The new Corona virus, should we worry?

Spoofin

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MN Covid-19 Update - Sunday, June 6

data reported by 4:00am the previous day.

Positive cases 559,104 +222. Including probable cases 602,686.

Positive test rate 1.3%.

Health-Care workers with positive cases 42,742 +21.

Cases no longer needing isolation 593,183 +394.

Active cases 2,038 -140.

Deaths 7,052 +3. Including probable deaths 7,465.

Deaths at long-term care and assisted living 4,199 +1. Including probable cases 4,442.

Total patients hospitalized-cumulative 32,229 +21.

Total patients in ICU-cumulative 6,547 +6.

Total PCR tests processed 9,201,066 +16,574. Including antigen testing 10,037,896.

Number of people tested 4,296,765 +11,023.

Nearly 60% of MN deaths at LTC/AL facilities.
 

short ornery norwegian

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Nearly 60% of MN deaths at LTC/AL facilities.
well, patients at those facilities tend to be older with lots of pre-existing conditions, so in that sense, it's not surprising that a lot of the deaths fall into that cohort.

certainly, mistakes were made in the early weeks of the pandemic, and at least some of those deaths might have been preventable, but in the end, an older population with other health problems is going to be more vulnerable no matter where they are living.

FWIW - looked at ratio of deaths to total number of cases reported for different age groups:
70-74 4.4%
75-79 7.9%
80-84 13.6%
85-89 19.9%
90-94 26.3%
95-99 32.7%
100+ 34%

pretty clear progression. the older you are, the greater chance that a positive case of covid-19 will lead to death.
 


Pompous Elitist

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Director Wallensky should probably go back to her day job. Many people are questioning the veracity of the CDC. The recent CDC paper and Walensky’s latest video are cherry-picked data and misleading in almost Ding-ian fashion. Low benefit of treatment, unknown harms (at this time) should equal no mandate - and certainly no coercion and induction of mental anxiety on parents and children.

 

Pompous Elitist

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Similar findings in US but the CDC almost unbelievably failed to point it out.



“The real number of Canadian kids admitted to hospital because of COVID-19 is much lower than the data previously indicated, according to a new report from the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC).

It’s yet another piece of contextual information that should hopefully tamp down concerns and also serve to help the cause of those medical experts and parents eager to get life back to normal for Canadian kids.

“Only 36.6% of pediatric patients hospitalized with COVID-19 were admitted due to an acute respiratory infection,” explains a new report out from PHAC’s Canadian Nosocomial Infection Surveillance Program (CNISP).

The report was quietly released last week. The term nosocomial refers to illnesses that originated within a hospital setting.

This means that out of the number of children previously tallied to have been in hospital with COVID-19, only a third of them were actually in hospital because they were in fact suffering from COVID-19, pneumonia or something similar.

The rest of them were admitted to hospital for some other treatment or procedure and were only confirmed to be positive for the virus due to routine screening of all patients.

“This finding suggests that testing in these children leads to incidental finding of COVID-infection and the relatively mild symptoms seen in children are unlikely to lead to hospitalization,” explains Dr. Douglas P. Mack, an assistant clinical professor at McMaster University who studies pediatric issues, in an email to the Sun.

“The second key finding is that nearly 50% of pediatric patients had pre-existing conditions such as severe neurological disease, lung disease or malignancy, suggesting that overall, healthy children are at very little risk,” adds Dr. Mack.”

 


Pompous Elitist

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He subsequently deleted his account. This is becoming a surreal situation.



 

short ornery norwegian

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Fewer than 2,000 active cases now in MN.

(Beds-in-use site not updated yet as of 1:00pm on Monday.......)

MN Covid-19 Update - Monday, June 7

data reported by 4:00am the previous day.

Positive cases 559,271 +168. Including probable cases 602,880.

Positive test rate 1.9%.

Health-care workers with positive cases 42,757 +15.

Cases no longer needing isolation 593,553 + 370.

Active cases 1,860 -178.

Deaths 7,054 +2. Including probable deaths 7,467.

Deaths at long-term care and assisted living facilities 4,199 (no change). Including probable cases 4,442.

Total patients hospitalized-cumulative 32,243 +14.

Total patients in ICU-cumulative 6,548+1.

Total PCR tests processed 9,209,987 +8,911. Including antigen testing 10,048,275.

Number of people tested 4,303,602 +6,837.

 

short ornery norwegian

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(FWIW - at work, I keep track of cases in 11 area counties in SW MN. today, none of those counties had any new confirmed cases.)

MN Covid-19 Update - Tuesday, June 8

data reported by 4:00am the previous day.

Positive cases 559,379 +107. Including probable cases 603,005.

Positive test rate 1.7%.

Health-Care workers with positive cases 42,761 +4.

Cases no longer needing isolation 593,851 +298.

Active Cases 1,685 -175.

Deaths 7,056 +2. Including probable deaths 7,469.

Deaths at long-term care and assisted living 4,194 (no change). Including probable cases 4,442.

Patients currently Hospitalized 201 -12. Cumulative 32,256 +13.

Patients currently In ICU 57 -2. Cumulative 6,549 +1.

Total PCR tests processed 9,216,135 +6,239. Including antigen testing 10,053,133.

Number of people tested 4,307,643 +4,041.

 

short ornery norwegian

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Beds in Use Update

Saturday
ICU 63 -3
other 182 -4
Total 245 -7

Sunday:
ICU 59 -4
other 163 -19
Total 222 -23

Monday:
ICU 59 (no change)
other 154 -9
Total 213 -9

Tuesday:
ICU 57 -2
other 144 -10
Total 213 -12
 






Go4Broke

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9 Things We Got Totally Wrong About Covid-19

Misconception No. 1: It’s no worse than the flu.

“So last year 37,000 Americans died from the common Flu. It averages between 27,000 and 70,000 per year,” then-President Donald Trump tweeted on March 9, 2020. “Nothing is shut down, life & the economy go on. At this moment there are 546 confirmed cases of CoronaVirus, with 22 deaths. Think about that! ”Turns out, the COVID-19 pandemic has been one of the deadliest events in U.S. history.

Misconception No. 2: Washing hands and surfaces are the most-important preventions.

Experts initially assumed the primary form of COVID-19 transmission was getting the virus on your hands via contaminated surfaces such as door handles, which is how most respiratory diseases are spread. So in addition to social distancing and avoiding crowds, health officials emphasized the importance of hand-washing and wiping down anything people were touching.

By April, researchers came to the growing realization the original theory was wrong and the primary route of infection was probably airborne virus-laden droplets. The federal Centers for Disease Control website now says that “touching surfaces is not thought to be a common way that COVID-19 spreads,” and the primary mode of transmission is breathing the same air as someone who is infectious.

Misconception No. 3: No need for masking.

In the initial weeks of the pandemic, health experts actively discouraged the American public from buying and/or wearing masks. One reason: The pandemic disrupted supply chains and created a mask shortage for health-care workers, and experts didn’t want to exacerbate that shortage. Another factor: Since experts didn’t realize that COVID-19 is primarily transmitted by air, they thought the push to get Americans to mask up would be more trouble than it was worth.

On April 3, President Trump announced the CDC was recommending all Americans wear a mask outside the home. But Trump stressed that the recommendation was voluntary, adding, “I don’t think I’m going to be doing it” -- kicking off a political battle over masks that continues to this day.

Misconception No. 4: Asymptomatic transmission isn’t a big thing.

Initially, experts figured the key to controlling COVID-19 was Infectious Disease Control 101: Identify the sick people and isolate them so they couldn’t infect others. So they were truly shaken when it became apparent that people infected with COVID-19 can transmit the disease for a couple of days before they are sick, and some infected people never show symptoms at all but are still contagious.

“I think the biggest thing with COVID now that shapes all of this guidance on masks is that we can’t tell who’s infected,” Chin-Hong said in that June blog post. “You can’t look in a crowd and say, oh, that person should wear mask. There’s a lot of asymptomatic infection, so everybody has to wear a mask.”

Misconception No. 5: We’ll run out of ventilators.

At the start of the pandemic, many worried aloud the pandemic would reveal a crippling shortage of ventilators. “There aren’t enough ventilators to cope with coronavirus,” said a New York Times headline from March 19, 2020. But doctors soon discovered that many coronavirus patients did not do well on ventilators, and the machines should be used sparingly.

This accompanied another discovery:: While coronavirus initially was seen as a serious but typical respiratory infection, but it turns out the virus can result in a wide range of medical problems, from kidney and/or heart damage, to blood clots that cause strokes, to long-lasting inflammatory issues, to cognitive and neurological symptoms.

Misconception No. 6: It will take more than a year to develop a vaccine.

In early April 2020, White House coronavirus advisor Dr. Anthony Fauci predicted it would take 12 to 18 months to develop a vaccine. To speed the process, the Trump administration unveiled Operation Warp Speed on May 15, a public-private partnership to accelerate the development and manufacturing of coronavirus vaccines.

What also helped to speed the process: Coronavirus was so rampant that clinical trials went faster than expected as enough people in the control group quickly became infected, providing the needed contrast to those who received the trial vaccinations.

The Pfizer vaccine was the first to receive emergency use authorization from the federal Food and Drug Administration. The first shipments of that vaccine -- which is manufactured in Michigan -- went out for distribution on Dec. 13, a mere nine months from the start of the pandemic.

Misconception No. 7: It will go away by Easter. No, by summer. But certainly by the fall.

Especially last spring, it wasn’t just President Trump predicting a quick end to the pandemic. A year ago, almost nobody was predicting the crisis would last so long and create such upheaval.
“I’m a very, very optimistic person,” said Stephanie Hartwell, a sociologist and the dean of Wayne State University’s College of Arts and Sciences. “But the biggest lesson that I’ve learned this past year is that hopeful thinking doesn’t always work out. If you’re an optimist, you’re wrong.”

Misconception No. 8: Rural communities don’t have to worry.

Last March and April, COVID-19 was ravaging several major metropolitan areas, including New York, Detroit, New Orleans, Boston and Chicago. The conventional wisdom then was the pandemic was basically a threat in densely populated areas.

The next 11 months dispelled that idea, as communities large and small found themselves hard-hit by the pandemic. At this point, the Michigan counties with the highest COVID death rates for the past year are Baraga, Iron and Ontonagon, all sparsely populated counties in the Upper Peninsula.

Misconception No. 9: We’ll run out of toilet paper.

Toilet paper was hard to find for a few weeks. But we didn’t run out.

https://www.mlive.com/public-intere...-totally-wrong-about-covid-19-a-year-ago.html
 




short ornery norwegian

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MN Covid-19 Update - Wednesday, June 9

data reported by 4:00am the previous day.

Positive Cases 559,487 +118. Including probable cases 603,144.

Positive test rate 1.4%.

Health-care workers with positive cases 42,769 +8.

Cases no longer needing isolation 594,082 +231.

Active cases 1,585 -100.

Deaths 7,062 +8. Including probable deaths 7,477.

Deaths at long-term care and assisted living 4,202 +3. Including probable cases 4,445.

Patients currently Hospitalized 192 -9. Cumulative 32,302 +46.

Patients currently In ICU 54 -3. Cumulative 6,554 +5.

Total PCR tests processed 9,224,186 +8,476. Including antigen testing 10,065,154.

Number of people tested 4,312,207 +4,564.

 

short ornery norwegian

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MN Covid-19 Update - Thursday, June 10

data reported by 4:00am the previous day.

Positive cases 559,617 +143. Including probable cases 603,305.

Positive test rate 1.0%.

Health-Care workers with positive cases 42,783 +14.

Cases no longer needing isolation 594,204 +122.

Active cases 1,617 +32.

Deaths 7,069 +7. Including probable deaths 7,484.

Deaths at long-term care and assisted living 4,204 +2. Including probable cases 4,447.

Patients currently Hospitalized 203 +11. Cumulative 32,333 +31.

Patients currently In ICU 56 +2. Cumulative 6,563 +9.

Total PCR tests processed 9,238,596 +14,334. Including antigen testing 10,082,495.

Number of people tested 4,320,764 +8,557.

 


short ornery norwegian

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MN Covid-19 Update - Friday, June 11

data reported by 4:00am the previous day.

Positive cases 559,753 +150. Including probable cases 603,466.

Positive test rate 1.0%.

Health-care workers with positive cases 42,797 +14.

Cases no longer needing isolation 594,311 +107.

Active cases 1,659 +42.

Deaths 7,079 +10. Including probable deaths 7,496.

Deaths at long-term care and assisted living 4,211 +7. Including probable cases 4,455.

Patients currently Hospitalized 184 -19. Cumulative 32,361 +28.

Patients currently In ICU 49 -7. Cumulative 6,568 +5.

Total PCR tests processed 9,253,037 +14,579. Including antigen testing 10,099,956.

Number of people tested 4,328,504 +7,740.

 

howeda7

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Small #'s but two days in a row of the active case # going up.
 

short ornery norwegian

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Small #'s but two days in a row of the active case # going up.
But the numbers for hospitalizations and ICU admissions have been trending lower on a fairly steady basis - down to 184 in hospital and 49 in ICU as of Friday morning. that, to me, is the important number, because it reflects the more serious cases.
 



KillerGopherFan

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We were told suicides would be up. They're not, they're down. Drug overdoses, alcohol-related deaths, and suicides have been trending upward for years, but suicides decreased in 2020. It makes the search for a cause a little more complicated.

 

short ornery norwegian

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MN Covid-19 Update - Saturday, June 12

data reported by 4:00am the previous day.

Positive cases 559,880 +151. Including probable cases 603,614.

Positive test rate 1.2%.

Health-Care workers with positive cases 42,809 +12.

Cases no longer needing isolation 594,356 +45.

Active cases 1,755 +96.

Deaths 7,086 +7. Including probable deaths 7,503.

Deaths at long-term care and assisted living 4,211 (no change). Including probable cases 4,455.

Total patients hospitalized-cumulative 32,388 +27.

Total patients in ICU-cumulative 6,570 +2.

Total PCR tests processed 9,265,328 +12,531. Including antigen testing 10,114,531.

Number of people tested 4,335,016 +6,512.

 


KillerGopherFan

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More opportunity to scold DJT, scold vaccine hesitants, exert totalitarian control, and so on.
It doesn’t matter whether things are improving or getting worse. Lefties, like howie, will ALWAYS be able to find the cloud in the silver lining and find something to blame Trump for.
 


howeda7

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It doesn’t matter whether things are improving or getting worse. Lefties, like howie, will ALWAYS be able to find the cloud in the silver lining and find something to blame Trump for.
The only one bringing up Trump are you two idiots.
 

short ornery norwegian

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MN Covid-19 Update - Sunday, June 13

data reported by 4:00am the previous day.

Positive cases 559,995 +139. Including probable cases 603,760.

Positive test rate 1.3%.

Health-care workers with positive cases 42,810 +1.

Cases no longer needing isolation 594,691 +335.

Active cases 1,557 -198.

Deaths 7,095 +9. Including probable deaths 7,512.

Deaths at long-term care and assisted living 4,212 +1. Including probable cases 4,456.

Total patients hospitalized-cumulative 32,412 +24.

Total patients in ICU-cumulative 6,573 +3.

Total PCR tests processed 9,275,751 +10,534. Including antigen testing 10,127,256.

Number of people tested 4,341,776 +6,760.

 

Pompous Elitist

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Skyrocketing from a week ago

/s

The Delta variant caused a scare in 2008, IIRC
 




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