The new Corona virus, should we worry?


MplsGopher

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With roughly equal case counts, more deaths with 65% of the population protected via vaccination than with 0% protected via vaccination?
How the F does that prove Delta is less deadly???
 





short ornery norwegian

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MN Dept of Health Update - Wednesday, Sept 29.

1,662 confirmed cases + 415 from antigen testing = 2,077 new cases
25,075 PCR tests + 10,060 antigen tests = 35,135 tests processed
Positive test rate 6.6% on PCR; 4.1% on antigen --- overall 5.9% positive test rate

31 deaths reported (25 private residence/6 long-term care). 28 deaths from Sept (1 from last November?). total deaths now at 8,140.

Hospitalizations: ICU 206 (+10). Non-ICU 594 (+23). Total Hospitalized 800 (+33).

and as far as why to get vaccinated: (from the Strib)

Sanford Health on Tuesday reported that 12 of 158 COVID-19 patients admitted to its hospitals in the Dakotas and Minnesota were fully vaccinated. However, only two of its 47 COVID-19 patients in intensive care — and none of its 28 patients on ventilators — were vaccinated.
 

Pompous Elitist

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Hospitalizations: ICU 206 (+10). Non-ICU 594 (+23). Total Hospitalized 800 (+33).

and as far as why to get vaccinated: (from the Strib)

Sanford Health on Tuesday reported that 12 of 158 COVID-19 patients admitted to its hospitals in the Dakotas and Minnesota were fully vaccinated. However, only two of its 47 COVID-19 patients in intensive care — and none of its 28 patients on ventilators — were vaccinated.

They're obviously lying for Pfizer/Moderna/NIH/New World Order. The agents are everywhere…

Run, Healthy Skeptic, run! They’re coming!
 







Section2

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Everything looks fine to me. What was the incredible cost? Some businesses went under, I feel for them and would have supported more help for them. Every crisis will chew up and spit out some people. That can't be avoided.

It will take a few more years for me to pass judgement on much of what has gone on.
Wow, it looks fine? I guess I’m not surprised.
 

Section2

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With no lockdowns, mandates, etc., the total deaths at the end of the pandemic would've been 5-10x higher.

Good thing that government can use force and make people do things against their will. Love that. :)
If only there were a country that didn’t lock down and implement mandates, so we could compare and confirm your number….Sweden. You lose.
 



Section2

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Yes. Why not?

Delta has much higher viral loads, like 10x+.

Case counts mean nothing now, I am not sure they ever meant much tbh. With vaccinated people transmitting the virus many probably have minimal symptoms and don't get tested.

I know lots of people who wouldn't want to miss work and would go when sick right now. With the enhanced unemployment, people were fine sitting at home sick.

Most of the world doesn't get sick days, I don't get paid unless I am at work. No sick days, no pto.
How exactly are we calculating 10x viral loads?
 


Wally

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How exactly are we calculating 10x viral loads?
I was conservative with 10x, data says it may be 1000x...

Daily sequential PCR testing of the quarantined subjects indicated that the viral loads of Delta infections, when they first become PCR+, were on average ∼1000 times greater compared to A/B lineage infections during initial epidemic wave in China in early 2020,

 

Spoofin

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MN Dept of Health Update - Wednesday, Sept 29.

1,662 confirmed cases + 415 from antigen testing = 2,077 new cases
25,075 PCR tests + 10,060 antigen tests = 35,135 tests processed
Positive test rate 6.6% on PCR; 4.1% on antigen --- overall 5.9% positive test rate

31 deaths reported (25 private residence/6 long-term care). 28 deaths from Sept (1 from last November?). total deaths now at 8,140.

Hospitalizations: ICU 206 (+10). Non-ICU 594 (+23). Total Hospitalized 800 (+33).

and as far as why to get vaccinated: (from the Strib)

Sanford Health on Tuesday reported that 12 of 158 COVID-19 patients admitted to its hospitals in the Dakotas and Minnesota were fully vaccinated. However, only two of its 47 COVID-19 patients in intensive care — and none of its 28 patients on ventilators — were vaccinated.
That is pretty consistent everywhere that reports. The shot is a great therapuetic.
 


MplsGopher

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Where substantially more people died than Norway and Finland in 2020.


And, not at all an example of free market zero regulation that you masturbate to.

In fact, they are the only European country that won't still won't allow Americans to fly in. They put on severe restrictions about who could come into the country, by government fiat.


If you want to turtle up like New Zealand, that's their decision. The US never could do that.
 

Section2

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Let's hear about your struggles...
It’s not my struggle. My issues are minor. What is the cost of a lost year of school for kids? The cost of masking them for 8 hours every day? The cost of delayed medical intervention? The ongoing and accelerating cost of global supply disruptions? The societal effects from last summer are obvious. I also posted the mental health toll.
Not to mention, I’ve posted in the past the hundreds of thousands of deaths in 3rd world countries because of the pandemic response. So I guess what I’m saying is that everything is fine and it was totally worth it so your grandparents went from a 5% chance of death to under 1%.
 

MplsGopher

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What is the cost of a lost year of school for kids?
Wasn't lost, academically, for most.
The cost of masking them for 8 hours every day?
Nothing
The cost of delayed medical intervention?
Guessing very few had this. Best I can think of off the top of my head is special ed kids whose parents couldn't get that free service out of the local school district that they had relied on before.

Agree that is tough. But the public health of society always outweighs the desired of private individuals. Always and forever.
The ongoing and accelerating cost of global supply disruptions?
You wish it was accelerating. Fantasy. It's of course not. It's correcting, slowly, and price increases will correct themselves once the supply issues are corrected. This is known.
The societal effects from last summer are obvious.
None
I also posted the mental health toll.
Again unfortunate, for a few. Society needs always outweigh.
I’ve posted in the past the hundreds of thousands of deaths in 3rd world countries because of the pandemic response.
:rolleyes:
 



MplsGopher

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So much truth, that I will simply have to post the whole thing and just let it smash your face in with it's thick, beefy dong of objective correctness. Get back to us after you visit the plastic surgeon.


The right to health


The United States owes its existence as a nation partly to an immunization mandate.

In 1777, smallpox was a big enough problem for the bedraggled American army that George Washington thought it could jeopardize the Revolution. An outbreak had already led to one American defeat, at the Battle of Quebec. To prevent more, Washington ordered immunizations — done quietly, so the British would not hear how many Americans were sick — for all troops who had not yet had the virus.

It worked. The number of smallpox cases plummeted, and Washington’s army survived a war of attrition against the world’s most powerful country. The immunization mandate, as Ron Chernow wrote in his 2010 Pulitzer Prize-winning biography of Washington, “was as important as any military measure Washington adopted during the war.”

In the decades that followed, immunization treatments became safer (the Revolutionary War method killed 2 percent or 3 percent of recipients), and mandates became more common, in the military and beyond. They also tended to generate hostility from a small minority of Americans.

A Cambridge, Mass., pastor took his opposition to a smallpox vaccine all the way to the Supreme Court in 1905, before losing. Fifty years later, while most Americans were celebrating the start of a mass vaccination campaign against polio, there were still some dissenters. A United Press wire-service article that ran in newspapers across the country on April 13, 1955, reported:

Hundreds of doctors and registered nurses stood ready to begin the stupendous task of inoculating the millions of children throughout the country.

Some hitches developed, however. In Maryland’s Montgomery County, 4,000 parents flatly refused to let their youngsters receive the vaccine. Two counties in Indiana objected that the plan smacked of socialized medicine.


Many vaccinations, few firings

We are now living through this cycle again. The deadline for many workplace mandates arrived this week, often requiring people to have received a Covid-19 vaccine or face being fired. In California, the deadline for health care workers is today.

As was the case with Washington’s army, the mandates are largely succeeding:

California’s policy has led thousands of previously unvaccinated medical workers to receive shots in recent weeks. At Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles, about 800 additional workers have been vaccinated since the policy was announced last month, bringing the hospital’s vaccination rate to 97 percent, according to my colleague Shawn Hubler.

When New York State announced a mandate for hospital and nursing-home staff members in August, about 75 percent of them had received a shot. By Monday, the share had risen to 92 percent. The increase amounts to roughly 100,000 newly vaccinated people.
At Trinity Health, a hospital chain in 22 states, the increase has been similar — to 94 percent from 75 percent, The Times’s Reed Abelson reports. At Genesis HealthCare, which operates long-term-care facilities in 23 states, Covid cases fell by nearly 50 percent after nearly all staff members had finished receiving shots this summer.

Often, the number of people who ultimately refuse the vaccine is smaller than the number who first say they will. Some are persuaded by the information their employer gives them — about the vaccines’ effectiveness and safety, compared with the deadliness of Covid — and others decide they are not really willing to lose their jobs.

A North Carolina hospital system, Novant Health, last week suspended 375 workers, or about 1 percent of its work force, for being unvaccinated. By the end of the week, more than half of them — about 200 — received a shot and were reinstated.

Of course, 175 firings are not nothing. (A Washington Post headline trumpeted the story as “one of the largest-ever mass terminations due to a vaccine mandate.”) United Airlines said this week that it would terminate even more employees — about 600, or less than 1 percent of its U.S. work force.

These firings can create hardship for the workers and short-term disruptions for their employers. But those disruptions tend to be fleeting, because the percentage of workers is tiny. “I’m not seeing any widespread disruptive effect,” Saad Omer of the Yale Institute for Global Health told The Times.

And the benefits — reducing the spread of a deadly virus and lowering the chances it will mutate dangerously in the future — are large.


Injury to others

The rationale for workplace mandates revolves around those large benefits: Even in a country that prioritizes individual freedom as much as the U.S. does, citizens do not have the right to harm their colleagues or their colleagues’ families, friends and communities. One person’s right to a healthy life is greater than another person’s right to a specific job.

As Carol Silver-Elliott, the chief executive of Jewish Home Family, a senior-care facility in New Jersey, told ABC News about her company’s mandate, “We felt it was a small price to pay to keep our elders safe, and it is something we feel very, very strongly about.”

After I spent some time reading about the history of vaccine mandates, I was struck by how little the debate has changed over the centuries. In 1905, when the Supreme Court ruled against the Massachusetts pastor who did not want to take a smallpox vaccine, Justice John Marshall Harlan explained that the Constitution did not allow Americans always to behave however they chose. “Real liberty for all could not exist,” Harlan wrote in his majority opinion, if people could act “regardless of the injury that may be done to others.”
 




Bob_Loblaw

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It’s not my struggle. My issues are minor. What is the cost of a lost year of school for kids? The cost of masking them for 8 hours every day? The cost of delayed medical intervention? The ongoing and accelerating cost of global supply disruptions? The societal effects from last summer are obvious. I also posted the mental health toll.
Not to mention, I’ve posted in the past the hundreds of thousands of deaths in 3rd world countries because of the pandemic response. So I guess what I’m saying is that everything is fine and it was totally worth it so your grandparents went from a 5% chance of death to under 1%.
No cost. It worked for polio. Speaking of which, when are we all getting polio boosters?
 

Blizzard

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This does explain a bit:

So much truth, that I will simply have to post the whole thing and just let it smash your face in with it's thick, beefy dong of objective correctness.
 





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