The Division I Council is recommending that the NCAA get rid of the “one-time” part of its transfer rule. Anyone would be able to transfer.



Gophers_4life

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Can someone let me know in which professional league are players allowed to break their contracts with team, any year they want, on any whim they want?

That's the exact equivalent of these "free" transfers.

Makes for a s__ty product.


What a bunch of stupid a__holes. Good grief
 

Bob_Loblaw

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Can someone let me know in which professional league are players allowed to break their contracts with team, any year they want, on any whim they want?

That's the exact equivalent of these "free" transfers.

Makes for a s__ty product.


What a bunch of stupid a__holes. Good grief
It also absolutely destroys and illusion that these are student athletes.

I love college sports so I hate to say it but the marriage between lucrative professional minor league system and an education was always an odd match, so it feels like it was always destined to fail. In theory, the idea that college athletes couldn't collect on their name, image or likeness doesn't make sense. However, in practice, it might destroy the very thing that makes their NIL valuable.

I strongly believe that part of the reason why it is so lucrative is because of the tie in to the universities. I'm much more likely to watch a random Mountain West football game than I am an XFL game.
 
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Gophers_4life

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I don't even think it matters so much about NIL, though obviously I can see that getting a bigger/better NIL contract is a strong incentive to transfer.

Though technically the athlete isn't supposed to be able to even know that those bigger contracts are waiting for them at school X. That's inducement and it's supposed to be against the rules. Yeah, right.


If they had to sit out a year, that would take some starch out of it. In Bucky to Oregon case, probably not, since he probably won't play much this year. But they obviously think he's a strong prospect, which he of course proved last year.
 



leib0039

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The argument is always "well a coach can pick up and leave when he/she wants so why can't players". That is true, but the coach also has a buyout to pay if he/she wants out.

I wonder if there are a few things that might happen, make scholarships 1 year deals (yes I know technically they are now), fine if you want to be able to leave thats ok, but hey bench guy sorry you are cut, we dont care if you like it or not. On the NIL front I wonder if things arent built in where these kids pay back things if they leave a school. Lets say booster x has a kid getting $300k a year, but if they leave after 1 year they owe $150k of that back as the booster/business did not get the full effect they had anticipated.

I dont necessarily have an issue with NIL or kids being able to transfer every year, BUT I think it is also fair to put more responsibility on them. You no longer want to be a "student-athlete" and more of a pro, cool, but then what is expected of you is significantly higher.
 

Gophers1992

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I've heard a theory that the NCAA has their feelings hurt over getting slammed by the Supreme Court over NIL so now they are going to intentionally let everything burn. I've always thought it was a silly theory but things like this make it seem plausible.
 

cjbfbp

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I love college sports so I hate to say it but the marriage between lucrative professional minor league system and an education was always an odd match, so it feels like it was always destined to fail.

Agreed. For some reason this country decided to go down that path while most other nations did not. You can see very good players entering the NBA from Europe who developed quite well without our system.
 



cjbfbp

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I've heard a theory that the NCAA has their feelings hurt over getting slammed by the Supreme Court over NIL so now they are going to intentionally let everything burn.

I don't see this issue that way. I think they are just sick of dealing with restrictive rules that are becoming increasingly difficult to enforce when the transfer pool gets as large as it is now. Transferring during the 2021 offseason was basically a free-for-all. The NCAA really didn't have much choice but to waive them through. Sticking by the rules would have created an untenable situation. I've seen plenty of BB transfers this offseason that are transferring for the second or third time. The NCAA can continue to deal with this via the waiver procedures but that will probably just result in countless questionable waivers.
 

Holy Man

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I don't see this issue that way. I think they are just sick of dealing with restrictive rules that are becoming increasingly difficult to enforce when the transfer pool gets as large as it is now. Transferring during the 2021 offseason was basically a free-for-all. The NCAA really didn't have much choice but to waive them through. Sticking by the rules would have created an untenable situation. I've seen plenty of BB transfers this offseason that are transferring for the second or third time. The NCAA can continue to deal with this via the waiver procedures but that will probably just result in countless questionable waivers.
Less restrictions on transfers (i.e. one time in four years) is one thing. Eliminating restrictions all together is quite another. The one time feature reduces the need to review endless number of cases each year. I know no details, but my guess is this is a battle between the haves and have nots of college sports, with the haves seeing it to their benefit that have nots provide a farm system for them. Seems like another step toward two to four money leagues going their own way, while the rest return to college sports as a healthy extra curricular, with real students competing.

I still think the biggest losers will be the players who will have fewer scholarship opportunities and are encouraged to jump at the first sign of adversity.
 

Powder

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Is it possible scholarships will go away all together? If kids are getting paid through NIL, why are the schools providing scholarships at all? Make the kids pay their own way.

I think it could be an either/or situation. Take the NIL and pay your own way or no NIL and we'll give you a scholarship.
 

short ornery norwegian

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the key could be the part about "meeting academic standards."

who sets the standards, and who decides whether they have been met?

If I want to transfer from State U to College X, does State U have to make a declaration that I met their academic standards, or does College X make that declaration? In other words, could State U block my transfer by claiming that I did not meet academic standards?

I could see some desperate school setting really low academic standards that would allow anyone to transfer in, no matter if they were flunking basket-weaving.

at that point, why even try to maintain the pretense of the "student-athlete?" just make them employees of the school.
 




stocker08

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For anyone wondering....the D1 Council is just a random group of 40 chuds. I cannot imagine the majority of schools liking this idea....I cannot see how the NCAA would look at this as anything other than terrible for the product.

 

Gophers_4life

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I've heard a theory that the NCAA has their feelings hurt over getting slammed by the Supreme Court over NIL so now they are going to intentionally let everything burn. I've always thought it was a silly theory but things like this make it seem plausible.
Well, you might be onto something, though.

Maybe the intention isn't to let it burn .... but the intention could be to make fans so angry that it forces the hand of Congress to make a national law?

That is what the NCAA has been begging for, since NIL was forced upon them (by California, to start).
 

Gophers_4life

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Is it possible scholarships will go away all together? If kids are getting paid through NIL, why are the schools providing scholarships at all? Make the kids pay their own way.

I think it could be an either/or situation. Take the NIL and pay your own way or no NIL and we'll give you a scholarship.
I think the issue there is that most student-athletes (think about all the non football, non basketball, women's sports, etc.) won't make anywhere near enough NIL to pay the equivalent of the benefits provided under a full scholarship
 


forever a gopher

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They should be going the other direction. NIL and the transfer portal has been a net negative on college sports. In theory I don't have an issue with giving kids more flexibility to leave and getting paid for NIL. But NIL went from cashing in on getting paid to sign some memorabilia to just straight-up getting paid by the schools in a few months. What it is is no longer "Name/Image/Likeness", it's just a paycheck. Likewise, the transfer thing is a disaster. I'm OK with one-free transfer, but that's all you get. No other "my best friend's mom's dog is sick, so I need to transfer home" transfer exceptions. (i.e. a guy like Dawson Garcia has to sit a year, even if you have a legit reason). You can transfer a second time, but you gotta sit. I'm fine with giving everybody 6 years if they transfer a second time too (i.e. giving you 6 years to play 4) in addition to an injury redshirt. But free transfers anytime is a total disaster waiting to happen.
 

howeda7

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They should be going the other direction. NIL and the transfer portal has been a net negative on college sports. In theory I don't have an issue with giving kids more flexibility to leave and getting paid for NIL. But NIL went from cashing in on getting paid to sign some memorabilia to just straight-up getting paid by the schools in a few months. What it is is no longer "Name/Image/Likeness", it's just a paycheck. Likewise, the transfer thing is a disaster. I'm OK with one-free transfer, but that's all you get. No other "my best friend's mom's dog is sick, so I need to transfer home" transfer exceptions. (i.e. a guy like Dawson Garcia has to sit a year, even if you have a legit reason). You can transfer a second time, but you gotta sit. I'm fine with giving everybody 6 years if they transfer a second time too (i.e. giving you 6 years to play 4) in addition to an injury redshirt. But free transfers anytime is a total disaster waiting to happen.
We're literally rooting for laundry now. The players may be the dog that caught the car here.
 

gopherguy15

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Some men just want to watch the world burn...

It's not even slowly at this point. College basketball as we know it is getting destroyed very quickly. Ugh.
 



Face The Facts

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Reason why they are taking away the restriction is so they don't get sued. With the current state of anything, you can't restrict players from transferring whenever the hell they want. It's federal law, not NCAA. NCAA needs to loosen up to not get sued.

In other news, the Big Ten will start paying players soon and have them on contract where they can stipulate whatever rules they want because they are employees.
 

Gophers_4life

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Reason why they are taking away the restriction is so they don't get sued. With the current state of anything, you can't restrict players from transferring whenever the hell they want. It's federal law, not NCAA. NCAA needs to loosen up to not get sued.

In other news, the Big Ten will start paying players soon and have them on contract where they can stipulate whatever rules they want because they are employees.
No one was ever "restricting" or preventing any player from transferring to any school, at any time they wanted.

They always could. Knock yourself out.


Disagree that just because you came up, on any whim, with a reason that you felt you needed to transfer, then means you should be immediately eligible to play for the new school's team.


Those are entirely separate concepts.
 

Some guy

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Reason why they are taking away the restriction is so they don't get sued. With the current state of anything, you can't restrict players from transferring whenever the hell they want. It's federal law, not NCAA. NCAA needs to loosen up to not get sued.

In other news, the Big Ten will start paying players soon and have them on contract where they can stipulate whatever rules they want because they are employees.
I believe that is the way it is going
 

howeda7

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In other news, the Big Ten will start paying players soon and have them on contract where they can stipulate whatever rules they want because they are employees.
Does Clarence Thomas find this acceptable? That's all that matters....
 




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