All Things Right-Wing Hate Crimes in America





Spoofin

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Is the only requirement for a "hate crime in America" now any crime committed against a minority?
 








Section2

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Is Broke even aware that none of these recent videos support his narrative?
 



Go4Broke

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Olympic gold medalist Suni Lee says she was pepper-sprayed in racist attack​

American gymnast and Olympic gold medalist Suni Lee said she was pepper-sprayed in a racist attack last month while out with a group of friends in Los Angeles.

Lee, the first Hmong American to represent the U.S. in the Olympics, told PopSugar she was waiting for a ride when a car drove by with people shouting racial slurs.

According to Lee, who said she was with a group of friends who were all of Asian descent, one of the passengers sprayed her arm with pepper spray before the car drove away.

"I was so mad, but there was nothing I could do or control because they skirted off," Lee told PopSugar as part of a cover story on the gymnast. "I didn't do anything to them, and having the reputation, it's so hard because I didn't want to do anything that could get me into trouble. I just let it happen."

Anti-Asian incidents have risen sharply in the United States since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic. Stop AAPI Hate, a national coalition that became the authority on gathering data on racially motivated attacks related to the pandemic, has received more than 9,000 incident reports from March 19, 2020, through this June.

https://www.espn.com/olympics/story...uni-lee-says-was-pepper-sprayed-racist-attack
 



Section2

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Olympic gold medalist Suni Lee says she was pepper-sprayed in racist attack​

American gymnast and Olympic gold medalist Suni Lee said she was pepper-sprayed in a racist attack last month while out with a group of friends in Los Angeles.

Lee, the first Hmong American to represent the U.S. in the Olympics, told PopSugar she was waiting for a ride when a car drove by with people shouting racial slurs.

According to Lee, who said she was with a group of friends who were all of Asian descent, one of the passengers sprayed her arm with pepper spray before the car drove away.

"I was so mad, but there was nothing I could do or control because they skirted off," Lee told PopSugar as part of a cover story on the gymnast. "I didn't do anything to them, and having the reputation, it's so hard because I didn't want to do anything that could get me into trouble. I just let it happen."

Anti-Asian incidents have risen sharply in the United States since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic. Stop AAPI Hate, a national coalition that became the authority on gathering data on racially motivated attacks related to the pandemic, has received more than 9,000 incident reports from March 19, 2020, through this June.

https://www.espn.com/olympics/story...uni-lee-says-was-pepper-sprayed-racist-attack
Article is missing some relevant information.
 

Go4Broke

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KARE co-anchor Gia Vang fights racism with #VeryAsian campaign


"Sunrise" co-anchor Gia Vang has added fashionista to her duties. The journalist, who joined the KARE morning team in 2019, has helped launch a line of hats, sweatshirts and T-shirts that bear the words "Very Asian." It's part of campaign to fight racism and raise awareness.
The movement started after Michelle Li, an anchor at the NBC affiliate in St. Louis, filed a report on what people eat on New Year's Day. At the end of the segment, she mentioned that she eats dumpling soup, adding: "That's what a lot of Korean people do."

Shortly after the piece aired, a viewer left a voicemail at the station, criticizing Li for being "very Asian" and telling Li to "keep her Korean to herself." Li shared the recording on social media. It has garnered more than 3 million views.
Her followers included Vang, who immediately voiced her support. The two of them, along with Vang's partner, decided to launch a clothing line. Sales began this past Tuesday. Within the first 24 hours, they had 1,300 orders. Items will be available at least through Tuesday at veryasian.us. All proceeds go toward the Asian American Journalists Association.

Vang, one of the highest-profile Hmong-American TV personalities in the country, chatted Thursday by phone about why she stepped forward.

Q: How do you and Michelle know each other?

A: We reached out to each other after the Atlanta shootings in March 2021 in which six Asian women were killed. We've stayed in touch on different things since then. When Michelle posted that voice mail on Instagram, I thought, "Lord" and "Not surprised." I was really hurt along with her. I sent her a message apologizing for what she had to hear. We both wanted to reclaim the words "Very Asian." She said, "Do you think it could be a T-shirt?" I gave her a resounding, "Yes."

Q: Why did you react so strongly to what happened? How could you relate?

A:
Michelle has talked a lot about feeling like the perpetual foreigner. I've felt that way in many instances, like I'm not American or not American enough. Well, the fact is we are American. I feel that very strongly.

Q: Do you think you would have reacted the same way when you were starting off in your career?

A:
I've grown so much in the 13 years I've been doing this. When you first start off, you give so much of yourself to the company and the people you work for that you lose a little bit of your identity. I tried to conform to an ideal of what they wanted from me, a perfect-looking reporter who speaks English very well. I wanted it so if viewers turned their heads away from the screen, they wouldn't even know that I was Asian. I don't have time for that anymore. I'm very proud to be Asian.

Q: Where do you go from here?

A:
Michelle has a million ideas. So do I. Right now, we're thankful for the conversation. But we don't want this just to be a hashtag. We want this to be a movement. This is a beautiful moment, but it needs to be more than just a merch store.

Q: What do you and Michelle have planned once you finally meet in person?

A:
We're going to go on a dumpling tour of some sort.

 

kg21

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Did anything become of that hate crime in Kenosha? I've never seen a story dry up so fast.

Anyone know?
 




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