Boom! Miami Player Wong will enter transfer portal if NIL isn’t increased!

GopherBlood666

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Kansas is embracing the spirit of NIL with their Barnstorming tour. College players should be able to travel around to get paid for appearances, signing autographs, etc... Or the scenarios like when a kid is trying to start a t-shirt business while being an athlete that has been shut down in the past. It's getting pretty dicey when it goes beyond that.
 

bga1

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Why are they supposed to be unpaid amateurs?
They already were paid. The idea was that the college would take a chance and offer you 4 years of education and you would agree to that bargain and develop over 4 years. The benefit for the player is obvious- gain maturity, a college education, a chance in a lifetime opportunity to play before crowds and win games for the university you chose. This idea that money is everything in our choices is a really really bad one. I personally think that a kid going through 4 years of having to develop and stick with something is likely better statistically for the kids than making $100k a year at age 19 for being able to run and jump with no long term commitment to team or university.

Considering that 60- 80% of adult pro athletes end up BROKE a couple of years after they retire tells me that the straight emphasis on getting paid during college might not be so great. Maturity, character and commitment > cash IMO.

Look, for the kids that want the cash and not the education, they should be free to go pro to the NBA G League, Europe or where ever. College was supposed to be amateur sports.

Here is a point of reference to my above guess:
Statistics suggest that up to 78% of NFL players go bankrupt or fall into severe financial stress within just two years of retirement. For basketball players, the figures are only slightly better at 60% of financial ruin within five years of retirement.

A lot of money comes to draftees as a lump sum signing bonus, essentially front-loading their careers while they're still getting their toes wet in the world. As a direct consequence, many of them fall into a lavish lifestyle characterized by million-dollar cars, mansions, extravagant parties and more.
By the third or fourth year of their careers, players are already straining to live up to their former lavish lifestyle without their bonuses. This unsustainability spirals over time and creates a financial burden, even before players approach retirement.

 
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Gophers1992

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They already were paid. The idea was that the college would take a chance and offer you 4 years of education and you would agree to that bargain and develop over 4 years. The benefit for the player is obvious- gain maturity, a college education, a chance in a lifetime opportunity to play before crowds and win games for the university you chose. This idea that money is everything in our choices is a really really bad one. I personally think that a kid going through 4 years of having to develop and stick with something is likely better statistically for the kids than making $100k a year at age 19 for being able to run and jump with no long term commitment to team or university.

Considering that 80% of adult pro athletes end up BROKE a couple of years after they retire tells me that the straight emphasis on getting paid during college might not be so great. Maturity, character and commitment > cash IMO.

Look, for the kids that want the cash and not the education, they should be free to go pro to the NBA G League, Europe or where ever. College was supposed to be amateur sports.
I don't necessarily disagree with the bolded, but the problem is taking away someone's right to earn whatever cash they are worth. That's the sticking point. Like it or not, kids should have this option.
 


bga1

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I don't necessarily disagree with the bolded, but the problem is taking away someone's right to earn whatever cash they are worth. That's the sticking point. Like it or not, kids should have this option.
In college you are....well were.... a volunteer and you sign off on what you get for being that volunteer and what your responsibilities are.

Now that they have opened the door on this- there probably is no way to limit it. You either can or you can't. Now you can. No one was preventing them from going elsewhere before to make money. Getting free college to play basketball isn't exactly North Korea.
 

short ornery norwegian

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the real irony of this:

the seeds of NIL were planted because schools did not want to make direct payments to athletes.

If D1 had agreed on some type of direct stipend system for scholarship athletes, (money in excess of regular scholarship benefits), then the current situation might never have happened.

But, schools did not want to "pay" athletes. While the athletes saw schools making big money off of their efforts. So, because the schools did not want to cut in the athletes on the big-money TV pie, they paved the way for their current predicament.

and of course, the original idea behind NIL was much simpler: allow Joe Stud to sell his own T-shirts and posters, or do a TV commercial for Crazy Eddie's Discount Stereos. then the vultures descended and the current mess ensued.

The only way out is National NIL Legislation adopted by Congress. State-by-state laws won't work, and the NCAA is toothless.

BTW - the earlier Supreme Court decision dealt with "education-related benefits" only. It did not address any type of compensation for athletic services. So a national NIL bill passed by Congress would have to be able to withstand any court challenges. Go back and read Kavanaugh's opinion on the earlier case. He ripped the NCAA a new bung-hole. (and he likes beer.....)
 

ecoperson

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Why are they supposed to be unpaid amateurs?
Because universities are supposed to be about an education and sports are supposed to be a way for those students to participate in extracurricular activities. The sports business as we know it today has absolutely no place mixed up with educational institutions.

Why are athletes that care only about honing their games being forced to waste their time pretending to be students? Let the pro leagues offer some developmental league and those players who don't value the education can focus on their trade.
 




Dakota2

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Still haven't heard any argument against NIL freedom besides "it's not fair" and "I'm jealous"
The only argument is that college athletics is amateur, not professional.

No athlete is denied the opportunity to work and be compensated as a professional on a pro team. The NBA is the only entity that constrains free trade by requiring one year of college first. If we are seriously concerned with the athletes they should be free to go pro at any age, even while still in high school.

None of that has anything to do with amateur sports.
 

Gophers1992

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The only argument is that college athletics is amateur, not professional.

No athlete is denied the opportunity to work and be compensated as a professional on a pro team. The NBA is the only entity that constrains free trade by requiring one year of college first. If we are seriously concerned with the athletes they should be free to go pro at any age, even while still in high school.

None of that has anything to do with amateur sports.
NFL is even more restrictive.
 

ecoperson

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and of course, the original idea behind NIL was much simpler: allow Joe Stud to sell his own T-shirts and posters, or do a TV commercial for Crazy Eddie's Discount Stereos. then the vultures descended and the current mess ensued.

The only way out is National NIL Legislation adopted by Congress. State-by-state laws won't work, and the NCAA is toothless.
I offered a similar assessment about a week ago. The wild west won't last long as it will cause the whole enchilada to collapse.
  • The NCAA doesn't want to lose the cash cow that is March Madness and CFP.
  • The pro leagues don't want to foot the expense for developing football and basketball players.
  • The universities don't want to lose the publicity and alumni connections driven by big time sports.
 

Dakota2

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100%

As it stands right now the sit rule is the only option. If they want to move around to make more- then go to the G League or overseas, don't use what was formerly our higher education system to hawk your wares every year to the highest bidder. There has to be a balance between rights and responsibilities and at the moment, it's all rights.
There is another legal issue that will arise. How can public universities justify providing public facilities -- arenas, training and practice areas, expensive travel, hotels, meals, uniforms -- to professional athletes?

That question will soon be asked and must be answered.
 



Gophers_4life

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Ok but how are players going to agree to any sort of deal that limits their ability to profit off of their name image and likeness? The NFL doesn't cap how much Aaron Rodgers gets paid to do state farm commercials.
They don't need to because that is a supplement to his primary income from the Packers.

College NIL is the primary income. Completely different.


Now to your point of why would players agree to do that, this is a fair and difficult point to overcome.

Probably they wouldn't.

The only way I can think of is if they are allowed to be given actual primary income by the schools, which then makes NIL supplementary again like in the pro's.
 

ecoperson

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The only argument is that college athletics is amateur, not professional.

No athlete is denied the opportunity to work and be compensated as a professional on a pro team. The NBA is the only entity that constrains free trade by requiring one year of college first. If we are seriously concerned with the athletes they should be free to go pro at any age, even while still in high school.

None of that has anything to do with amateur sports.
Thanks for bringing up the NBA requirement for one year of college. That rule is simply ludicrous on so many counts. I am surprised that this hasn't been challenged in court. If I am a high school student and can play in the league, I should be able to do so as long as I meet my state's requirements for attending school.
 

Gophers1992

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They don't need to because that is a supplement to his primary income from the Packers.

College NIL is the primary income. Completely different.


Now to your point of why would players agree to do that, this is a fair and difficult point to overcome.

Probably they wouldn't.

The only way I can think of is if they are allowed to be given actual primary income by the schools, which then makes NIL supplementary again like in the pro's.
Primary/secondary/tertiary is really irrelevant here. And even if schools do end up paying kids, it wouldn't exceed what some of these top NIL deals are, making those still the "primary" income, to use your words.
 

Gophers_4life

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Thanks for bringing up the NBA requirement for one year of college. That rule is simply ludicrous on so many counts. I am surprised that this hasn't been challenged in court. If I am a high school student and can play in the league, I should be able to do so as long as I meet my state's requirements for attending school.
I think the NBA just says you have to be 19? I don't know necessarily that you had to have gone to college for a year.

Why is it illegal for a business to require an age limit?
 

ecoperson

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There is another legal issue that will arise. How can public universities justify providing public facilities -- arenas, training and practice areas, expensive travel, hotels, meals, uniforms -- to professional athletes?

That question will soon be asked and must be answered.
Well said... universities, or truly the athletic departments of universities, spend a fortune on these costs. The NIL as currently structured makes these investments extremely risky if some capricious and unscrupulous outside actor can suddenly poach a student athlete.
 

bga1

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There is another legal issue that will arise. How can public universities justify providing public facilities -- arenas, training and practice areas, expensive travel, hotels, meals, uniforms -- to professional athletes?

That question will soon be asked and must be answered.
As much as I agree with you philosophically, I think that is easily refuted. The University professors can write books, make speeches or whatever, capitalizing on their job at the U. They use the facilities. An artist in art classes could go sell their art, etc. I think legally it can be done. Everything about it is ruinous though.
 

Gophers_4life

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Primary/secondary/tertiary is really irrelevant here. And even if schools do end up paying kids, it wouldn't exceed what some of these top NIL deals are, making those still the "primary" income, to use your words.
Maybe. We don't know though.

If what we have now is so obvious ... then why aren't billionaires giving NFL players so much money in NIL deals that it overtakes what they make in league salary?

Why not set it up so that everyone on the team makes the league minimum, and then let NIL deals make up the rest of it in an unlimited/unregulated manner?


Why is there such a difference, here?
 

ecoperson

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I think the NBA just says you have to be 19? I don't know necessarily that you had to have gone to college for a year.

Why is it illegal for a business to require an age limit?
If tied to age, then that is my bad. Why can't a student athlete jump immediately to the NBA on their 19th birthday? I know... I know... draft rules... blah, blah, blah. It seems like this should follow the NHL model where teams can pick up college students mid year whether they hold their rights or as a 'free agent.'
 

stocker08

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I mean they had a whole Supreme Court case over this didn't they? And they ruled that the NCAA was acting illegally in prohibiting players' ability to earn money.

Yes. But that ruling was in relation to athletes being barred from ANY outside compensation. I think the Supreme Court ruling on a ceiling for athletes would potentially have a different ruling.
 

Gophers1992

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Yes. But that ruling was in relation to athletes being barred from ANY outside compensation. I think the Supreme Court ruling on a ceiling for athletes would potentially have a different ruling.
I'll fully admit that I do not have the legal knowledge to speak confidently on this, but how can they justifiably pass a law that says "college athletes can't be paid more than $100K", or whatever figure they choose. Doesn't make sense to me, but again I am open to being proven wrong.
 


Dakota2

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I think the NBA just says you have to be 19? I don't know necessarily that you had to have gone to college for a year.

Why is it illegal for a business to require an age limit?
Restraint of trade.
 

Dakota2

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Well said... universities, or truly the athletic departments of universities, spend a fortune on these costs. The NIL as currently structured makes these investments extremely risky if some capricious and unscrupulous outside actor can suddenly poach a student athlete.
Not only risky but illegal. Only a matter of time before some public university will be sued on that point.
 

leib0039

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I think there are a ton of great points here. I think the answer to a lot of it is "well we are too far down the rabbit hole to change things now".

Look at the difference from Europe to USA. Luka Doncic wants to play pro at 14 he sure can, if Real Madrid want to spend $50m on a 12 yr old soccer player from Turkey they are allowed to do that. Where US pro sports are, they dont want to deal with kids, its hard enough for them to scout 18 yr olds and get burned drafting a kid at 19 who is a flop that you paid $20m to, imagine doing that for an eighth grader. They also don't have a salary cap, you want to pay a guy $100m a year, thats up to you. The Euro model of pro sports is why eventually I don't think the $$ difference on a college team will mean as much. It is so new now everyone thinks they deserve the most $$, over time that model will play out and kids will find out, hey the top players are getting X, middle players Y, bottom players Z and everyone will kind of slot in, at least i think ha.
 

Dakota2

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As much as I agree with you philosophically, I think that is easily refuted. The University professors can write books, make speeches or whatever, capitalizing on their job at the U. They use the facilities. An artist in art classes could go sell their art, etc. I think legally it can be done. Everything about it is ruinous though.
See your point but don't think the correlation is that strong. Art students can sell their work. Students can also play minor league basketball and be paid. But the art student is not on the university art team, traveling at university expense and being paid whether her art is good or not.

As for professors who don't teach but just take advantage of making outside personal income while drawing a salary, that is rotten too.
 

Ope3

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I think the NBA just says you have to be 19? I don't know necessarily that you had to have gone to college for a year.

Why is it illegal for a business to require an age limit?
The age limit is collectively bargained between the Owners and their Union.
 

leib0039

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Back to Wong, he is STAYING at Miami. He is keeping his same NIL deal but Ruiz/school said they would work on finding him others too. Sounds like neither has the cajones to pull the trigger. Ruiz found out he cant just say NOPE SORRY NO MORE and Wong found out he just cant say hes leaving give him more.
 




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