Ticket question

tikited

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I received some helpful advice here in regard to getting tickets on the street at the begining of the season. I haven't had to pay more than $10 a ticket for three games so far, but last night we were shut-out.

It seemed like an entirely different scene in front of the stadium with scalpers demanding up to $50 for less than good seats. Not sure if they were just trying to rip-off SD fans or what, but my question is about the guys who are looking for tickets (you know the ones who carry the little signs, "I Need Tickets").

As we walked back to the bar I noticed a few of these guys still walking around with their signs. This was probably a good 15 minutes after tip-off. Could someone explain what this is all about? Why do they want tickets after the game has started? They obviously aren't going to the game. Are they hoping to get future game tickets? We just couldn't figure it out. Sorry if there is an obvious answer-I'm just not seeing it.

Oh, Happy Holidays to all Gopher Holers!!
 

UptownMaroon&Gold

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As far as I know, that means they still have some for sale, and are trying to hit up desperate late-comers. I am not sure if you asked them what they had for sale or not, but I don't think at that point they are really trying to buy more tickets, they are trying to get rid of what they have.
 

tikited

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As far as I know, that means they still have some for sale, and are trying to hit up desperate late-comers. I am not sure if you asked them what they had for sale or not, but I don't think at that point they are really trying to buy more tickets, they are trying to get rid of what they have.

Thanks for the reply.

I did ask a few of them if they had tickets to sell and they all said no-they were only looking to buy. I didn't go as far to ask them what their strategy was though.
 

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Most of them are working together. I got to the game about 3 hours prior and the buyers and sellers were talking to each other in person and over CB radio trying to cover the area. Following this one of the individuals proudly declared "Man I need a blunt!". As a business student I can't see how that strategy is very profitable, but apparently they've figured something out.
 

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Most of them are working together. I got to the game about 3 hours prior and the buyers and sellers were talking to each other in person and over CB radio trying to cover the area. Following this one of the individuals proudly declared "Man I need a blunt!". As a business student I can't see how that strategy is very profitable, but apparently they've figured something out.

They work together and set prices high so none of the scalpers undercut each other. By setting a minimum price (i.e $50 for upper deck, $75 lower deck, $90 chairbacks) all of the scalpers guarantee they will get as much money as possible per ticket without having to worry about competing with each other. Of course there are people that just have extras they sell at face value, but those people are harder to find as they don't stand at the corner and often just sell their tickets to scalpers who flip tem. I will say as somebody that scalps frequently it does make finding tickets at a reasonable price much more difficult, I don't remember them working together as much even 2 or 3 years ago. You have to look a lot harder to find something or know season ticket holders.

On that note, I am trying to find some tickets for the Purdue, Illinois, MSU, or OSU game as a last minute Christmas present. I'd prefer chairbacks if possible, send me a PM if you have something.
 


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My experiences have always rewarded patience, except once instance early in the Wild's existence when I was literally left in the cold with 10 other people standing around one scalper waiting for someone fold when the puck had already dropped.

It becomes a buyers market really quick 15 minutes prior to game time. I rarely get in before player introductions. The best deals I've gotten involved intercepting people approaching scalpers, did that twice already this year. Also got great seats at 1/2 price via last minute on craigslist meeting someone in the suburbs last year.

Need tickets signs might have been for the Wisconsin game next week. I've seen people sell future games to scalpers before games.
 

CrocShots

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They work together and set prices high so none of the scalpers undercut each other. By setting a minimum price (i.e $50 for upper deck, $75 lower deck, $90 chairbacks) all of the scalpers guarantee they will get as much money as possible per ticket without having to worry about competing with each other. Of course there are people that just have extras they sell at face value, but those people are harder to find as they don't stand at the corner and often just sell their tickets to scalpers who flip tem. I will say as somebody that scalps frequently it does make finding tickets at a reasonable price much more difficult, I don't remember them working together as much even 2 or 3 years ago. You have to look a lot harder to find something or know season ticket holders.

On that note, I am trying to find some tickets for the Purdue, Illinois, MSU, or OSU game as a last minute Christmas present. I'd prefer chairbacks if possible, send me a PM if you have something.

They're working together? Part of scalping 101 is using them against each other. I got 2 student tix for the Iowa football game at Kinnick for 10 bucks a piece by playing the guys.
 

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They're working together? Part of scalping 101 is using them against each other. I got 2 student tix for the Iowa football game at Kinnick for 10 bucks a piece by playing the guys.

I don't know if every scalper works together, but most of them do. They understand it is to their benefit to work together.
 

akgopher

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I don't know if every scalper works together, but most of them do. They understand it is to their benefit to work together.

My experiences point to them working together with prices being fairly consistent. As I stated above all deals are off 15 minutes prior to game time and it becomes everyman for himself as the stacks in their hands get liquidated. I dislike going to games with jumpy people wanting to have a ticket in their hands an hour before the game, 1/2 hour really hurts because you know in 15 minutes that ticket really drops and a good chance it's still in the scalper's hand.
 



anticallihan

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My experiences point to them working together with prices being fairly consistent. As I stated above all deals are off 15 minutes prior to game time and it becomes everyman for himself as the stacks in their hands get liquidated. I dislike going to games with jumpy people wanting to have a ticket in their hands an hour before the game, 1/2 hour really hurts because you know in 15 minutes that ticket really drops and a good chance it's still in the scalper's hand.

Like the previous poster said. They not only work together to set prices, but they will do what they can to undercut the individual scalper. This forces the individuals to sell to them (the scalpers).

I would say all in all our scalpers are not nearly as sophisticated as I have seen at other schools, especially in Michigan. I have seen systems where one guy holds all the good seats, and will come via a bike no matter what scalper you are talking to after a call.

I think the real art is upgrading your seats through a scalper. That can be difficult.
 

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AKGopher has it right...
The regular scalpers all know who each other are and have their own "code of ethics" amongst the thieves that they will not steal someone else's "customer", thus they do work together a bit. They know they will see the same guys at every event and would prefer to all get along and all make a buck if possible. I don't believe they are smart enough to conspire to inflate prices. You have to be willing to haggle and walk away from a scalper and try the next guy. However, keep in mind that their worst scenerio is to be stuck with any tickets as they walk away from the event so they will sell at most any cost 15-20 minutes after tip off. Patience is the key. If you need to be in your seat 20-30 minutes prior to the start and hear the national anthem, it will likely cost you twice the price from the scalper for that luxury. The guys looking for tickets 10-15 minutes after tip off will only give you 5-10% of the face value in hopes of selling to the late arriver that will pay 30-40% of face because he is late. They all know the types of crowds they are dealing with and don't get stuck too often with valuable tickets in their pockets. We got to two different Twins games in the top of the 2nd ining against the White Sox and Yankees and sat in seats that were selling earlier in the day for $125-150 ( 5 rows from the field at 3rd base) per seat and paid $30-$40 per ticket both times. There are cheap tickets available for almost every game if you are patient.
 

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Do those guys - at Gopher b-ball games - really make enough to make it worth the time? What a bunch of Mickey Mousing around. Go to school, study computers, sit behind a desk, sip coffee and surf the internet - in 70 degree comfort.
 

akgopher

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Do those guys - at Gopher b-ball games - really make enough to make it worth the time? What a bunch of Mickey Mousing around. Go to school, study computers, sit behind a desk, sip coffee and surf the internet - in 70 degree comfort.

It's probably a side gig and in most cases, they do at least X2 for what they paid compared to what they get for the seat. I remember a few years ago a scalper did X4 on a single Twins playoff ticket I sold for face value to a scalper on the street.
 



GopherJake

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It's probably a side gig and in most cases, they do at least X2 for what they paid compared to what they get for the seat. I remember a few years ago a scalper did X4 on a single Twins playoff ticket I sold for face value to a scalper on the street.

No, I realize it's a side-gig. And yes, there are situations where you can rake in the $$, obviously.

But those same guys were out there during the Monson years selling tickets for Gophers v. Northeast Hypen State A & M, standing in -50 windchill selling tickets for $6. I could barely stand the walk from my car to the Arena. No thanks. I'll take my desk job.
 




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