Earth's Warming began before the Industrial Revolution

Wally

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Renewables don't work in these weather conditions. They work well in other weather conditions. This is exactly what I said in my original post.

How does renewables generating less than 5% of current demand suggest they are working in this situation?

Obviously we need surge capacity and ideally storage capacity for renewables, not necessarily batteries but things like pumped hydro and others.
 


MplsGopher

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How does renewables generating less than 5% of current demand suggest they are working in this situation?
Is "working" the same as not "not working"? These definitions seem to be floating to suit the needs of who is telling the narrative.
 


Wally

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Texas could now have their own national energy infrastructure if only they had seceded as once suggested.

They already do. Texas has its own grid, seperate from the rest of the US.
 








Texas-Gopher

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Which basic goods would increase in price and why?

Meat is by far more expensive per calorie to consumers to buy and to producers to produce, than vegetable protein. The latter is superior anyway, as far as health and nutrition goes.


American grain feeds the world's poor? Somehow I doubt that.
Let's shut down the coal plants first, then see if we can make it without them.
TG is feeling aggrieved. And cold. Let’s let him vent.
And the company I work for is losing millions as our natural gas providers are forced to shut us off. No problem though, I'm sure our foreign competitors will understand. Not your problem, so it isn't a problem? I'm thinking it will be your problem soon.
 

Wally

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Let's shut down the coal plants first, then see if we can make it without them.

And the company I work for is losing millions as our natural gas providers are forced to shut us off. No problem though, I'm sure our foreign competitors will understand. Not your problem, so it isn't a problem? I'm thinking it will be your problem soon.

Maybe switching all the electric generation to natural gas wasn't a good idea?
Natural gas switch was mostly done because its cheaper, the side benefit was less CO2.

Maybe electric generation should be more regulated. Texas and their state grid is setup to avoid regulation.
 

jovs

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Fake news according to the idiots here.

Currently about 24 days of flooding a year and expected to go to 100-125 in the next 30 years, a flood every three days and it could be a sunny 85 degree day, if that doesn't smack you in the face I don't know what will. Nary even a hint of flooding 35 years ago when I spent a fair amount of time in the area and that included the day before a hurricane hit. The denial is crazy and is about to get very costly.
 

HoustonTXGopher

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This is a far more insightful post than your earlier one. Seems you're starting to realize what you first thought was true was just another big lie spread by RWers and RW media. Good for you.

As for TX, maybe ya'll need to be better prepared for adverse events. Most of the rest of the country takes measures to prevent pipes from bursting in homes (in particular, proper materials and insulation), to ensure electrical and gas supplies. Your state governance, of which the bulk of your populace has long put in power, has long kowtowed to the elites of the oil base and left your infrastructure rot to keep taxes low. Texas also appears to be failing to adjust to the reality that is the changing and exacerbated weather swings caused by the excess energy of global warming. They're likely to get even worse, not better. Maybe this is karma and a wakeup call to Texans. I doubt it. I see your governor and RW media is already trying to blame windfarms, which occupy less than 10% of your electrical generation, disregarding that windfarms are plentiful in far colder climates than Texas. Far colder climates also have backup plans, since wind never works 100% of the time. The reality of your problems is the lack of appropriate infrastructure in TX related to natural gas was the main issue of this disaster.
What happened to Texas, especially south Texas was an anomaly. I would compare it Minnesota having four straight days of heat at 107 degrees. There were multiple factors, but in the end, this global warming was just too brutal.
 





Wally

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What happened to Texas, especially south Texas was an anomaly. I would compare it Minnesota having four straight days of heat at 107 degrees. There were multiple factors, but in the end, this global warming was just too brutal.

Gobal warming is thought to have triggered the polar vortex to wabble which caused the cold in texas. I bet there were areas north of the artic circle that were warmer than Texas. That is basically unheard of in the middle of winter.
 

cncmin

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What happened to Texas, especially south Texas was an anomaly. I would compare it Minnesota having four straight days of heat at 107 degrees. There were multiple factors, but in the end, this global warming was just too brutal.
Global warming is, essentially, an increase in the earth's energy at its surface. With that comes an overall average temperature increase, but the additional energy also results in greater turbulence of the atmosphere, leading to greater variance (swings) in the weather. Expect more wild swings in years to come as GW increases, not less.
 

Plausible Deniability

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Global warming is, essentially, an increase in the earth's energy at its surface. With that comes an overall average temperature increase, but the additional energy also results in greater turbulence of the atmosphere, leading to greater variance (swings) in the weather. Expect more wild swings in years to come as GW increases, not less.
I hear you, brother. Expect the weather to change and to be unpredictable. Got it. Soooo, pretty much the way it's been for the last handful of centuries. Makes perfect sense
 

cncmin

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I hear you, brother. Expect the weather to change and to be unpredictable. Got it. Soooo, pretty much the way it's been for the last handful of centuries. Makes perfect sense
I know. Basic science. So confusing. Amiright or amiright?
 





BarnBurner

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1615216142138.png

Bet you didn't know, most of the parts for a wind turbine are built in Germany, it requires 60 gallons of oil to lubricant the turbine. ( where do you think that oil leaks when a seal busts - onto the ground or into the water).
The blades are made of a toxic fiberglass combination and are buried in landfills in Wyoming.
The turbine has to spin continually for 7 plus years just to replace the energy it took to manufacture the turbine...
It has to run continually for 50 years just to pay for the cost to manufacture and install the turbine....which is approximately $2 million dollars per turbine. However, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the lifespan of wind turbines is only about 20 to 25 years.
 






howeda7

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We had a thread on nuclear versus solar/wind. How do you feel about nuclear?
Let's expand it. The reactors can go in our big empty states to minimize any damage.
 




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