kid does about getting a shady deal.
 

Gophergrandpa

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For me, I have no sympathy for him because it wasn't a legit NIL deal. Bryce Young doing the Dr Pepper commercials was a legit NIL deal. This kid tried to get involved in pay for play and it didn't work out. Well, it was never supposed to work out like that, so tough cookies for him.

Do you actually know if there was a contract?
As somebody remarked, these kids are unsophisticated and trusting, and in most cases probably without legal advice, but … for the cooperative to have a legal problem, there doesn’t need to have been an actual contract signed up. If the kid signed a commitment with Florida based on the oral promise of a collective representative that there was a $13M NIL contract lurking behind door No. 1., and that the contract would be signed up, etc., as soon as Rashada committed in writing, that would be enough. If Reshada committed and the promised contract wasn’t actually there, then there was “fraudulent inducement” that Reshada relied upon to his distinct detriment. This is enough to get the collective in a bad lawsuit.

As somebody else remarked, this NIL stuff is so new that there are no trustworthy guideposts, no established practices of custom and dealing, no agreed upon “best practices,” no form contracts such as those the major professional leagues use, no players’ union to keep an eye on the boosters. It is a sh!t show.

The Gophers in a sense are lucky that, because they aren’t really in the running for the top few dozen HS and transfer players, they aren’t going to be dragged into the “deep end” of the NIL bidding cesspool. The Gophers are actually using NIL as it was intended. 😇
 

Cedar Rapids Gopher

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As somebody remarked, these kids are unsophisticated and trusting, and in most cases probably without legal advice, but … for the cooperative to have a legal problem, there doesn’t need to have been an actual contract signed up. If the kid signed a commitment with Florida based on the oral promise of a collective representative that there was a $13M NIL contract lurking behind door No. 1., and that the contract would be signed up, etc., as soon as Rashada committed in writing, that would be enough. If Reshada committed and the promised contract wasn’t actually there, then there was “fraudulent inducement” that Reshada relied upon to his distinct detriment. This is enough to get the collective in a bad lawsuit.

As somebody else remarked, this NIL stuff is so new that there are no trustworthy guideposts, no established practices of custom and dealing, no agreed upon “best practices,” no form contracts such as those the major professional leagues use, no players’ union to keep an eye on the boosters. It is a sh!t show.

The Gophers in a sense are lucky that, because they aren’t really in the running for the top few dozen HS and transfer players, they aren’t going to be dragged into the “deep end” of the NIL bidding cesspool. The Gophers are actually using NIL as it was intended. 😇
I actually think all schools are using NIL the wrong way. I have donated to a couple nil for the Gophers. But am I paying players or am I getting a benefit from a nil. I currently don't own a business so nil doesn't really benefit me except try to get some cash in players hands.
 

MNVCGUY

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I actually think all schools are using NIL the wrong way. I have donated to a couple nil for the Gophers. But am I paying players or am I getting a benefit from a nil. I currently don't own a business so nil doesn't really benefit me except try to get some cash in players hands.
Suppose it all depends how it is setup. If you donated to the collective and then the collective used that money to pay players for legit NIL opportunities it would be being used the way NIL is intended to be used.

Honestly the area where these phony NIL deals get dicey is when it involves recruits. Recruits are unlikely to garner a lot of legit NIL opportunities until they have proven they can compete at the next level. These big sums being tossed at high schoolers are nearly always going to be pay for play to get a commitment.
 




Gophergrandpa

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Here is an excerpt from an ESPN article about the Jaden Rashada NIL fiasco. It discusses what NIL collectives are supposed to do (which the Gopher Collective does) and what many aggressive booster/bagman type collectives (cough cough, SEC) actually do:

“In theory, collectives are booster groups that collect funds to pay athletes who are already attending the school they support. In practice, many of the more aggressive collectives have become outsourced payroll outfits that are used to unofficially entice players to attend their school.”
 

Allshade

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I actually think they can have an agent specifically for NIL reasons but that agent can't represent them from a professional sports standpoint. How many actually go this route...I have no clue.

But yeah, I am sure there are a lot of parents and other people out there working on deals that may or may not end up being legit. I would bet there are also a lot of false promises or bait and switch situations to entice kids to sign.
FWIW, I know an agent who reps pro players and claims to also work on NIL deals. Perhaps you can do both.
 







A_Slab_of_Bacon

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So the schools, coaches, or NCAA hold no responsibility for NIL? Are the coaches no longer recruiting, just boosters?
Yes

The situation exists because SCOTUS decided that you can’t prevent these people from participating in NIL deals.

You could promise money, I can promise money…. both the school or NCAA can do to stop us from making promises.
 




upnorthkid

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So the schools, coaches, or NCAA hold no responsibility for NIL? Are the coaches no longer recruiting, just boosters?
The coaches are still recruiting. They just can’t offer specific nil deals or have a hand in it. Contingent on the athlete to make the best choice for them. It’s the free market people are saying is best 🤷🏻‍♂️
 

GopherWeatherGuy

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Yes

The situation exists because SCOTUS decided that you can’t prevent these people from participating in NIL deals.

You could promise money, I can promise money…. both the school or NCAA can do to stop us from making promises.

I get that, but it’s still up to the coaches to do their due diligence on the players they are recruiting, and what they are receiving for NIL. Do you truly believe the Florida coaching staff landed a highly rated QB and had no idea the amount of $$$ he was being offered?

Coaches knowing what kind of NIL package they can offer is a huge part of recruiting now. It was prior to it becoming ‘legal’ too, especially in the SEC.
 

matt

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The coaches are still recruiting. They just can’t offer specific nil deals or have a hand in it.
You can’t jaywalk either but people still do that all the time. Klatt is clearly assuming that the Gators had a hand in the NIL deal or otherwise used it as a reason that Jaden should commit to Florida. I don’t know if Florida did that or not, but I have a hard time believing that every P5 program is in compliance with that rule.
 

upnorthkid

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I get that, but it’s still up to the coaches to do their due diligence on the players they are recruiting, and what they are receiving for NIL. Do you truly believe the Florida coaching staff landed a highly rated QB and had no idea the amount of $$$ he was being offered?

Coaches knowing what kind of NIL package they can offer is a huge part of recruiting now. It was prior to it becoming ‘legal’ too, especially in the SEC.
I mean they can’t fund any NIL group and I don’t think they can speak directly to deals. Also, it would sure appear no one in the know about the deal had any idea what they were offering, given the group is saying they don’t have that money. It’s going to tank that NIL group and hurt Floridas recruiting. The coach isn’t going to want that. They can only “advise” Then about NIL opportunities.

Maybe they knew and maybe they didn’t. But the way the rule is written right now the onus is on the athlete to educate themselves on the opportunities and tax implications and the NCAA has stayed out of this one as they have no power over this other then to make recommendations.

I think it will be real interesting to see where it goes. What requires any NIL group to negotiate in good faith more than it is for you or I? They can offer whatever. What’s to stop the QB to say I’m not playing after he cashes his check? The deal was for his NIL, not his play on the field right?

Clearly this isn’t well legislated or even well thought out to this point given the nuance and you’re going to see cases like this be flashpoints. Problem is that no one has the power here who can make rapid decisions because of the prior rulings
 

A_Slab_of_Bacon

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I get that, but it’s still up to the coaches to do their due diligence on the players they are recruiting, and what they are receiving for NIL. Do you truly believe the Florida coaching staff landed a highly rated QB and had no idea the amount of $$$ he was being offered?

Coaches knowing what kind of NIL package they can offer is a huge part of recruiting now. It was prior to it becoming ‘legal’ too, especially in the SEC.
I actually think it is very likely some NIL group is making offers that their donors can cover… as for who else knows the numbers I don’t think it matters.


If they didn’t tell the money men… I bet a lot of people didn’t know / have no way to know until it is too late.
 


Bob_Loblaw

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I actually think it is very likely some NIL group is making offers that their donors can cover… as for who else knows the numbers I don’t think it matters.

If they didn’t tell the money men… I bet a lot of people didn’t know / have no way to know until it is too late.
It matters if they used that knowledge as incentive for the kid to commit.

The relationship between the NIL collective and Florida is so entangled, a reasonable person would have to think they were connected. I would suspect there is considerable evidence that would come to light if this kind of breach of contract case ever made it to discovery.
 

MNVCGUY

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I get that, but it’s still up to the coaches to do their due diligence on the players they are recruiting, and what they are receiving for NIL. Do you truly believe the Florida coaching staff landed a highly rated QB and had no idea the amount of $$$ he was being offered?

Coaches knowing what kind of NIL package they can offer is a huge part of recruiting now. It was prior to it becoming ‘legal’ too, especially in the SEC.
Everyone is walking a fine line with the NIL deals. No doubt the schools are aware of what is being offered to recruits and using it to their advantage when recruiting those athletes. At the same time, specifically because of situations like this one, the school also has to be careful to keep some level of separation from the collectives so that they don't get drawn into the disputes that are going to happen when money falls through or doesn't reach the promised levels.
 

GopherTheJugular

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What’s to stop the QB to say I’m not playing after he cashes his check? The deal was for his NIL, not his play on the field right?
Now that would be funny if a bunch did that and then left for another school. Like Texas A&M's 2022 class, just take that money and head to Georgia lol.
 

short ornery norwegian

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There are 131 FBS football teams. There are 358 D1 college basketball teams.

How many enforcement officials does the NCAA have?

If there were only (let's say) 10 State Troopers enforcing speed limits on all MN freeways, how many people would voluntarily drive the speed limit - knowing that their chances of being stopped and ticketed were virtually nil?

that is what we have now with major college sports and NIL.

when there are no cats, the mice will play......and pay.......and tamper.....

if the NCAA wants to act like a real enforcement body, they need to take some of their revenues and hire a shite load of new enforcement officials.........assuming they want to.
 


A_Slab_of_Bacon

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Right now I would guess "none". But I think you are making an assumption here. I don't think the NCAA is so busy with current enforcement that they can't take on new stuff. Instead, they're just choosing to stand on the sidelines.
NCAA is busy delaying doing anything because Jim Harbaugh just wouldn't admit he did a thing ... they seem pretty absurd ...
 

Pompous Elitist

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There are 131 FBS football teams. There are 358 D1 college basketball teams.

How many enforcement officials does the NCAA have?


If there were only (let's say) 10 State Troopers enforcing speed limits on all MN freeways, how many people would voluntarily drive the speed limit - knowing that their chances of being stopped and ticketed were virtually nil?

that is what we have now with major college sports and NIL.

when there are no cats, the mice will play......and pay.......and tamper.....

if the NCAA wants to act like a real enforcement body, they need to take some of their revenues and hire a shite load of new enforcement officials.........assuming they want to.

Maj. Eaton : We have top men working on it right now.

Indiana : Who?

Maj. Eaton : Top... men.
 

Goldmember

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The NCAA’s “self-enforcement” model clearly no longer works. It’s probably never did work. But it is is just ridiculously broken at this point.

But the member institutions are not going to agree to pay the shockingly high cost of implementing a real governance model (all so that they can face greater scrutiny). The member institutions are also not going to give up the autonomy they currently enjoy (and submit to an NFL model).
 




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