Coach P says Minnesota hasn’t had the resources to pursue players who are seeking $20,000, $40,000 or $75,000 NIL deals

BleedGopher

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Per Shooter:

— New Gophers women’s basketball coach Dawn Plitzuweit, speaking at a Dunkers club gathering the other day, said Minnesota hasn’t had the resources to pursue players who are seeking $20,000, $40,000 or $75,000 in name, image and likeness (NIL) deals.


Go Gophers!!
 

The fake values being assigned to NIL not remotely related to true value of the name, image and likeness is just pay to play. Going to be an era of bought teams if it isn't pretty much there already.

The money the gals like Bueckers and Clark are making is pretty legit, they actually have the following and the name and their deals are with real companies, not newly formed NIL coops created for the sole purpose of paying players to come to their school.
 

Per Shooter:

— New Gophers women’s basketball coach Dawn Plitzuweit, speaking at a Dunkers club gathering the other day, said Minnesota hasn’t had the resources to pursue players who are seeking $20,000, $40,000 or $75,000 in name, image and likeness (NIL) deals.


Go Gophers!!
In 2023 $20,000, $40,000 is not very much money on the internet.
So, I'm totally surprised with the huge number of attorneys, the fact players can have agents that it isn't readily available...
I'm shocked somebody has not hooked up with Braun and she isn't making well over $100,000.

Then the trickle down effect. I think the girls that can play should find it pretty easy to get paid.
So, if Braun doesn't have deals she'll get them.
Then, if her teammates distinguish themselves, they'll get paid.

The idea the whole team is going to get paid is more the coop plan.
AND, paying recruits is supposed to be illegal. Like I say, I think you need to find a way to pay the players who perform once they are here. Otherwise, they have the portal.
 
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It’s even harder to compete when you have teams like Texas Tech and South Carolina guaranteed every player to receive at least $25,000 in NIL, as a base, plus whatever they earn individually.
 

as a general rule of thumb, I would think that most women's players are going to receive lower amounts of NIL compared to the men.

Obviously, the big stars like Bueckers and Clark are a different story.

bottom line, the women's game needs to cultivate supporters and boosters who are willing to support gender-specific NIL collectives - or make individual deals with players.
 


It’s even harder to compete when you have teams like Texas Tech and South Carolina guaranteed every player to receive at least $25,000 in NIL, as a base, plus whatever they earn individually.
Yes, in basketball, I'm not sure why that's not already done. In women's basketball that's $150,000
to give each player on the team $10,000.
Dividend investing with some covered calls gets that done with somebody's million dollars on deposit or some very conservative similar plan. Or raise a $150,000 annually. Gotta be fairly simple.
Football, 110 guys on the roster...bigger problem. I think the problem is we (the school) are trying to do ALL sports versus somebody stepping up and just doing women's basketball or just volleyball or just men's basketball. Start somewhere. Get the other programs jealous enough to take some action.
 

as a general rule of thumb, I would think that most women's players are going to receive lower amounts of NIL compared to the men.

Obviously, the big stars like Bueckers and Clark are a different story.

bottom line, the women's game needs to cultivate supporters and boosters who are willing to support gender-specific NIL collectives - or make individual deals with players.
I think there are enough businesses run by women to say BS. Or, businesses who do not want to offend women. I kinda think the opposite...I think raising the money would be easier. "It's our time", we're comin'", "look out here we go", suffered long enough", "don't want your help, we'll do it ourselves.". "We belong front and center." "We deserve this." ETC All those types of convictions, motivations and more inspiring women to take charge, get it done.
 

We don't have S for NIL money for football and or Mens basketball program reaks. Not a shock Women's program doesn't have great donors beyond what already exist. We do not have big collectives or extremely wealthy donors.
 

We don't have S for NIL money for football and or Mens basketball program reaks. Not a shock Women's program doesn't have great donors beyond what already exist. We do not have big collectives or extremely wealthy donors.
Men's basketball to me is the surprise...it is 13 players...not 85 or 110. We have the Dunkers for men's basketball. There is a collection of guys very much interested in the success of Gopher men's basketball. Together they certainly comprise a group beyond extremely wealthy.

What evidently is lacking is a leader with a plan they can all get behind. Then somebody to take action and get it done. I'm shocked this is not in place for men's basketball. Only thing that makes any sense is a boycott until they get a coach they can invest in.

I could see women's happening before the men.
 



Naively asking who are possible NIL donors? Who makes it happen?
 

Naively asking who are possible NIL donors? Who makes it happen?
In addition to the list below Clark has a Nike deal. McDonalds, Sparkling Ice, JanSport, and H&R Block. I'm sure there is more. So, star players individually get national brands.

Teams are more likely to get money from an individual donor with money or ties to the school.
Teams get money from coops where they pool the money together and attract a bunch of donors typically contributing smaller amounts individually and volume adds up. Fans or small businesses like Baldy's.



Individually, star players like Clark have deals like this:
Screenshot 2023-08-08 at 1.35.31 AM.png
 
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NIL insta followers during NCAA Tourney
When Clark already had many of her agreements in place, she "only" had 230k instagram followers. Only after the tourney did her following blow up to the 735,000 followers she has now.
https://www.instagram.com/caitlinclark22/reels/


Only four guys had 16,000 or more followers on instagram in the Final Four. This leads to my thought that women can and will make more NIL money individually. 16 players in the women's NCAA Final Four had 16,000 or more followers.

With USA basketball, Braun is now up to 23,000 instagram followers.
Screenshot 2023-08-08 at 2.30.21 AM.png
So, I think Braun can land NIL deals. https://www.instagram.com/mara_braun/
Probably be helpful if the USA wins in September and she posts more often.
 
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Thanks for the info. So the players attract NIL offers. Some schools get money from donors who give to the entire team right? It just seems like some business(es) would be interested in giving NIL money to the U of M. But it means good players. Catch 22 sort of situation favoring schools who get great players with great coaches. And I do think Coach P will do well with this team. Need NIL money to keep top players instate.
 

Thanks for the info. So the players attract NIL offers. Some schools get money from donors who give to the entire team right? It just seems like some business(es) would be interested in giving NIL money to the U of M. But it means good players. Catch 22 sort of situation favoring schools who get great players with great coaches. And I do think Coach P will do well with this team. Need NIL money to keep top players instate.
Yes, players have the opportunity to have agents and broker their own deals. Having a large social media following to communicate with their fans is appealing to some companies.

Entire teams rely on a collective group to assemble money in trade for minimal public exposure
with charities or personal appearances etc. The easiest way for the entire team getting equal pay is a large benevolent donor.

Where we are especially behind is the ability to offer anything significant to all players on the smaller roster teams like basketball, volleyball.
And we evidently don't have a mentor helping individual players to facilitate their own deals.
 

Yes, players have the opportunity to have agents and broker their own deals. Having a large social media following to communicate with their fans is appealing to some companies.

Entire teams rely on a collective group to assemble money in trade for minimal public exposure
with charities or personal appearances etc. The easiest way for the entire team getting equal pay is a large benevolent donor.

Where we are especially behind is the ability to offer anything significant to all players on the smaller roster teams like basketball, volleyball.
And we evidently don't have a mentor helping individual players to facilitate their own deals.
Naively asking again if Coyle has responsibility in this arena?
 

Naively asking again if Coyle has responsibility in this arena?
That's a very difficult question to answer. One, I don't know all the rules of what he can and can't do to raise money for this purpose. We know part of his job is to fund raise for facilities, scholarships and the like. We know he has not amazed anyone by diminishing the debt through fundraising of the Athletes Village.
It is his athletic department. He is responsible. They have a huge number of people working in the athletic department. We do have someone Coyle hired to accomplish NIL fundraising. I believe we have a department or division this person leads that is working on this...so yes, I'd say overall Coyle has responsibility.
I think some individual needs to just do it for themselves. I looked for the stories but couldn't find them about family members of athletes at other schools who made calls and pursued deals for their son or daughter. (I read them somewhere) They were successful.
 

Many players that are stars in their league / area, but maybe not nationally, get small NIL deals. Sometimes these deals involve cash payments, other times they involve merchandise. When my daughter was at South Dakota, NIL was in play for her final year. She and a few of her fellow USD athletes had merchandise agreements with a few companies. While she didn’t get money, she did get a lot of really cute clothes, sports drinks, and a few other things. She had to feature the products in her Instagram feed. I think this sort of thing happens a lot across the country. In addition, many players are now running camps for younger kids, during their two free weeks they have in the end of July or beginning of August. They are now able to monetize their name in their home towns, which is good for encouraging young fans, and good community relations.
 
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