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ottertail

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I don't think OTLCA is government. It's an association.
Correct. Non-profit.
Just found it very interesting.
However the guy who runs it is a County employee (as are some of their board) and I assume most of their funds come from the County as well.
 


upnorthkid

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Heard about this and didn't see it posted anywhere. I like the idea of knowing exactly where the money is going.
I mean it's hard to say if it's helping for what they claim it is (keeping guys around) versus just a nice fundraising method for a team that already has astronomically deep pockets. That being said, wonder if it's against Big Ten rules to put some things into place to help each University develop this type of thing with their alumni association/group? Having NIL collectives is going to be key going forward and would put them ahead in the arms race
 

MonikerSchmoniker45

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I mean it's hard to say if it's helping for what they claim it is (keeping guys around) versus just a nice fundraising method for a team that already has astronomically deep pockets. That being said, wonder if it's against Big Ten rules to put some things into place to help each University develop this type of thing with their alumni association/group? Having NIL collectives is going to be key going forward and would put them ahead in the arms race
Good points. I would think the players being mentioned to "stay another year" are aware of the funds being attained by this specific fundraiser and expect it in their pockets.
 


Gopher_In_NYC

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UpAndUnder43

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hello-world

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Dinkytown Athletes NIL collective has less than a day left in their (2) 50k matching campaigns. If you have even considered becoming a Dinkytown Athletes member or supporting them, it is quite literally the best time to do so!

Here are a few reasons to become a Dinkytown Athletes member:
- Cool perks like signed balls, invites to exclusive events with players, and exclusive content like interviews with the players.
- Helps get top talent to Dinkytown and avoids the "Bucky Irving effect" where great future players transfer somewhere like Oregon because they offered him 300k...
- Puts Minnesota on the map!

Dinkytown Athletes

Here is the link to become a member or donate! Go Gophs!
Y'all ain't gonna get it done on individual donations. Go out and talk to businesses. The phrase NIL should tell you exactly what you need to do. Get out and use their Name-Image-and-Likeness to drum up business in MSP.

Get the o-line on a moving company's billboard, get the d-line eating BBQ at Famous Daves, get Athan's face plastered all over a Target, etc. You're barking up the wrong tree. The people here cannot move the needle for you.

Your product is advertising, and you need to sell it
 





short ornery norwegian

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Not quite NIL - but a bill being proposed in the California State Legislature would provide revenue-sharing for D1 athletes.

from Athletic Business.com:

As the NIL era continues to make certain college athletes quite wealthy, a California lawmaker introduced a bill Thursday that would require schools that play major college sports to pay some athletes as much as an additional $25,000 annually.

The College Athlete Protection Act would also cover the cost of six-year guaranteed athletic scholarships and post-college medical expenses.

Assembly Bill 252 — introduced by Holden, a Democrat whose district includes Pasadena — calls for Division I schools in California to share 50 percent of revenue with athletes who are considered to be undervalued because the amount of their athletic scholarships doesn’t match their market value. That would be mostly, but not exclusively, aimed at athletes competing in revenue-generating sports such as football and basketball.

According to the AP, money paid toward scholarships would be included in the 50 percent that goes toward the players. The rest would go into a fund that would pay out yearly. Individual payments would be determined based on what schools bring in and could not exceed $25,000 per year for any one athlete.

Any excess revenue from the athletes’ share would go into a degree completion fund that athletes would be eligible to draw from after they have graduated within six years.
 

Bob_Loblaw

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Not quite NIL - but a bill being proposed in the California State Legislature would provide revenue-sharing for D1 athletes.

from Athletic Business.com:

As the NIL era continues to make certain college athletes quite wealthy, a California lawmaker introduced a bill Thursday that would require schools that play major college sports to pay some athletes as much as an additional $25,000 annually.

The College Athlete Protection Act would also cover the cost of six-year guaranteed athletic scholarships and post-college medical expenses.

Assembly Bill 252 — introduced by Holden, a Democrat whose district includes Pasadena — calls for Division I schools in California to share 50 percent of revenue with athletes who are considered to be undervalued because the amount of their athletic scholarships doesn’t match their market value. That would be mostly, but not exclusively, aimed at athletes competing in revenue-generating sports such as football and basketball.

According to the AP, money paid toward scholarships would be included in the 50 percent that goes toward the players. The rest would go into a fund that would pay out yearly. Individual payments would be determined based on what schools bring in and could not exceed $25,000 per year for any one athlete.

Any excess revenue from the athletes’ share would go into a degree completion fund that athletes would be eligible to draw from after they have graduated within six years.
This will end up more corrupt than the Gator Collective.

Tax payer dollars paying student athletes? Yikes.
 



A_Slab_of_Bacon

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Not quite NIL - but a bill being proposed in the California State Legislature would provide revenue-sharing for D1 athletes.

from Athletic Business.com:

As the NIL era continues to make certain college athletes quite wealthy, a California lawmaker introduced a bill Thursday that would require schools that play major college sports to pay some athletes as much as an additional $25,000 annually.

The College Athlete Protection Act would also cover the cost of six-year guaranteed athletic scholarships and post-college medical expenses.

Assembly Bill 252 — introduced by Holden, a Democrat whose district includes Pasadena — calls for Division I schools in California to share 50 percent of revenue with athletes who are considered to be undervalued because the amount of their athletic scholarships doesn’t match their market value. That would be mostly, but not exclusively, aimed at athletes competing in revenue-generating sports such as football and basketball.

According to the AP, money paid toward scholarships would be included in the 50 percent that goes toward the players. The rest would go into a fund that would pay out yearly. Individual payments would be determined based on what schools bring in and could not exceed $25,000 per year for any one athlete.

Any excess revenue from the athletes’ share would go into a degree completion fund that athletes would be eligible to draw from after they have graduated within six years.


WTF would be the point of paying NON revenue sports?

If you're getting a full scholarship in a non revenue sport you're doing really well ....

That sounds like a recipie for cutting sports.
 

Word

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WTF would be the point of paying NON revenue sports?

If you're getting a full scholarship in a non revenue sport you're doing really well ....

That sounds like a recipie for cutting sports.
In the "careful what you wish for" category.

There's plenty of money in college sports. They can set some aside for health care.
 

Some guy

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Not quite NIL - but a bill being proposed in the California State Legislature would provide revenue-sharing for D1 athletes.

from Athletic Business.com:

As the NIL era continues to make certain college athletes quite wealthy, a California lawmaker introduced a bill Thursday that would require schools that play major college sports to pay some athletes as much as an additional $25,000 annually.

The College Athlete Protection Act would also cover the cost of six-year guaranteed athletic scholarships and post-college medical expenses.

Assembly Bill 252 — introduced by Holden, a Democrat whose district includes Pasadena — calls for Division I schools in California to share 50 percent of revenue with athletes who are considered to be undervalued because the amount of their athletic scholarships doesn’t match their market value. That would be mostly, but not exclusively, aimed at athletes competing in revenue-generating sports such as football and basketball.

According to the AP, money paid toward scholarships would be included in the 50 percent that goes toward the players. The rest would go into a fund that would pay out yearly. Individual payments would be determined based on what schools bring in and could not exceed $25,000 per year for any one athlete.

Any excess revenue from the athletes’ share would go into a degree completion fund that athletes would be eligible to draw from after they have graduated within six years.
Super interesting.
This is California banking on the ncaa moving either by choice or by case law.

It would be fun to watch. What if the ncaa isn’t moved and thus all California athletes can’t participate in the NCAA anymore.
 




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