Domestic Terror Attack - Please Post All Possible Charges and Those Charged Here!!!

Gopher_In_NYC

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Take it easy on Les....guys. He doesn't understand homophones like small children. "Too" is such a tricky one....lol.

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Does this mean he’s not “the best poster?”
 

Go4Broke

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January 6 rioter gets nearly four years in prison for assaulting police officer

A Washington state man was sentenced to 46 months in jail for assaulting a police officer with a dangerous weapon in a tunnel at the US Capitol on January 6. During the Capitol riot, Devlyn Thompson helped move police shields up a line of rioters in the tunnel, attempted to throw a speaker at police officers -- which ended up hitting and injuring a fellow rioter -- and eventually hit a police officer in the hand with a metal baton, according to court documents. Thompson, who spent nearly three hours on January 6 at the grounds of the Capitol, pleaded guilty earlier this year.

Judge Royce Lamberth of the federal district court in Washington, DC, said that while Thompson "deserve(d) credit" for his early cooperation, he couldn't "see a justification for going below" sentencing guidelines. The violence that happened that day was such a blatant disregard to the institutions of government," the judge said before handing down the sentence. "You didn't just come up and sock a guy in the face," Lamberth said in reference to Scott Fairlamb, another rioter who received 41 months for punching an officer on January 6. "You're shoving and pushing...and participating in this riot for hours."

 
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bga1

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January 6 rioter gets nearly four years in prison for assaulting police officer

A Washington state man was sentenced to 46 months in jail for assaulting a police officer with a dangerous weapon in a tunnel at the US Capitol on January 6. During the Capitol riot, Devlyn Thompson helped move police shields up a line of rioters in the tunnel, attempted to throw a speaker at police officers -- which ended up hitting and injuring a fellow rioter -- and eventually hit a police officer in the hand with a metal baton, according to court documents. Thompson, who spent nearly three hours on January 6 at the grounds of the Capitol, pleaded guilty earlier this year.

Judge Royce Lamberth of the federal district court in Washington, DC, said that while Thompson "deserve(d) credit" for his early cooperation, he couldn't "see a justification for going below" sentencing guidelines. The violence that happened that day was such a blatant disregard to the institutions of government," the judge said before handing down the sentence. "You didn't just come up and sock a guy in the face," Lamberth said in reference to Scott Fairlamb, another rioter who received 41 months for punching an officer on January 6. "You're shoving and pushing...and participating in this riot for hours."

May 2020 rioter- mostly peacefully protesting, gets big screen TV and a pair of basketball shoes from Target for burning down Minneapolis.
 


saintpaulguy

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May 2020 rioter- mostly peacefully protesting, gets big screen TV and a pair of basketball shoes from Target for burning down Minneapolis.
So the ref owes your team a make up foul?
 



Wally

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Haha, Loony Leftists can't get over the fact the "erection" was nothing more than an unauthorized Capital tour. Very sad.
#LiberalismIsAMentalDisorder

Let's schedule a tour of your house.
 


Go4Broke

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Capitol rioters hit with severe sentences and sharp reprimands from judges

Judges across the US have been handing down stiff sentences and hard words in recent weeks for extremist supporters of Donald Trump who took part in the 6 January insurrection at the US Capitol. Since a federal judge sentenced Jacob Chansley, the US Capitol rioter nicknamed the “QAnon shaman” for his horned headdress, to 41 months in prison last month, more US judges have been delivering strict sentences to defendants charged over their roles in the attacks earlier this year.

Since the riots, federal prosecutors have brought cases against 727 individuals over their involvement in the deadly riots. With hundreds facing criminal charges, Trump has come under growing scrutiny from the House select committee investigating the attacks. The longest sentence so far was handed down to a Florida man who threw a wooden plank and fire extinguisher at police officers during the riots. On 17 December, Judge Tanya Chutkan sentenced Robert Palmer to 63 months of jail time, describing the prison term as “the consequence of those actions”.

According to Chutkan, individuals who attempted to “violently overthrow the government” and “stop the peaceful transition of power” would be met with “absolutely certain punishment”. On Tuesday, a Washington state man was sentenced to 46 months of prison time for assaulting police officers with a speaker and a metal baton during the riots. According to court documents, Devlyn Thompson helped move police shields up against a line of rioters in a tunnel, as well as hit police officers. US District Judge Royce Lamberth told Thompson, “The violence that happened that day was such a blatant disregard to the institutions of government … You’re shoving and pushing … and participating in this riot for hours.” Thompson is the second rioter, after Palmer, to be sentenced for the felony of assaulting a police officer with a dangerous weapon. More than 140 other rioters face the same charge.

“There really is no more serious and profound action democracy takes than the certifying of a lawful and fair election,” Boasberg said. “And to the extent anyone would interfere with that, particularly with force of violence, they strike at the root of democracy,” he added. That message would seem to go for organizers of the 6 January events as well as participants in the violence. On 22 November, US District Judge Royce Lamberth sentenced Capitol rioter Frank Scavo to 60 days in prison, one of the strictest sentences handed down to a misdemeanor defendant and more than four times the prosecutor’s recommendation of two weeks. Scavo, a Trump supporter from Pennsylvania and former school board official, was found guilty of chartering buses to transport approximately 200 residents from Pennsylvania to the Capitol on 6 January.


 
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kg21

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Walking into the capitol unarmed is apparently some damn serious business.
 






saintpaulguy

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Walking into the capitol unarmed is apparently some damn serious business.
I'm sure you would very welcome to appear at the trials and explain how this is no big deal. Think of all the folks you could secure freedom for. If only the judge could hear how you put it.
 


kg21

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I'm sure you would very welcome to appear at the trials and explain how this is no big deal. Think of all the folks you could secure freedom for. If only the judge could hear how you put it.
Could I post riots and insurrections that happened in other states that were no big deal at all as my defense? Oh, not in these looney leftist, kangaroo courts, you say.

So I will pass.
 


saintpaulguy

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Could I post riots and insurrections that happened in other states that were no big deal at all as my defense? Oh, not in these looney leftist, kangaroo courts, you say.

So I will pass.
The "Kenny's mom lets him do it" defense is all yours to invoke. Give it a go.
 





Go4Broke

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Inside the sentences since the Capitol attack


- There are more than 700 people who have been arrested for crimes tied to the assault on the Capitol and investigations are still ongoing, and roughly one-tenth of those — 71 — have been sentenced as of Jan. 1.

- More than 150 people have pleaded guilty for crimes committed on Jan. 6, 2021.

- A little over half of defendants who have pleaded guilty are still awaiting sentencing,
and some of the most serious cases of violence against police officers are still awaiting their fate, so the length of prison time for the most serious offenders may change.

Judges aren't enamored with the low-level plea deals​

- The bulk of the sentences to date have been for relatively low-level offenses. The most common charge pleaded to, by far, is illegally parading or demonstrating in the Capitol, a misdemeanor.

- On several occasions judges have expressed misgivings about whether the actual criminal charge matches the misdeeds of the defendant. Beryl Howell, the D.C. court’s chief judge, in late October said that prosecutors’ approach is “almost schizophrenic” given the cavernous gap between their characterization of the insurrection and the terms of the plea deals they’re negotiating.

“The rioters attacking the Capitol on Jan. 6 were not mere trespassers engaging in protected First Amendment conduct or protests,” Howell said during that sentencing, during which Jack Griffith of Tennessee received three years of probation. “They were not merely disorderly, as countless videos show the mob that attacked the Capitol was violent. Everyone participating in the mob contributed to that violence.”

Prison time is rare — so far

Of the 70-plus people who have been sentenced, fewer than half have received prison time for their actions in the days surrounding the riot. That’s in part because many of those sentenced so far were only convicted of illegally entering the Capitol building, and were not involved in the more violent and destructive aspects related to storming the building. Only seven defendants have been sentenced for felony charges, as of late December.

Among those defendants who are being incarcerated, their stints in prison are often somewhat brief. The median prison sentence to date is 45 days.

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Brandon MillerDecember 15, 2021Parading, demonstrating or picketing in a Capitol buildingNo20 days
Glen CroyNovember 5, 2021Parading, demonstrating or picketing in a Capitol buildingNo14 days (halfway house)
Dona BisseyOctober 12, 2021Parading, demonstrating or picketing in a Capitol buildingNo14 days
John LolosNovember 19, 2021Parading, demonstrating or picketing in a Capitol buildingNo14 days
Stephanie MillerDecember 15, 2021Parading, demonstrating or picketing in a Capitol buildingNo14 days


Judges have shown little tolerance for those who attacked law enforcement

Robert Palmer was sentenced in mid-December to more than five years — 63 months — in prison after he admitted to swinging a pole at police and throwing a fire extinguisher and wooden plank at officers. Palmer’s prison sentence is more than a year-and-a-half longer than any other defendant.

Three others have received prison sentences in excess of 40 months, two of whom — Devlyn Thompson and Scott Fairlamb — also admitted to assaulting officers. The third person with such a sentence was Jacob Chansley, who did not engage in violence but whose visage as the “QAnon shaman” became an indelible symbol of Jan. 6.


Acts of violence, threats have led to some of the lengthiest sentences​

Defendants who've received the longest prison sentences


NameChargesGovernment recommendationSENTENCED: IncarcerationSENTENCED: Probation/supervised releaseJudge
Robert PalmerAssaulting, resisting or impeding officers with a dangerous weapon63 months incarceration; 36 months supervised release; $2,00063 months36 monthsTanya Chutkan
Devlyn ThompsonAssaulting, resisting or impeding officers with a dangerous weapon48 months incarceration; 36 months supervised release; $2,00046 months36 monthsRoyce Lamberth*
Scott FairlambObstructing an official proceeding; Assaulting, resisting or impeding officers44 months incarceration; 36 months supervised release; $2,000 fine41 months36 monthsRoyce Lamberth*
Jacob ChansleyObstructing an official proceeding51 months incarceration; 36 months supervised release; $2,00041 months36 monthsRoyce Lamberth*
Cleveland Meredith, Jr.Interstate communication of threats"Mid-range" of federal guidelines; 36 months supervised release28 months36 monthsAmy Berman Jackson
Troy SmocksInterstate communication of threats"Low end" of federal guidelines; 36 months supervised release14 months36 monthsTanya Chutkan

Note: * Denotes senior status judge


- Another count to watch: felony threat charges. Cleveland Meredith Jr. received a 28-month prison sentence and Troy Smocks was sentenced to 14 months in jail after the two men separately pleaded guilty to that offense.

- Many defendants made menacing or threatening comments on social media and elsewhere in the days around Jan. 6, though prosecutors in both cases argued there were unique factors that distinguished the two men criminally from other rioters.

Judges signal willingness to get tougher — if the government pushes for it​

- Judges have a broad amount of latitude to impose sentences as they see fit. However they typically rely on a combination of standardized guidelines and recommendations solicited from both the prosecution and defense, in addition to their own intuition, to formulate a sentence. For instance, judges can decide not to impose any prison time in spite of the prosecution's request to do so — which has happened in several Jan. 6 criminal cases.

But judges can also go beyond the government’s recommendation and levy an even harsher sentence, though doing so can invite additional scrutiny upon appeal. Many judges prefer to exercise this authority on only the rarest of occasions. During the October sentencing of Maryland man Andrew Bennett, Judge James Boasberg repeatedly pressed prosecutors on why they were not seeking jail time in his case — and indicated he likely would have granted it had they did. “There is a strong argument that anyone who was there that day deserves jail,” Boasberg said. But, “my general policy is not to give more time than the government asks,” he said at another point.


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Stephanie MillerParading, demonstrating or picketing in a Capitol buildingTwo months home confinement; 36 months probation; 60 hours community service14 daysN/AN/A60 hoursTanya Chutkan
Troy SmocksInterstate communication of threats"Low end" of federal guidelines; 36 months supervised release14 months36 monthsN/AN/ATanya Chutkan

Note: * Denotes senior status judge


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Valerie EhrkeSeptember 17, 2021Parading, demonstrating or picketing in a Capitol buildingNo36 months probation; 40 hours community serviceNo36 monthsN/A120 hoursPaul Friedman*Clinton

Notes: Fines do not include $500 restitution or other minor monetary penalties; * Denotes senior status judge; ^ Denotes chief judge

Table: Nick Niedzwiadek / POLITICO Source: Federal court documents


Key

Charges: This list of offenses covers only those a defendant pleaded guilty to, or was found guilty of at trial. The vast majority of defendants were initially charged with additional counts that were either dropped by prosecutors as part of a plea deal or otherwise not part of their conviction.

Incarceration: Unless otherwise noted, sentences included refer to prison time ordered by the presiding judge. This column also notes defendants whose terms were effectively covered by time served in custody while their case was ongoing. (For example, Michael Curzio and Karl Dresch.)

Probation/supervised release: These two categories are functionally similar, though supervised release is typically in conjunction with a prison term. Violating the terms of either can result in additional punishment, including incarceration.

Fines: This column includes financial penalties imposed as part of an individual’s sentence.
Many defendants are being required to pay $500 in restitution for damage done to the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6 as a condition of their misdemeanor plea agreement. This table excludes that charge, as well as other lesser sums. Judges have waived, or declined to impose, fines on some less-affluent defendants during their sentencing.

Community service: Defendants typically have a set period of time to complete this condition.

Government recommendation: A summary of what sentencing terms the government sought ahead of the judge’s determination. The defense files a similar brief that is typically far more lenient than what prosecutors request. Judges are not required to follow the recommendations made by either side, though they typically use them to calibrate a given sentence.

 
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Spaulding!No!

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Just run a query on phones in the building on Jan 6. Then go get those phone owners.
 







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