Boom! Miami Player Wong will enter transfer portal if NIL isn’t increased!


bga1

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Salary (NIL) cap would be the ideal situation.

Would also be great if only bona fide NIL deals were allowed. Something tangible (you know, with the player's NIL actually being used!) must be produced.
A cap would be good but now that the cat is out of the bag, they aren't amateurs anymore, who really has the legal right to do this? No one can tell an actor that they can't make a million dollars because they are still in high school. I think the line they had was pretty clear and legal- to play for a college you get your scholarship and room and board and perhaps a stipend. Now that that's been breached all bets are off. Maybe each player has to register his NIL deal with the NCAA but man, that would be quite a thing to monitor considering the number of players involved.
 
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Gophers_4life

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A cap would be good but now that the cat is out of the bag, they aren't amateurs anymore, who really has the legal right to do this? No one can tell and actor that they can't make a million dollars because they are still in high school. I think the line they had was pretty clear and legal- to play for a college you get your scholarship and room and board and perhaps a stipend. Now that that's been breached all bets are off. Maybe each player has to register his NIL deal with the NCAA but man, that would be quite a thing to monitor considering the number of players involved.
Well, the NCAA rulebook is quite thick. Do you think every school has NCAA agents inspecting them day and night looking for any kind of infraction?

I think, like in those cases, they (the NCAA) would investigate if something is reported. What else can you do, really in life?
 



Gophers1992

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Still haven't heard any argument against NIL freedom besides "it's not fair" and "I'm jealous"
 

leib0039

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A salary cap will never happen in college. I still think the way to curtail this is to say you are free to transfer wherever you would like, but everyone has to sit a year. That to me is the only mechanism the NCAA has to slow it down. Wong you want to leave for more NIL, that is your option, but you have to sit, would be interesting to see what those companies would do knowing that player isnt playing that whole year and could easily bolt to a pro league after that. Put some responsibility on the players, you want power fine, but with that comes stipulations.
 

Gophers_4life

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Still haven't heard any argument against NIL freedom besides "it's not fair" and "I'm jealous"
My argument is that when this big "restructure" comes, and at the top they basically form a new age CFA, that the players at those schools will form a union.

From there, they will be in the best position to negotiate compensation and if they (and the schools) are smart, they will copy the NFL model and work out a way to incorporate some sense of "fairness" between however many total teams are in this new league.
 

Gophers1992

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My argument is that when this big "restructure" comes, and at the top they basically form a new age CFA, that the players at those schools will form a union.

From there, they will be in the best position to negotiate compensation and if they (and the schools) are smart, they will copy the NFL model and work out a way to incorporate some sense of "fairness" between however many total teams are in this new league.
Ok but how are players going to agree to any sort of deal that limits their ability to profit off of their name image and likeness? The NFL doesn't cap how much Aaron Rodgers gets paid to do state farm commercials.
 



bga1

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A salary cap will never happen in college. I still think the way to curtail this is to say you are free to transfer wherever you would like, but everyone has to sit a year. That to me is the only mechanism the NCAA has to slow it down. Wong you want to leave for more NIL, that is your option, but you have to sit, would be interesting to see what those companies would do knowing that player isnt playing that whole year and could easily bolt to a pro league after that. Put some responsibility on the players, you want power fine, but with that comes stipulations.
100%

As it stands right now the sit rule is the only option. If they want to move around to make more- then go to the G League or overseas, don't use what was formerly our higher education system to hawk your wares every year to the highest bidder. There has to be a balance between rights and responsibilities and at the moment, it's all rights.
 

ecoperson

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Still haven't heard any argument against NIL freedom besides "it's not fair" and "I'm jealous"
My argument is that D-1 athletes are supposed to be unpaid amateurs. I would like to simply see a minor league structure including salaries in place for athletes who are currently only in college to improve their draft position. Lesser athletes who value the education can continue in the NCAA model of old.

These minor league athletes could take all of the endorsements they want in addition to their salary.

The NCAA won't agree as they would lose their cash cows but it would clean up the game and get us out of this facade of amateur players that we are seeing today. I would have argued for this minor league concept decades ago.

The NBA and NFL would never agree to it as the NCAA has always served to groom their future players. If the NCAA went the true amateur model, those leagues would now have to bear these costs.
 


Dakota2

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Ruiz is not smart. He is an egotistical fanatic that thinks he is helping "his" team by throwing his money around. He is destroying the team.

OK, so he pays these transfers top dollar to come join the team to make it better. He thinks by adding these players to the current roster that it will be even better and "worth the NIL costs" of these new players". But in doing so, he just pissed off the current players that then leave the team. So his dream team never materializes.

And the coach just stands there as this idiot meddles with the team.
Ruiz to his employee: "You are never to pass the ball to anyone other than another of my employees. Either shoot every time you touch it or get to another of my guys to shoot."

Wong: "Not a problem, boss."

Coach: "WTF? Hand me my blanket and bottle."

NCAA: "Lookin' good."
 



bga1

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At this point, the way I see it, this is going to be very damaging to college basketball from a fan perspective. I have always preferred college basketball because, despite the flaws and the cheaters, there was sense that there was some level of loyalty and lay it all on the line attitude for the college. If a guy was good enough he got a chance at making money in the NBA or Europe but in the meantime it was a privilege to play for a college team and get an education the would be helpful for the 98% who will be heading into the real world.

Now the whole thing is being bastardized into a semi pro league. If people have a choice between watching guys get paid, they are probably going to see the NBA if it's just two pro teams.
 

MNVCGUY

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At this point, the way I see it, this is going to be very damaging to college basketball from a fan perspective. I have always preferred college basketball because, despite the flaws and the cheaters, there was sense that there was some level of loyalty and lay it all on the line attitude for the college. If a guy was good enough he got a chance at making money in the NBA or Europe but in the meantime it was a privilege to play for a college team and get an education the would be helpful for the 98% who will be heading into the real world.

Now the whole thing is being bastardized into a semi pro league. If people have a choice between watching guys get paid, they are probably going to see the NBA if it's just two pro teams.
To your last part, I agree to a point however I don't think any of this will really change the game itself. To the extent I much prefer the way the college game is played to the way the pro game is played so while the NIL/Transfer....stuff will be annoying as a fan it still won't change the fact that the college game is more fun to watch than the pro game for many.
 

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My problem with NIL is not so much that the kids are getting paid but rather that what they are getting paid for, in my view, is not NIL. The reason they are getting such large deals is because of the history of the NCAA, not solely their NIL. If they went to the G League or any other league, how much would they be worth? My guess is a lot less.

My totally hypothetical example:
Player X goes to the Another League and makes $10,000.
Player X goes to College and makes $100,000.
The $90,000 premium would not be due to their own NIL.

If they are receiving more by going to college, then the premium they receive is not due to their own NIL, it's due to the NCAA's 100+ years of tradition. How can they still be amateurs when the bulk (theoretically) of the money is not due to their own NIL?
 

Gophers1992

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My argument is that D-1 athletes are supposed to be unpaid amateurs. I would like to simply see a minor league structure including salaries in place for athletes who are currently only in college to improve their draft position. Lesser athletes who value the education can continue in the NCAA model of old.

These minor league athletes could take all of the endorsements they want in addition to their salary.

The NCAA won't agree as they would lose their cash cows but it would clean up the game and get us out of this facade of amateur players that we are seeing today. I would have argued for this minor league concept decades ago.

The NBA and NFL would never agree to it as the NCAA has always served to groom their future players. If the NCAA went the true amateur model, those leagues would now have to bear these costs.
Based on what? The only thing that backs this idea up is outdated NCAA rules that were rightfully struck down by the courts.
 

MNVCGUY

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My problem with NIL is not so much that the kids are getting paid but rather that what they are getting paid for, in my view, is not NIL. The reason they are getting such large deals is because of the history of the NCAA, not solely their NIL. If they went to the G League or any other league, how much would they be worth? My guess is a lot less.

My totally hypothetical example:
Player X goes to the Another League and makes $10,000.
Player X goes to College and makes $100,000.
The $90,000 premium would not be due to their own NIL.

If they are receiving more by going to college, then the premium they receive is not due to their own NIL, it's due to the NCAA's 100+ years of tradition. How can they still be amateurs when the bulk (theoretically) of the money is not due to their own NIL?
What is happening with NIL in Basketball and Football in many cases is not what it was intended to be used for. It has very predictably become a way to filter money to players above board as opposed to under the table in the high profile sports.

Olympic sport athletes are probably benefitting from it the way it was intended, giving them a chance to make some extra money if they can for legit reasons.
 

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Whatever the market tells a player they are worth, right?
Not in this case.

He agreed to NIL terms, or his "worth", then someone else got more, so he's demanding that he "deserves" more, or he'll bounce.

Let him go. See if he gets what he's "worth" somewhere else.
 



stocker08

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NIL is fine. If a player wants to get jealous and stomp his feet until he either gets what he wants or takes his ball and goes home, that's his deal. It's not a reason to restrict everyone from being able to earn what they are worth, just because this guy is being a baby about it. People who are against NIL are just using this as ammo in their already flawed argument.

Personally....I think the NCAA botched this. Should have had some sort of limit placed on it to keep it from spiraling out of control the way it has. The reason I prefer college sports is because it isn't a professional league where teams buy their roster. Unfortunately we are quickly moving in that direction. And with the immediate transfer rule in place (which I fully support as a one time deal) now.....this is going to become a common occurrence. I'm just hoping that this doesn't happen to us. A player develops into a star and hightails it for a "blue blood" and a big payday. Could very well kill what remained of a competitive balance and level-ish playing field.
 

Gophers1992

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Not in this case.

He agreed to NIL terms, or his "worth", then someone else got more, so he's demanding that he "deserves" more, or he'll bounce.

Let him go. See if he gets what he's "worth" somewhere else.
That's exactly the point. If someone is willing to pay whatever amount he is demanding, then he's worth that. If they won't, he's not.
 

Gophers1992

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Personally....I think the NCAA botched this. Should have had some sort of limit placed on it to keep it from spiraling out of control the way it has. The reason I prefer college sports is because it isn't a professional league where teams buy their roster. Unfortunately we are quickly moving in that direction. And with the immediate transfer rule in place (which I fully support as a one time deal) now.....this is going to become a common occurrence. I'm just hoping that this doesn't happen to us. A player develops into a star and hightails it for a "blue blood" and a big payday. Could very well kill what remained of a competitive balance and level-ish playing field.
I don't think any of us as fans "like" this system, but it's unjust to deny a young man (or woman) the opportunity to monetize their value, even if it lessens the sport in the eyes of some of us fans. The NCAA has no power to limit this, nor should they.
 

bga1

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To your last part, I agree to a point however I don't think any of this will really change the game itself. To the extent I much prefer the way the college game is played to the way the pro game is played so while the NIL/Transfer....stuff will be annoying as a fan it still won't change the fact that the college game is more fun to watch than the pro game for many.
Everyone has their own reasons for what they watch. I personally, love to watch the young guys come in pay their dues and grow into better and better players. Take a Jordan Murphy, for example. He fought through some tough years and stayed with it and got better. The idea that a team will grow together like our 96-97 team or the 81-82 Gophers or the 89-90 Elite 8 club. It is a lot less appealing to just see who we can sign for the coming year and maybe we catch lightning in a bottle.

I hope this whole NIL mess somehow gets tempered otherwise annual free agency is just not as fun and the idea that the players our playing for the glory of our beloved U, just doesn't fly anymore.
 

stocker08

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I don't think any of us as fans "like" this system, but it's unjust to deny a young man (or woman) the opportunity to monetize their value, even if it lessens the sport in the eyes of some of us fans. The NCAA has no power to limit this, nor should they.

That's incorrect. College athletics and the NCAA is a business. If a handful of teams completely demolish any resemblance of competitive balance because they have boosters who can buy the best team.....college athletics suffers as a whole. The athletes themselves have options to not play NCAA college sports if they choose.
 

Gophers1992

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That's incorrect. College athletics and the NCAA is a business. If a handful of teams completely demolish any resemblance of competitive balance because they have boosters who can buy the best team.....college athletics suffers as a whole. The athletes themselves have options to not play NCAA college sports if they choose.
I mean they had a whole Supreme Court case over this didn't they? And they ruled that the NCAA was acting illegally in prohibiting players' ability to earn money.
 

cheeseheadgophfan

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Reminds me of the movie Blue Chips with Shaq.....kids getting houses, money and tractors. LOL

Serious question.....this Wong kid enters the draft or transfers....what happens to that NIL money? He signed some kind of contract, I assume, his worth to Miami is zero if he's playing at Kansas.....
 

GopherPlaya

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My argument is that D-1 athletes are supposed to be unpaid amateurs. I would like to simply see a minor league structure including salaries in place for athletes who are currently only in college to improve their draft position. Lesser athletes who value the education can continue in the NCAA model of old.

These minor league athletes could take all of the endorsements they want in addition to their salary.

The NCAA won't agree as they would lose their cash cows but it would clean up the game and get us out of this facade of amateur players that we are seeing today. I would have argued for this minor league concept decades ago.

The NBA and NFL would never agree to it as the NCAA has always served to groom their future players. If the NCAA went the true amateur model, those leagues would now have to bear these costs.
Why are they supposed to be unpaid amateurs?
 

Gophers1992

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Reminds me of the movie Blue Chips with Shaq.....kids getting houses, money and tractors. LOL

Serious question.....this Wong kid enters the draft or transfers....what happens to that NIL money? He signed some kind of contract, I assume, his worth to Miami is zero if he's playing at Kansas.....
Miami isn't paying him.
 




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