R U Seeing Any Shortages?



Spoofin

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As with all of these issues, what is Dementia's plan to help solve the problem?

Oh, that's right, there is no plan.
He said the national guard yesterday. On national tv. Today his handlers say he didn’t mean that. What a clown show this Country is.
 


Wally

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He said the national guard yesterday. On national tv. Today his handlers say he didn’t mean that. What a clown show this Country is.
Why not just let the market solve it?

You want Joe Biden to use the National Guard?
 


Spoofin

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Why not just let the market solve it?

You want Joe Biden to use the National Guard?
No I don’t. Big ticket asked if Joe had a plan so I mentioned he did yesterday - until his handlers took it away.
 

Section2

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Not everything is the governments fault.
Of course it isn’t. This is one that is completely cut and dried and not even arguable. First you say you will own it and then 5 minutes later you’re posting articles about how CEOs reduced investment, which is why store shelves are empty.
 


Wally

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We should let the market solve it. This admin is not going to do that.
How are they stopping the market from solving it?

Of course it isn’t. This is one that is completely cut and dried and not even arguable. First you say you will own it and then 5 minutes later you’re posting articles about how CEOs reduced investment, which is why store shelves are empty.
Own that the supply chain issues are all the governments fault?
Lol

These supply chain issues would be identical if Trump had won.
 



Wally

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Earlier this year, an insistent cry arose from business leaders and Republican governors: Cut off a $300-a-week federal supplement for unemployed Americans. Many people, they argued, would then come off the sidelines and take the millions of jobs that employers were desperate to fill.

Yet three months after half the states began ending that federal payment, there's been no significant influx of job seekers.

In states that cut off the $300 check, the workforce -- the number of people who either have a job or are looking for one -- has risen no more than it has in the states that maintained the payment. That federal aid, along with two jobless aid programs that served gig workers and the long-term unemployed, ended nationally Sept. 6. Yet America's overall workforce actually shrank that month.

'Policymakers were pinning too many hopes on ending unemployment insurance as a labor market boost,' said Fiona Greig, managing director of the JPMorgan Chase Institute, which used JPMorgan bank account data to study the issue. 'The work disincentive effects were clearly small.'
 

kg21

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How are they stopping the market from solving it?


Own that the supply chain issues are all the governments fault?
Lol

These supply chain issues would be identical if Trump had won.
We've been over this before, the border would be the same, the economy would be the same, the gas price would be the same, inflation would be the same, covid would be the same............I'm so glad we got rid that evil last guy so everything could stay the same. :cheer:
 
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Wally

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We've been over this before, the border would be the same, the economy would be the same, the gas price would be the same, inflation would be the same, covid would be the same............I'm so glad we got rid that evil last guy so everything could stay the same. :cheer:
Dipshit Don isn't selling out our country and we are out of Afghanistan. Two big ones that aren't the same.
 

GophersInIowa

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I continue to see a shortage of hair on the top of my head. My 4 year old keeps reminding me that I'm going bald.
 



kg21

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Dipshit Don isn't selling out our country and we are out of Afghanistan. Two big ones that aren't the same.
Dementia Guy isn't selling out our country?

Make this a pay site, Mods. There is no better comedy on this entire planet.
 



Spoofin

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Dipshit Don isn't selling out our country and we are out of Afghanistan. Two big ones that aren't the same.
Over 200 American’s (if you believe THIS count) are not yet “out of Afghanistan”. FYI.
 

Spoofin

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Earlier this year, an insistent cry arose from business leaders and Republican governors: Cut off a $300-a-week federal supplement for unemployed Americans. Many people, they argued, would then come off the sidelines and take the millions of jobs that employers were desperate to fill.

Yet three months after half the states began ending that federal payment, there's been no significant influx of job seekers.

In states that cut off the $300 check, the workforce -- the number of people who either have a job or are looking for one -- has risen no more than it has in the states that maintained the payment. That federal aid, along with two jobless aid programs that served gig workers and the long-term unemployed, ended nationally Sept. 6. Yet America's overall workforce actually shrank that month.

'Policymakers were pinning too many hopes on ending unemployment insurance as a labor market boost,' said Fiona Greig, managing director of the JPMorgan Chase Institute, which used JPMorgan bank account data to study the issue. 'The work disincentive effects were clearly small.'
You try too hard Wally. At least this attempt wasn’t nearly as weak as your last attempt when you posted about all those people “leaving thier job” (w/o realizing they were talking about those switching jobs) IALTO. Did you read this article? Lots of statements, very low on data, and mainly references to old reports. My God - BLS data doesn’t even exist yet for all of the “three month period” they are referencing (which is why it’s based on “AP reporting” and doesn’t list hard numbers.) LOL.

Try using actual BLS data to make your case. Try common sense. Open jobs dropped in August for the first time this year. That was only the 2nd full month since those 26-states removed their $300. This isn’t hard (for most) to figure out. Hell, even what you posted sums it up well…

The $300-a-week federal check, on top of regular state jobless aid, meant that many of the unemployed received more in benefits than they earned at their old jobs.

Yet for some mind-boggling reason you like to pretend this wouldn’t cause folks to choose not to work. 🙄
 


Wally

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Over 200 American’s (if you believe THIS count) are not yet “out of Afghanistan”. FYI.
OMG...

No I don't really care. Why the f did they go to Afganistan?
 


Spoofin

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Yes they would be. People aren't going back to work, you are eating crow.
Well, if you ignore BLS data and you don’t believe people will choose to sit on their ass over working if they can make the same/more to do so - then yeah, you are making great points.
 

Spoofin

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OMG...

No I don't really care. Why the f did they go to Afganistan?
I know you don’t care. You’ll probably laugh at any of them that die - just like you laugh at any unvaxed person that dies. Oh, but you really want wealth re-redistribution because you care about people and aren’t selfish. 🙄
 

Gopher_In_NYC

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The empty shelves were seeing coming out of California are the results of California's version of the "Green New Deal". There are so many problems packed into it that this was inevitable, and predicted by just about everyone with a brain.

The rules outlawed over half the semi-trucks in the country for being too old/not fuel efficient enough. New semi-trucks are incredibly expensive, and since all semis will have to be electric by I believe 2030, what's the point? Remember the 'gig worker' law in California that most assocciated with Uber/Amazon? Turns out half the truckers in the country are independent operators who run loads for big companies. Those have been outlawed now in California as well.

It's been building up for some time, and only becoming noticeable now. It's like a ship taking on water. At first it's hard to notice, but once the vessel becomes water-logged, it sinks quickly.

Now add to it the longshoremen and crane operators staging a sick-out, to protest the ridiculous Vaxx mandates, and we've got a problem that is intensifying, and won't be going away anytime soon.

Also, buy your Xmas presents now! If the Biden Admin continues on with this insane Vaxx mandate, things will get much, much worse. Were already seeing commercial airline pilots across the country staging sick-outs, which are grinding air traffic to a crawl, and you can expect the same dynamic to occur with air freight as well. It won't just be Southwest, American, Alaska, & Spirit pilots who shut things down over these Vax mandates, but soon UPS, FedEx, Amazon pilots will do the same. I have friends in management at US Foods, and they say their drivers are going to walk when the Vax mandates begin. How about UPS/Fedex/Amazon drivers all staging sick-outs the month before Xmas? You think that can't happen? How about when owner operator truck drivers decide they will simply not deliver to Blue states/cities that enforce this madness? Prepare yourselves, there's a storm brewing.
It’s the Hyperbolic Hack - I crown thee with a New Nickname! You’re so scared for someone so “macho.” Do tell, who overcompensates more, Thou are The Konstruction King?
 

Wally

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I know you don’t care. You’ll probably laugh at any of them that die - just like you laugh at any unvaxed person that dies. Oh, but you really want wealth re-redistribution because you care about people and aren’t selfish. 🙄
I care about a just society.

Random idiots doing certain things have no bearing on this, ie civilian's going into war zones and antivaxxer idiots.

For the same reason I don't give a shit about some idiot who dies car surfing or doing the latest ticktock challenge. I laugh at them.

I never claimed to be perfect.
🤷🏼‍♂️
 

Spoofin

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I care about a just society.

Random idiots doing certain things have no bearing on this, ie civilian's going into war zones and antivaxxer idiots.

For the same reason I don't give a shit about some idiot who dies car surfing or doing the latest ticktock challenge.
Why do you think civilians would go into a war zone? For fun? Family, business, or humanitarian reasons are the only ones that I can think of. Yeah, random idiots.
 

Wally

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Why do you think civilians would go into a war zone? For fun? Family, business, or humanitarian reasons are the only ones that I can think of. Yeah, random idiots.
I support anything the government does to get them out, but not keeping the war going for them. I don't hear much about the tens of thousands of locals who die as collateral damage to our bs
 

kg21

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I support anything the government does to get them out, but not keeping the war going for them. I don't hear much about the tens of thousands of locals who die as collateral damage to our bs
We weren't at war. We were occupying.

You liberals are always so dramatic.
 

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Schafer, STrib:

...

Scott MacDonald of Edina-based Mac & Mac, Inc. represents manufacturers to retailers, including clients in China. Last week, he walked me through a lot of the problems faced by Chinese managers with 30% or more sales growth.

Materials costs are up a lot, for one thing. A common plastic used in many consumer products costs about 60% more than it did prior to the boom. One of his manufacturers has 115 separate suppliers, and 92 of them have recently raised their prices.

In China, manufacturers are facing electric power outages. Authorities are using power restrictions, MacDonald's clients told him, to reduce the boom's distorting effects on the broader Chinese economy.

It might then be tempting to blame our supply-chain problems on globalization. But supply chains are hardly a new thing.

A manufacturer of any size 40 or 50 years ago likely outsourced work, buying materials, parts and subassemblies from a network of suppliers.

The principles of running an effective supply chain haven't changed that much, but the distances sure have. It's a two-and-a-half to three-week sail from China to the San Pedro Bay container ports in Los Angeles and Long Beach. That big ocean has become a big bottleneck.

As a result, shipping costs have climbed almost out of sight.

Before the pandemic, a Chinese manufacturer would have paid about $5,600 to ship a full, 40-foot-long "high cube" container from China to a customer's loading dock here.

Now, MacDonald said, that will cost around $32,000.

Shipping companies are giving space to those willing to pay more. One of MacDonald's clients had its containers pulled off the ship at a port-of-call partway to America because another company was willing to pay more for the space.

The cost of shipping some products, an artificial Christmas tree in one case, now exceeds the price a company charges customers. That's why many retailers are raising consumer prices. A sofa made by one of Mac & Mac's clients has gone from $699 to $799 to $1,199 at Menards.

Then, there's a cascading series of hassles that have worsened delays, like container ships anchored offshore for weeks with no place to dock. Or Union Pacific's decision to no longer carry shipping containers to Chicago because the railroad had nowhere to stash the empty ones.

And, of course, there was a truck driver shortage even before the pandemic.

American retailers might sound confident that they'll find a way to manage through this because they really think they can, but it's unlikely they've seen anything quite like this before.

This situation reminds me of a story told in a now-classic business book called "The Goal," first published nearly 40 years ago.

"The Goal," written as a fictional page-turner, has to be one of the oddest management books ever published.

The main character of this novel is a plant manager with problems, large and small. He has a brainy friend to advise him. Yet, with his team, he really figures it out for himself. One moment of clarity for the plant manager came while leading a Boy Scout hike.

One scout, Herbie, was slow. Other kids moved ahead and then had to wait. The process — a chain of kids, spread along a trail — had a constraint, and it was Herbie. Eventually, they figured out how to lighten Herbie's pack and they all settled in to move efficiently at his pace.

That's the story executives might want to tell about stressed-out supply chains. There's just a bunch of Herbies popping up, and we know how to lighten the load or work around them.

But what would've happened to this little troop on the trail if it'd been required to do the whole hike at a jog? It wouldn't have been just one kid who struggled to keep up.

That's what we have here now, one supply chain after another being forced to run instead of walk.


Asked what the long-term fix is, MacDonald hesitated a second before answering.

"Retail prices have to go through the roof," he said. "And then the consumer stops spending."
 

Gopher_In_NYC

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Wells Fargo CEO says supply chains 'will get solved' in '6-to-12 months'​



The situation in which employers find it hard to hire and the supply chain crisis forces businesses to hike prices is likely to persist for at least 6 to 12 months, one bank chief said.

"The realities of things like... wage pressures... supply chain pressures... all these things are going to continue to contribute to this wage inflation that we're seeing," Wells Fargo CEO and President Charles Scharf told Yahoo Finance's Andy Serwer at the annual Milken Institute Global Conference.

Noting that supermarkets are already forecasting higher prices, Scharf added that while "that's all very, very real, ... all these things will level out. Supply chains will get solved, I personally just think it's going to be six-to-12 months.

companies have begun introducing price increases on household products, economists continue to debate whether the inflation that the U.S. economy is experiencing is transitory or not.

One of the factors pushing inflation higher is the supply chain fiasco the country is experiencing, which has been affecting various goods. With many containers stranded at sea and trucking routes clogged, experts anticipate that these problems will iron themselves out.

But they disagree on exactly when those pressures will ease.

Siemens USA CEO Barbara Humpton told Serwer at the Milken conference on Monday that her supply chain professionals are expecting disruptions through 2022.
 




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