Longtime Oklahoma Sooners football assistant Cale Gundy resigns after reading aloud 'shameful' word off player's iPad

WriterGoph

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That’s just making excuses for someone to be able to use a hateful word and perpetuates hatred and division. People need to be better than that.

White America called black people the N-word for multiple centuries (to go along with many other despicable cultural "traditions") and unfortunately the word is still used far too regularly in the South. So now you think we (white people) are in a position to tell them what they can and cannot say to each other? Get serious.
 

Flash30

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I’m a minority and another analogy to this cancel culture buffoonery is Mrs Butterworth’s, Aunt Jemima, or Uncle Bens Rice. I think of food, syrup is yummy and pancakes are great. If we are going to be sensitive over everything I would want to add Granny Smith apples because it’s derogatory toward geriatrics.
 

CentralGopher

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White America called black people the N-word for multiple centuries (to go along with many other despicable cultural "traditions") and unfortunately the word is still used far too regularly in the South. So now you think we (white people) are in a position to tell them what they can and cannot say to each other? Get serious.
You continue to make idiotic excuses for saying something everyone knows is disrespectful. People that do that are part of what is wrong with society.
 

fair

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Every time a non-sports topic comes up on this board, it’s incredible to see how out of touch some posters are. Still using the word “negro” regularly? Really?? At that point, you’re being intentionally ignorant using a word with a negative connotation.

In a vacuum, I wouldn’t say what Gundy did was fireable. He likely wasn’t being hateful with the word. However, if he just picked up an iPad and read the word multiple times without thought, it’s a pretty good sign that the word is a normal part of his vocabulary. Even if it’s not used hatefully, it’s ignorant on his part to not immediately recognize that it’s wrong. The vast majority of people would stop in their tracks if they were reading something aloud and came across the word.

To all of you complaining that the black community can use the word and you can’t: the word was used hatefully against them in the most racist times of our history. I think they have the right to take ownership of the word for themselves.

Genuinely curious for all of you up in arms: how does black people using the word amongst themselves affect your life? I have yet to see a valid reason in this thread or anywhere else.
 

Word

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I’m a minority and another analogy to this cancel culture buffoonery is Mrs Butterworth’s, Aunt Jemima, or Uncle Bens Rice. I think of food, syrup is yummy and pancakes are great. If we are going to be sensitive over everything I would want to add Granny Smith apples because it’s derogatory toward geriatrics.
I don't think anyone is equating Mrs Butterworth with the N word.
 


Gophers_4life

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White America called black people the N-word for multiple centuries (to go along with many other despicable cultural "traditions") and unfortunately the word is still used far too regularly in the South. So now you think we (white people) are in a position to tell them what they can and cannot say to each other? Get serious.
Also, like it or not, there is a clear difference when a black person uses a word ending in "ga" and when a non-black person uses a word ending in "ger".

My only comment on this terrible discussion, that belongs in OTB politics board.
 



GophersInIowa

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I’m a minority and another analogy to this cancel culture buffoonery is Mrs Butterworth’s, Aunt Jemima, or Uncle Bens Rice. I think of food, syrup is yummy and pancakes are great. If we are going to be sensitive over everything I would want to add Granny Smith apples because it’s derogatory toward geriatrics.
Does changing those names affect your ability to enjoy those products? Like were people buying them simply because they like the name?

I've used the new Pearl Mining Company (Aunt Jemima) syrup and it tastes just as good as it did before.
 



fair

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I’m a minority and another analogy to this cancel culture buffoonery is Mrs Butterworth’s, Aunt Jemima, or Uncle Bens Rice. I think of food, syrup is yummy and pancakes are great. If we are going to be sensitive over everything I would want to add Granny Smith apples because it’s derogatory toward geriatrics.
People love to use cancel culture as some sort of boogeyman. Changing the name of a product because of changing societal standards is not cancel culture. Same goes for changing a team name (Redskins, Indians). It’s okay to look at a name, say “maybe this doesn’t fly anymore”, and adjust accordingly. You said it yourself: you like the food. How does them changing names hurt you?
 

CentralGopher

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Every time a non-sports topic comes up on this board, it’s incredible to see how out of touch some posters are. Still using the word “negro” regularly? Really?? At that point, you’re being intentionally ignorant using a word with a negative connotation.

In a vacuum, I wouldn’t say what Gundy did was fireable. He likely wasn’t being hateful with the word. However, if he just picked up an iPad and read the word multiple times without thought, it’s a pretty good sign that the word is a normal part of his vocabulary. Even if it’s not used hatefully, it’s ignorant on his part to not immediately recognize that it’s wrong. The vast majority of people would stop in their tracks if they were reading something aloud and came across the word.

To all of you complaining that the black community can use the word and you can’t: the word was used hatefully against them in the most racist times of our history. I think they have the right to take ownership of the word for themselves.

Genuinely curious for all of you up in arms: how does black people using the word amongst themselves affect your life? I have yet to see a valid reason in this thread or anywhere else.
I’m part Irish. What does that give me an excuse to say or do? Such idiotic reasoning for something known to be racist and divisive.
 

Nax5

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Does it really matter? No. Negro is Spanish for Black. It accurately describes skin color. Your nitpick is irrelevant.
I'll disagree that it's a nitpick. I think you'll find using either term will get you in trouble in most social settings. Just wondering what your justification was for it.
 




Gophers1992

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People love to use cancel culture as some sort of boogeyman. Changing the name of a product because of changing societal standards is not cancel culture. Same goes for changing a team name (Redskins, Indians). It’s okay to look at a name, say “maybe this doesn’t fly anymore”, and adjust accordingly. You said it yourself: you like the food. How does them changing names hurt you?
"Cancel culture" = I don't want consequences for my actions.
 


Gophers1992

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You’re unaware of history? It’s pretty we’ll know how the Irish were treated.
You in the 21st century are not facing obstacles from being Irish. Black people using the n-word should not bother you. The fact that it does is alarming.
 

Donovan

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GophersInIowa

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You in the 21st century are not facing obstacles from being Irish. Black people using the n-word should not bother you. The fact that it does is alarming.
I personally cringe when I hear it no matter who it is. It's a word that comes from hate, I would just prefer to not hear it. Or my kids. At the same time if black people want to use it, then that's up to them.
 

fair

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I’m part Irish. What does that give me an excuse to say or do? Such idiotic reasoning for something known to be racist and divisive.
This is such hilarious whataboutism. I’m sorry there isn’t an equivalent word for Irish people to use for themselves.

You’re right, the word is rooted in racism. But if you genuinely believe that black people using the word amongst themselves is racist, then I don’t know what to tell you. Again, you have yet to answer how it actually affects you. All I’m gathering so far is that you feel left out that someone else is allowed to do something that you aren’t.

GophersInIowa’s comment is perfectly reasonable. You might not like to hear the word, but at the end of the day, it’s not up to you to decide.
 

Flash30

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People love to use cancel culture as some sort of boogeyman. Changing the name of a product because of changing societal standards is not cancel culture. Same goes for changing a team name (Redskins, Indians). It’s okay to look at a name, say “maybe this doesn’t fly anymore”, and adjust accordingly. You said it yourself: you like the food. How does them changing names hurt you?
It’s silly to change it in the first place because I don’t get bent over the original name 😂.
 


CentralGopher

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This is such hilarious whataboutism. I’m sorry there isn’t an equivalent word for Irish people to use for themselves.

You’re right, the word is rooted in racism. But if you genuinely believe that black people using the word amongst themselves is racist, then I don’t know what to tell you. Again, you have yet to answer how it actually affects you. All I’m gathering so far is that you feel left out that someone else is allowed to do something that you aren’t.

GophersInIowa’s comment is perfectly reasonable. You might not like to hear the word, but at the end of the day, it’s not up to you to decide.
Me and the rest of the potato eaters genuinely feel bad for people like you that think it’s acceptable for anyone to use such a racist and disrespectful word like that no matter the case.
 

MennoSota

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In the UK and Australia, they use the C-word freely and in many different ways. In the US, it's considered one of the more vile words by a majority of people. Say a guy from the UK worked for an international company and was in the US on business travel. He is out with female co-workers for drinks and calls someone a "c---" in a joking manner. Regardless of his intention, the guy is out of line for not understanding how that will be received by another culture (which is not his own). It's highly likely said guy would be either terminated or heavily disciplined by his company.

Adults have to be able to read the room and understand what lines are not to be crossed - regardless of intent. I feel like this is something I learned when I was a teenager. It's really not a hard concept for a 50-year-old man to grasp.
So...no one in that culture should use it...correct?
 

MennoSota

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I'll disagree that it's a nitpick. I think you'll find using either term will get you in trouble in most social settings. Just wondering what your justification was for it.
Indeed, cancel culture will find any word offensive.
I like Smokey Robinson's poem, "Being Black in America." It says it all.
 


Nax5

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Indeed, cancel culture will find any word offensive.
I like Smokey Robinson's poem, "Being Black in America." It says it all.
But both of those terms have been out of favor for like 70 years...That would pre-date cancel culture.
 

highwayman

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The post from MennoSota specifically mentioned the double standard in using the word. I was not addressing what Gundy did, but rather explaining that there is a difference when it comes to use of the word.
My point exactly and I was agreeing with you. Quoting someone else is not “using” a word. It’s a quote. We live in a world of childish narcissists who are just as racist as the people they call out.
 

Replacement Gopher

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I personally cringe when I hear it no matter who it is. It's a word that comes from hate, I would just prefer to not hear it. Or my kids. At the same time if black people want to use it, then that's up to them.
Every time a non-sports topic comes up on this board, it’s incredible to see how out of touch some posters are. Still using the word “negro” regularly? Really?? At that point, you’re being intentionally ignorant using a word with a negative connotation.

In a vacuum, I wouldn’t say what Gundy did was fireable. He likely wasn’t being hateful with the word. However, if he just picked up an iPad and read the word multiple times without thought, it’s a pretty good sign that the word is a normal part of his vocabulary. Even if it’s not used hatefully, it’s ignorant on his part to not immediately recognize that it’s wrong. The vast majority of people would stop in their tracks if they were reading something aloud and came across the word.

To all of you complaining that the black community can use the word and you can’t: the word was used hatefully against them in the most racist times of our history. I think they have the right to take ownership of the word for themselves.

Genuinely curious for all of you up in arms: how does black people using the word amongst themselves affect your life? I have yet to see a valid reason in this thread or anywhere else.
As I mentioned I worked in a setting where the vast majority of our staff and patients were African American/Black. I was shocked at how often I heard that word being used. I can say many of our African American patients and staff did not like hearing that word either, regardless of what letter was at the end, and it put everyone in a weird spot when someone would use the word - what do you when someone tells a funny story, uses that word, some in the room don’t appreciate the word, yourself included, and those that laugh are seen as tacitly approving of the word and its use.

HR recommended I not reference use of any specific words in our policy, so that left me saying, “please don’t use that word” whenever I heard it until it got stamped out of our culture and we had a standard response when we heard its use. Whenever I got pushback, I just had to say, “it puts me in a really weird spot, so I would appreciate your help here”. (Frankly it put a lot of people in a weird spot, but I wasn’t going to put that on others).

Until it got removed from our culture I would have had a hard time firing anybody who said that word in certain context given its prevalence in the culture at the time.

Bringing it up to a higher level, I wish it was removed from our culture. Unfortunately my kids hear the word when they listen to their music and on social media. I’ve told my children, be careful about what you say - if you say or read the lyrics to some of the songs you listen to, your life could be seriously impacted regardless of your intent. So when you see Snoop at Super Bowl halftime, or in commercials, movies, etc. you best never say his lyrics word for word. Fair? No, but what in life is?
 


WriterGoph

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Wayment. Whether someone’s opinion matters is a function of where they live?

That's all it is...an opinion. But someone from a different country isn't going to go and tell a bunch of Brits/Aussies what words they can or cannot say because he finds it offensive in America.

It's not a hard concept.

White America used a nasty word towards black Americans for hundreds and hundreds of years. Some of those same black people eventually decided to turn that word around and use it within their own culture without the negative connotation. Now those same white folks are deciding it's too offensive for their ears and they want to call the shots on what black people can say?

GTFO.
 




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