Natural Immunity is better than the vaccine

GopherWeatherGuy

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Why such a push to vaccinate people who don’t really need it and ignore natural immunity?

As always, follow the money.


Covid vaccine profits mint 9 new pharma billionaires​


 

bga1

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I read the article. I can't find that in there.
Taking the vaccine is always risky. This is a vaccine that is uncharted, has no known future and is a serious health risk. It is a risk you absolutely should not take if you already have a better version of the protection the vaccine offers. I guess I didn't count on the reader lacking in common sense. I should have.
 



short ornery norwegian

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I have a niece who works in the medical field - a radiologist and mammography tech. She refused to be vaccinated. and yes, she wound up testing positive. didn't get too sick, but had to quarantine. Luckily, she got cleared to travel just a few days before her brother's wedding.

I talked to her at the reception and she still wants nothing to do with the vaccine.

My feeling is that the vaccine has generally been shown to be safe, and appears to be very effective. So I was vaccinated - to protect myself and other people I come into contact with.

Maybe I didn't really need it, but I would rather take it and not need it as opposed to need it and not take it.

I also have a prior heart condition, and my doctor recommended that I be vaccinated.
 


Plausible Deniability

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I had Covid a few months ago. The only reason I would get the vaccine is to make it easier to get into Hawaii .
Pretty much where I'm at, outside of substituting getting into sporting events (or whatever other idiotic mandates they dream up) for going to Hawaii.
 

Gopher_In_NYC

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The left loves control. That's all they care about. It's all Communists ever care about. The Chinese & the Democrats worked this thing together. Covid was never as lethal as advertised. They created financial incentives for hospitals/elder care facilities to label deaths as Covid, and predictably they did. They attributed tens of thousands, perhaps hundreds of thousands of deaths to Covid without ever testing for it, and attributed tens, or even hundreds of thousands of deaths more to Covid, only testing after the person had died of something else. The numbers were intentionally cooked from the get-go.

Masks and social distancing did nothing to limit the virus. The vaccine isn't responsible for the big drop in cases/deaths in 2021 either, it's the testing methods that were changed back in January/February. The Covid PCR test was using 45 cycles, and after Biden took over the CDC lowered the testing to only 33/35 cycles, which predictably dropped the # of cases & deaths dramatically. In addition to changing the way we test for Covid, they also changed they way we calculate the positive cases.

The vaccine is unnecessary, and nothing more than a profit vehicle for the multinational corporations, and a control mechanism for the Communists posing as Democrats.
1622196293300.png

HELP IS AVAILABLE
 

Spoofin

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I have a niece who works in the medical field - a radiologist and mammography tech. She refused to be vaccinated. and yes, she wound up testing positive. didn't get too sick, but had to quarantine. Luckily, she got cleared to travel just a few days before her brother's wedding.

I talked to her at the reception and she still wants nothing to do with the vaccine.

My feeling is that the vaccine has generally been shown to be safe, and appears to be very effective. So I was vaccinated - to protect myself and other people I come into contact with.

Maybe I didn't really need it, but I would rather take it and not need it as opposed to need it and not take it.

I also have a prior heart condition, and my doctor recommended that I be vaccinated.
This is a great post SON. You thought about it, talked to your doctor, and made the right decision for you. I never spoke to a doctor but got the vaccine for the other reasons you listed.

May I ask why your niece wants nothing to do with the vaccine? Oh, you might need to keep her away from @justthefacts and @howeda7 now that her decision is out there.
 

Section2

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I have a niece who works in the medical field - a radiologist and mammography tech. She refused to be vaccinated. and yes, she wound up testing positive. didn't get too sick, but had to quarantine. Luckily, she got cleared to travel just a few days before her brother's wedding.

I talked to her at the reception and she still wants nothing to do with the vaccine.

My feeling is that the vaccine has generally been shown to be safe, and appears to be very effective. So I was vaccinated - to protect myself and other people I come into contact with.

Maybe I didn't really need it, but I would rather take it and not need it as opposed to need it and not take it.

I also have a prior heart condition, and my doctor recommended that I be vaccinated.
At your age, it’s a no brainer. If you are under 30, it’s not a no brainer.
 



saintpaulguy

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Taking the vaccine is always risky. This is a vaccine that is uncharted, has no known future and is a serious health risk. It is a risk you absolutely should not take if you already have a better version of the protection the vaccine offers. I guess I didn't count on the reader lacking in common sense. I should have.
Is a serious health risk? That isn’t in the article either. If you wanna believe, fine, but if you are trying to convince others, you may want to provide a source that includes your assertion, or post it as something you have come to believe on your own.

Or, don’t scold me for not reading the link.
 


justthefacts

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If you had Covid, chances are you have long term immunity. Do not take the vaccine- which is risky and unproven for the long term.

I hope nobody would go so far as to suggest that Republicans are a significant impediment to widespread vaccination in this country.
 

stocker08

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Look....if you don't want the vaccine....don't get it. Fortunately more people than not are willing.
 



saintpaulguy

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For marketing purposes, I say we start calling it the Trump vaccine. He deserves credit, and it will be good branding for the hesitant.
 

KillerGopherFan

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For marketing purposes, I say we start calling it the Trump vaccine. He deserves credit, and it will be good branding for the hesitant.
I suggested that months before the election. You late to the party.

Biden would just change it to the Biden-vax-cin-NAAAATION anyway.
 

Section2

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I hope nobody would go so far as to suggest that Republicans are a significant impediment to widespread vaccination in this country.
We’ve already achieved widespread vaccination.
 

saintpaulguy

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Taking the vaccine is always risky. This is a vaccine that is uncharted, has no known future and is a serious health risk. It is a risk you absolutely should not take if you already have a better version of the protection the vaccine offers. I guess I didn't count on the reader lacking in common sense. I should have.
To answer your question, though, data suggests there is benefit to getting immunized after infection. In fact, it appears to the BEST immunity, possibly lifetime.



Immunity to the Coronavirus May Persist for Years, Scientists Find​

Important immune cells survive in the bone marrow of people who were infected with the virus or were inoculated against it, new research suggests.

By Apoorva Mandavilli
May 26, 2021
Leer en español
Immunity to the coronavirus lasts at least a year, possibly a lifetime, improving over time especially after vaccination, according to two new studies. The findings may help put to rest lingering fears that protection against the virus will be short-lived.
Together, the studies suggest that most people who have recovered from Covid-19 and who were later immunized will not need boosters. Vaccinated people who were never infected most likely will need the shots, however, as will a minority who were infected but did not produce a robust immune response.
Both reports looked at people who had been exposed to the coronavirus about a year earlier. Cells that retain a memory of the virus persist in the bone marrow and may churn out antibodies whenever needed, according to one of the studies, published on Monday in the journal Nature.
The other study, posted online at BioRxiv, a site for biology research, found that these so-called memory B cells continue to mature and strengthen for at least 12 months after the initial infection.
“The papers are consistent with the growing body of literature that suggests that immunity elicited by infection and vaccination for SARS-CoV-2 appears to be long-lived,” said Scott Hensley, an immunologist at the University of Pennsylvania who was not involved in the research.
The studies may soothe fears that immunity to the virus is transient, as is the case with coronaviruses that cause common colds. But those viruses change significantly every few years, Dr. Hensley said. “The reason we get infected with common coronaviruses repetitively throughout life might have much more to do with variation of these viruses rather than immunity,” he said.

In fact, memory B cells produced in response to infection with SARS-CoV-2 and enhanced with vaccination are so potent that they thwart even variants of the virus, negating the need for boosters, according to Michel Nussenzweig, an immunologist at Rockefeller University in New York who led the study on memory maturation.
“People who were infected and get vaccinated really have a terrific response, a terrific set of antibodies, because they continue to evolve their antibodies,” Dr. Nussenzweig said. “I expect that they will last for a long time.”
The result may not apply to protection derived from vaccines alone, because immune memory is likely to be organized differently after immunization, compared with that following natural infection.

That means people who have not had Covid-19 and have been immunized may eventually need a booster shot, Dr. Nussenzweig said. “That’s the kind of thing that we will know very, very soon,” he said.

Upon first encountering a virus, B cells rapidly proliferate and produce antibodies in large amounts. Once the acute infection is resolved, a small number of the cells take up residence in the bone marrow, steadily pumping out modest levels of antibodies.
To look at memory B cells specific to the new coronavirus, researchers led by Ali Ellebedy of Washington University in St. Louis analyzed blood from 77 people at three-month intervals, starting about a month after their infection with the coronavirus. Only six of the 77 had been hospitalized for Covid-19; the rest had mild symptoms.
Antibody levels in these individuals dropped rapidly four months after infection and continued to decline slowly for months afterward — results that are in line with those from other studies.
Some scientists have interpreted this decrease as a sign of waning immunity, but it is exactly what’s expected, other experts said. If blood contained high quantities of antibodies to every pathogen the body had ever encountered, it would quickly transform into a thick sludge.
Instead, blood levels of antibodies fall sharply following acute infection, while memory B cells remain quiescent in the bone marrow, ready to take action when needed.

The studies found memory B cells produced in response to Covid infection and enhanced with a vaccine were so potent that they thwart even variants of the virus, negating a need for boosters.Credit...Saul Martinez for The New York Times
Dr. Ellebedy’s team obtained bone marrow samples from 19 people roughly seven months after they had been infected. Fifteen had detectable memory B cells, but four did not, suggesting that some people might carry very few of the cells or none at all.

“It tells me that even if you got infected, it doesn’t mean that you have a super immune response,” Dr. Ellebedy said. The findings reinforce the idea that people who have recovered from Covid-19 should be vaccinated, he said.
Five of the participants in Dr. Ellebedy’s study donated bone marrow samples seven or eight months after they were initially infected and again four months later. He and his colleagues found that the number of memory B cells remained stable over that time.
The results are particularly noteworthy because it is difficult to get bone marrow samples, said Jennifer Gommerman, an immunologist at the University of Toronto who was not involved in the work.
A landmark study in 2007 showed that antibodies in theory could survive decades, perhaps even well beyond the average life span, hinting at the long-term presence of memory B cells. But the new study offered a rare proof of their existence, Dr. Gommerman said.
Dr. Nussenzweig’s team looked at how memory B cells mature over time. The researchers analyzed blood from 63 people who had recovered from Covid-19 about a year earlier. The vast majority of the participants had mild symptoms, and 26 had also received at least one dose of either the Moderna or the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine.
So-called neutralizing antibodies, needed to prevent reinfection with the virus, remained unchanged between six and 12 months, while related but less important antibodies slowly disappeared, the team found.
As memory B cells continued to evolve, the antibodies they produced developed the ability to neutralize an even broader group of variants. This ongoing maturation may result from a small piece of the virus that is sequestered by the immune system — for target practice, so to speak.
A year after infection, neutralizing activity in the participants who had not been vaccinated was lower against all forms of the virus, with the greatest loss seen against the variant first identified in South Africa.
Vaccination significantly amplified antibody levels, confirming results from other studies; the shots also ramped up the body’s neutralizing ability by about 50-fold.
Senator Rand Paul, Republican of Kentucky, said on Sunday that he would not get a coronavirus vaccine because he had been infected in March of last year and was therefore immune.
But there is no guarantee that such immunity will be powerful enough to protect him for years, particularly given the emergence of variants of the coronavirus that can partially sidestep the body’s defenses.
The results of Dr. Nussenzweig’s study suggest that people who have recovered from Covid-19 and who have later been vaccinated will continue to have extremely high levels of protection against emerging variants, even without receiving a vaccine booster down the line.
“It kind of looks exactly like what we would hope a good memory B cell response would look like,” said Marion Pepper, an immunologist at the University of Washington in Seattle who was not involved in the new research.

The experts all agreed that immunity is likely to play out very differently in people who have never had Covid-19. Fighting a live virus is different from responding to a single viral protein introduced by a vaccine. And in those who had Covid-19, the initial immune response had time to mature over six to 12 months before being challenged by the vaccine.
“Those kinetics are different than someone who got immunized and then gets immunized again three weeks later,” Dr. Pepper said. “That’s not to say that they might not have as broad a response, but it could be very different.”
 

saintpaulguy

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We’ve already achieved widespread vaccination.
I do think we will eventually reach 70 percent. There will be pockets with 90 percent, and there will be pockets at much less. We are already out of the wide spread panic stage, and with plenty of vaccine available, if there are flare ups in hesitant pockets, people who want to be protected will be, and people who don't can roll the dice.
People who can not be vaccinated will not in many places be offered herd immunity, and will need to behave accordingly.
 

Zeppelin Gopher

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I had COVID in October. Had an antibody test last week, still positive for the AB's 7 months later.

I'm 37 years old, keep myself in good shape, exercise a lot, spend lots of time outdoors/in the sun, try to eat well. Relatively healthy (besides the regular liver abuse).

I take responsibility for my own health and manage my own risks. Between that and natural immunity from previous infection, there is zero chance I'll be getting the vaccine anytime soon.
 

Zeppelin Gopher

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I had Covid a few months ago. The only reason I would get the vaccine is to make it easier to get into Hawaii .
Same- if eventually required to get into a country/travel the world, I'll begrudgingly get the shot.
 

diehard

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Same- if eventually required to get into a country/travel the world, I'll begrudgingly get the shot.
This whole fraudulent response will be finally outed at some point. SARS 2 was patented in the US in 2007. It is viewable on the US Patent website. It was transferred to China expressly for "gain of function." Fauci and BigMed and BigPharma have enabled China to kill a lot of people. Ataching a ptrotein spike was that big a deal. This is just a dry run. Mass depopulation is on the way. Good luck with your vaccinations. The real stuff is coming that hasn't had a "vaccine" for a decade.
 

boofbonser

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This whole fraudulent response will be finally outed at some point. SARS 2 was patented in the US in 2007. It is viewable on the US Patent website. It was transferred to China expressly for "gain of function." Fauci and BigMed and BigPharma have enabled China to kill a lot of people. Ataching a ptrotein spike was that big a deal. This is just a dry run. Mass depopulation is on the way. Good luck with your vaccinations. The real stuff is coming that hasn't had a "vaccine" for a decade.
Cool, looking forward to it.
 

Gopher_In_NYC

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This whole fraudulent response will be finally outed at some point. SARS 2 was patented in the US in 2007. It is viewable on the US Patent website. It was transferred to China expressly for "gain of function." Fauci and BigMed and BigPharma have enabled China to kill a lot of people. Ataching a ptrotein spike was that big a deal. This is just a dry run. Mass depopulation is on the way. Good luck with your vaccinations. The real stuff is coming that hasn't had a "vaccine" for a decade.
If true Live Soft then why wouldn't you provide a link to said patent?

OR

Is this more or your usual Air National Guard BS?
 
Last edited:


Gopher_In_NYC

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To answer your question, though, data suggests there is benefit to getting immunized after infection. In fact, it appears to the BEST immunity, possibly lifetime.



Immunity to the Coronavirus May Persist for Years, Scientists Find​

Important immune cells survive in the bone marrow of people who were infected with the virus or were inoculated against it, new research suggests.

By Apoorva Mandavilli
May 26, 2021
Leer en español
Immunity to the coronavirus lasts at least a year, possibly a lifetime, improving over time especially after vaccination, according to two new studies. The findings may help put to rest lingering fears that protection against the virus will be short-lived.
Together, the studies suggest that most people who have recovered from Covid-19 and who were later immunized will not need boosters. Vaccinated people who were never infected most likely will need the shots, however, as will a minority who were infected but did not produce a robust immune response.
Both reports looked at people who had been exposed to the coronavirus about a year earlier. Cells that retain a memory of the virus persist in the bone marrow and may churn out antibodies whenever needed, according to one of the studies, published on Monday in the journal Nature.
The other study, posted online at BioRxiv, a site for biology research, found that these so-called memory B cells continue to mature and strengthen for at least 12 months after the initial infection.
“The papers are consistent with the growing body of literature that suggests that immunity elicited by infection and vaccination for SARS-CoV-2 appears to be long-lived,” said Scott Hensley, an immunologist at the University of Pennsylvania who was not involved in the research.
The studies may soothe fears that immunity to the virus is transient, as is the case with coronaviruses that cause common colds. But those viruses change significantly every few years, Dr. Hensley said. “The reason we get infected with common coronaviruses repetitively throughout life might have much more to do with variation of these viruses rather than immunity,” he said.

In fact, memory B cells produced in response to infection with SARS-CoV-2 and enhanced with vaccination are so potent that they thwart even variants of the virus, negating the need for boosters, according to Michel Nussenzweig, an immunologist at Rockefeller University in New York who led the study on memory maturation.
“People who were infected and get vaccinated really have a terrific response, a terrific set of antibodies, because they continue to evolve their antibodies,” Dr. Nussenzweig said. “I expect that they will last for a long time.”
The result may not apply to protection derived from vaccines alone, because immune memory is likely to be organized differently after immunization, compared with that following natural infection.

That means people who have not had Covid-19 and have been immunized may eventually need a booster shot, Dr. Nussenzweig said. “That’s the kind of thing that we will know very, very soon,” he said.

Upon first encountering a virus, B cells rapidly proliferate and produce antibodies in large amounts. Once the acute infection is resolved, a small number of the cells take up residence in the bone marrow, steadily pumping out modest levels of antibodies.
To look at memory B cells specific to the new coronavirus, researchers led by Ali Ellebedy of Washington University in St. Louis analyzed blood from 77 people at three-month intervals, starting about a month after their infection with the coronavirus. Only six of the 77 had been hospitalized for Covid-19; the rest had mild symptoms.
Antibody levels in these individuals dropped rapidly four months after infection and continued to decline slowly for months afterward — results that are in line with those from other studies.
Some scientists have interpreted this decrease as a sign of waning immunity, but it is exactly what’s expected, other experts said. If blood contained high quantities of antibodies to every pathogen the body had ever encountered, it would quickly transform into a thick sludge.
Instead, blood levels of antibodies fall sharply following acute infection, while memory B cells remain quiescent in the bone marrow, ready to take action when needed.

The studies found memory B cells produced in response to Covid infection and enhanced with a vaccine were so potent that they thwart even variants of the virus, negating a need for boosters.Credit...Saul Martinez for The New York Times
Dr. Ellebedy’s team obtained bone marrow samples from 19 people roughly seven months after they had been infected. Fifteen had detectable memory B cells, but four did not, suggesting that some people might carry very few of the cells or none at all.

“It tells me that even if you got infected, it doesn’t mean that you have a super immune response,” Dr. Ellebedy said. The findings reinforce the idea that people who have recovered from Covid-19 should be vaccinated, he said.
Five of the participants in Dr. Ellebedy’s study donated bone marrow samples seven or eight months after they were initially infected and again four months later. He and his colleagues found that the number of memory B cells remained stable over that time.
The results are particularly noteworthy because it is difficult to get bone marrow samples, said Jennifer Gommerman, an immunologist at the University of Toronto who was not involved in the work.
A landmark study in 2007 showed that antibodies in theory could survive decades, perhaps even well beyond the average life span, hinting at the long-term presence of memory B cells. But the new study offered a rare proof of their existence, Dr. Gommerman said.
Dr. Nussenzweig’s team looked at how memory B cells mature over time. The researchers analyzed blood from 63 people who had recovered from Covid-19 about a year earlier. The vast majority of the participants had mild symptoms, and 26 had also received at least one dose of either the Moderna or the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine.
So-called neutralizing antibodies, needed to prevent reinfection with the virus, remained unchanged between six and 12 months, while related but less important antibodies slowly disappeared, the team found.
As memory B cells continued to evolve, the antibodies they produced developed the ability to neutralize an even broader group of variants. This ongoing maturation may result from a small piece of the virus that is sequestered by the immune system — for target practice, so to speak.
A year after infection, neutralizing activity in the participants who had not been vaccinated was lower against all forms of the virus, with the greatest loss seen against the variant first identified in South Africa.
Vaccination significantly amplified antibody levels, confirming results from other studies; the shots also ramped up the body’s neutralizing ability by about 50-fold.
Senator Rand Paul, Republican of Kentucky, said on Sunday that he would not get a coronavirus vaccine because he had been infected in March of last year and was therefore immune.
But there is no guarantee that such immunity will be powerful enough to protect him for years, particularly given the emergence of variants of the coronavirus that can partially sidestep the body’s defenses.
The results of Dr. Nussenzweig’s study suggest that people who have recovered from Covid-19 and who have later been vaccinated will continue to have extremely high levels of protection against emerging variants, even without receiving a vaccine booster down the line.
“It kind of looks exactly like what we would hope a good memory B cell response would look like,” said Marion Pepper, an immunologist at the University of Washington in Seattle who was not involved in the new research.

The experts all agreed that immunity is likely to play out very differently in people who have never had Covid-19. Fighting a live virus is different from responding to a single viral protein introduced by a vaccine. And in those who had Covid-19, the initial immune response had time to mature over six to 12 months before being challenged by the vaccine.
“Those kinetics are different than someone who got immunized and then gets immunized again three weeks later,” Dr. Pepper said. “That’s not to say that they might not have as broad a response, but it could be very different.”
Per my earlier post in the thread -

 


Gopher_In_NYC

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I do think we will eventually reach 70 percent. There will be pockets with 90 percent, and there will be pockets at much less. We are already out of the wide spread panic stage, and with plenty of vaccine available, if there are flare ups in hesitant pockets, people who want to be protected will be, and people who don't can roll the dice.
People who can not be vaccinated will not in many places be offered herd immunity, and will need to behave accordingly.
Per The Times today -

70 Percent Covid Vaccination Rate May Be in Reach, New Poll Suggests​


A new poll suggests the United States could be on track to vaccinate at least 70 percent of the adult population against Covid-19 by this summer.

In the latest survey by the Kaiser Family Foundation, 62 percent of respondents said they had received at least one dose of a vaccine, up from 56 percent in April. At the same time, about a third of those categorized as “wait and see” reported that they had already made vaccine appointments or planned to do so imminently.

Dr. William Schaffner, medical director of the National Foundation for Infectious Diseases and a vaccine expert, found the results encouraging.
“I think there are many people who were on the fence who were worried about things moving too rapidly and about possible side effects, but those concerns are being allayed as they see more of their friends and acquaintances celebrating getting vaccinated,” said Dr. Schaffner, who was not involved in the monthly survey, the Covid-19 Vaccine Monitor.

“They’re getting that growing sense of comfort and reassurance that ‘people like me’ are getting vaccinated,” which, he said, was essential to instilling confidence in the vaccines.
The two demographic groups reporting the greatest increase in vaccination rates from April to May were Latino adults (from 47 percent to 57 percent) and adults without college degrees (from 48 percent to 55 percent).

The telephone survey of 1,526 adults was conducted in English and Spanish from May 18 through May 25.

On May 10, the Food and Drug Administration authorized the vaccine made by Pfizer and BioNTech for children ages 12 and older. The survey found that 40 percent of parents said that either their child had already gotten at least one dose or would be getting one soon.
But parents of younger children were notably more guarded, with only about a quarter expressing a willingness to get their children vaccinated as soon as the shots become authorized for them.

The finding suggests that efforts to protect as many young students as possible from Covid-19 by the start of the school year could face barriers.
While public health experts welcomed the continuing improvement in vaccination rates, they noted that it meant the pool of the most willing adults was shrinking.

“At this point, there’s almost no low-hanging fruit, but there’s a path toward a slow-but-steady increase in vaccination rates through improved access, information, persuasion and incentives,” said Drew Altman, the president and chief executive of the Kaiser Family Foundation.
President Biden set a goal of 70 percent vaccine coverage for adults by July 4. Dr. Schaffner said he thought the goal was possible. “We have to work harder,” he said.

The authors of the survey said the goal was realistic, because in addition to 62 percent of adults who had received at least one dose, another 4 percent said they wanted the shot as soon as possible, and still another 4 percent — representing a third of the “wait-and-see” group — said they had scheduled an appointment or intended to do so within three months.

But despite the positive news, vaccination rates among adults who have previously reported significant hesitancy (7 percent) or outright refusal (13 percent) have remained static for several months. And a third of the “wait-and-see” group said they would wait at least a year before getting the shots.

The survey also looked at attitudes about vaccination incentives as well as the impact of government messaging about the shots. Financial enticements, such as Ohio’s million-dollar lottery for the newly vaccinated, are receiving some derisive pushback.

But the survey found that such rewards can be successful motivators for people to get the shots. Fifteen percent of unvaccinated adults in the survey said that being offered $100 by their state might make them reconsider, as would free transportation and free tickets to a sporting event or concert.

Earlier this month, people who showed up to be vaccinated at an event at the Talladega Superspeedway in Alabama could take two victory laps around the track. (Cars and trucks, yes; motorcycles, no.) Similar incentives are being offered around the country.
About 20 percent of the unvaccinated workers said they would be more likely to get the shots if their employer gave them paid time off for the appointments and for any time needed to recover from side effects.

The report also showed that the public has some confidence in government health-related messages, though many were confused by the announcement this month by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention saying that vaccinated people could largely eschew face masks and social distancing. Over half said that the C.D.C.’s guidance was generally clear and accessible, but about 40 percent found it confusing and murky.

Strikingly, 85 percent of unvaccinated people said that the C.D.C.’s new guidance did not make them more willing to get vaccinated.

But another cohort looked to government approval as a potential starting gun. The survey found that a third of unvaccinated adults, including 44 percent in the “wait-and-see” group, said they would be more likely to get a vaccine once it received full approval from the Food and Drug Administration. The makers of the Moderna and the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccines have recently said that they are making progress toward that goal.
 


bga1

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To answer your question, though, data suggests there is benefit to getting immunized after infection. In fact, it appears to the BEST immunity, possibly lifetime.



Immunity to the Coronavirus May Persist for Years, Scientists Find​

Important immune cells survive in the bone marrow of people who were infected with the virus or were inoculated against it, new research suggests.

By Apoorva Mandavilli
May 26, 2021
Leer en español
Immunity to the coronavirus lasts at least a year, possibly a lifetime, improving over time especially after vaccination, according to two new studies. The findings may help put to rest lingering fears that protection against the virus will be short-lived.
Together, the studies suggest that most people who have recovered from Covid-19 and who were later immunized will not need boosters. Vaccinated people who were never infected most likely will need the shots, however, as will a minority who were infected but did not produce a robust immune response.
Both reports looked at people who had been exposed to the coronavirus about a year earlier. Cells that retain a memory of the virus persist in the bone marrow and may churn out antibodies whenever needed, according to one of the studies, published on Monday in the journal Nature.
The other study, posted online at BioRxiv, a site for biology research, found that these so-called memory B cells continue to mature and strengthen for at least 12 months after the initial infection.
“The papers are consistent with the growing body of literature that suggests that immunity elicited by infection and vaccination for SARS-CoV-2 appears to be long-lived,” said Scott Hensley, an immunologist at the University of Pennsylvania who was not involved in the research.
The studies may soothe fears that immunity to the virus is transient, as is the case with coronaviruses that cause common colds. But those viruses change significantly every few years, Dr. Hensley said. “The reason we get infected with common coronaviruses repetitively throughout life might have much more to do with variation of these viruses rather than immunity,” he said.

In fact, memory B cells produced in response to infection with SARS-CoV-2 and enhanced with vaccination are so potent that they thwart even variants of the virus, negating the need for boosters, according to Michel Nussenzweig, an immunologist at Rockefeller University in New York who led the study on memory maturation.
“People who were infected and get vaccinated really have a terrific response, a terrific set of antibodies, because they continue to evolve their antibodies,” Dr. Nussenzweig said. “I expect that they will last for a long time.”
The result may not apply to protection derived from vaccines alone, because immune memory is likely to be organized differently after immunization, compared with that following natural infection.

That means people who have not had Covid-19 and have been immunized may eventually need a booster shot, Dr. Nussenzweig said. “That’s the kind of thing that we will know very, very soon,” he said.

Upon first encountering a virus, B cells rapidly proliferate and produce antibodies in large amounts. Once the acute infection is resolved, a small number of the cells take up residence in the bone marrow, steadily pumping out modest levels of antibodies.
To look at memory B cells specific to the new coronavirus, researchers led by Ali Ellebedy of Washington University in St. Louis analyzed blood from 77 people at three-month intervals, starting about a month after their infection with the coronavirus. Only six of the 77 had been hospitalized for Covid-19; the rest had mild symptoms.
Antibody levels in these individuals dropped rapidly four months after infection and continued to decline slowly for months afterward — results that are in line with those from other studies.
Some scientists have interpreted this decrease as a sign of waning immunity, but it is exactly what’s expected, other experts said. If blood contained high quantities of antibodies to every pathogen the body had ever encountered, it would quickly transform into a thick sludge.
Instead, blood levels of antibodies fall sharply following acute infection, while memory B cells remain quiescent in the bone marrow, ready to take action when needed.

The studies found memory B cells produced in response to Covid infection and enhanced with a vaccine were so potent that they thwart even variants of the virus, negating a need for boosters.Credit...Saul Martinez for The New York Times
Dr. Ellebedy’s team obtained bone marrow samples from 19 people roughly seven months after they had been infected. Fifteen had detectable memory B cells, but four did not, suggesting that some people might carry very few of the cells or none at all.

“It tells me that even if you got infected, it doesn’t mean that you have a super immune response,” Dr. Ellebedy said. The findings reinforce the idea that people who have recovered from Covid-19 should be vaccinated, he said.
Five of the participants in Dr. Ellebedy’s study donated bone marrow samples seven or eight months after they were initially infected and again four months later. He and his colleagues found that the number of memory B cells remained stable over that time.
The results are particularly noteworthy because it is difficult to get bone marrow samples, said Jennifer Gommerman, an immunologist at the University of Toronto who was not involved in the work.
A landmark study in 2007 showed that antibodies in theory could survive decades, perhaps even well beyond the average life span, hinting at the long-term presence of memory B cells. But the new study offered a rare proof of their existence, Dr. Gommerman said.
Dr. Nussenzweig’s team looked at how memory B cells mature over time. The researchers analyzed blood from 63 people who had recovered from Covid-19 about a year earlier. The vast majority of the participants had mild symptoms, and 26 had also received at least one dose of either the Moderna or the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine.
So-called neutralizing antibodies, needed to prevent reinfection with the virus, remained unchanged between six and 12 months, while related but less important antibodies slowly disappeared, the team found.
As memory B cells continued to evolve, the antibodies they produced developed the ability to neutralize an even broader group of variants. This ongoing maturation may result from a small piece of the virus that is sequestered by the immune system — for target practice, so to speak.
A year after infection, neutralizing activity in the participants who had not been vaccinated was lower against all forms of the virus, with the greatest loss seen against the variant first identified in South Africa.
Vaccination significantly amplified antibody levels, confirming results from other studies; the shots also ramped up the body’s neutralizing ability by about 50-fold.
Senator Rand Paul, Republican of Kentucky, said on Sunday that he would not get a coronavirus vaccine because he had been infected in March of last year and was therefore immune.
But there is no guarantee that such immunity will be powerful enough to protect him for years, particularly given the emergence of variants of the coronavirus that can partially sidestep the body’s defenses.
The results of Dr. Nussenzweig’s study suggest that people who have recovered from Covid-19 and who have later been vaccinated will continue to have extremely high levels of protection against emerging variants, even without receiving a vaccine booster down the line.
“It kind of looks exactly like what we would hope a good memory B cell response would look like,” said Marion Pepper, an immunologist at the University of Washington in Seattle who was not involved in the new research.

The experts all agreed that immunity is likely to play out very differently in people who have never had Covid-19. Fighting a live virus is different from responding to a single viral protein introduced by a vaccine. And in those who had Covid-19, the initial immune response had time to mature over six to 12 months before being challenged by the vaccine.
“Those kinetics are different than someone who got immunized and then gets immunized again three weeks later,” Dr. Pepper said. “That’s not to say that they might not have as broad a response, but it could be very different.”
They do not have a living clue what the vaccine will do long term. They are 100% hiding problems and deaths that the vaccines are causing. The vaccine does work to reduce infection now. We know much more about the longevity and effectiveness of natural immunity. What could happen with the vaccine, long term, is that it kills you when a new disease comes along.

Consider that they refused to tell you that this thing came out of a Chinese lab and that the Chinese covered it. Consider that 9 people are now new billionaires as a result of the vaccine. There is money and politics all over this and there is zero accountability if it goes bad. They refused to allow therapeutics for a long time because they were afraid it would remove the need for a lucrative vaccine and, let's be honest here, they politically did NOT want a solution during the Trump presidency.

There is so much dishonesty and propaganda surrounding this. There is no way on earth someone who had Covid should take a risk at potentially upgrading their immunity with this risky and unknown vaccine. If this were a normal vaccine we would be two three years away from approval, because of the risk. It is the height of insanity that kids are getting vaccinated.

Covid and the vaccine are both highly politicized. I wish you the best but I certainly hope you begin to wise up. It is a shame to see someone like you waste your brainpower, which you have and instead act like a lemming.
 

justthefacts

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They do not have a living clue what the vaccine will do long term. They are 100% hiding problems and deaths that the vaccines are causing. The vaccine does work to reduce infection now. We know much more about the longevity and effectiveness of natural immunity. What could happen with the vaccine, long term, is that it kills you when a new disease comes along.

Consider that they refused to tell you that this thing came out of a Chinese lab and that the Chinese covered it. Consider that 9 people are now new billionaires as a result of the vaccine. There is money and politics all over this and there is zero accountability if it goes bad. They refused to allow therapeutics for a long time because they were afraid it would remove the need for a lucrative vaccine and, let's be honest here, they politically did NOT want a solution during the Trump presidency.

There is so much dishonesty and propaganda surrounding this. There is no way on earth someone who had Covid should take a risk at potentially upgrading their immunity with this risky and unknown vaccine. If this were a normal vaccine we would be two three years away from approval, because of the risk. It is the height of insanity that kids are getting vaccinated.

Covid and the vaccine are both highly politicized. I wish you the best but I certainly hope you begin to wise up. It is a shame to see someone like you waste your brainpower, which you have and instead act like a lemming.
Why does Dear Leader recommend the vaccine? Is he part of the evil conspiracy?
 




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