All Things Prosecutions/Lawsuits V. Citizen Trump

Go4Broke

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Georgia criminal probe into Trump's attempts to overturn 2020 election quietly moves forward​

As Donald Trump returns to Georgia later this month, criminal investigators in the state have been quietly conducting interviews, collecting documents and working to build a line of communication with congressional investigators as they aim to build a case against the former President for his alleged attempts to overturn the state's 2020 election results. Fulton County District Attorney Fani Willis kicked off her investigation with a splash earlier this year, when she fired off a round of letters to Georgia officials asking them to preserve documents related to Trump just a month after she took office.

Willis's probe spans not only the former President's activities, but also a call between Sen. Lindsey Graham and Raffensperger, Rudy Giuliani's false allegations of election fraud before Georgia legislators and the surprise departure of Byung "BJay" Pak from his role as US attorney for the Northern District of Georgia.
A key area of focus has been the Georgia Secretary of State's office, after Trump called officials there following the 2020 election and pressed them to help to investigate his allegations of fraud in the hopes of overturning results showing Joe Biden won the state in November.

https://www.cnn.com/2021/09/17/politics/georgia-probe-trump-election/index.html
 

Go4Broke

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Criminal inquiry into Trump’s Georgia election interference gathers steam

Donald Trump is facing increasing legal scrutiny in the crucial battleground state of Georgia over his attempt to sway the 2020 election there, and that heat is now overlapping with investigations in Congress looking at the former president’s efforts to subvert American democracy.

A criminal investigation into Trump’s 2 January call prodding Georgia’s secretary of state, Brad Raffensperger, to “just find” him 11,780 votes to block Joe Biden’s win in the state is making headway. The Georgia district attorney running the inquiry is now also sharing information with the House committee investigating the 6 January attack on the Capitol in Washington DC.

Meanwhile, a justice department taskforce investigating threats to election officials nationwide has launched inquiries in Georgia, where election officers and workers received death threats or warnings of violence, including some after Trump singled out one official publicly for not backing his baseless fraud claims.

Veteran DoJ officials and prosecutors say the criminal inquiry launched by the Fulton county district attorney, Fani Willis, into Trump’s call to Raffensperger and other efforts Trump made to overturn the Georgia results, seems well grounded, with ample public evidence. Willis has said prosecutors are scrutinizing “potential violations of Georgia law prohibiting the solicitation of election fraud, the making of false statements to state and local governmental bodies, conspiracy, racketeering, violation of oath of office and any involvement in violence or threats related to the election’s administration”.

To further the Georgia inquiry, Willis reportedly has in recent weeks turned to the House select committee looking into the 6 January attack on the Capitol to share documents and information that could assist her work. The district attorney’s progress was underscored by Raffensperger telling the Daily Beast in August that Fulton county investigators had “asked us for documents, they’ve talked to some of our folks, and we’ll cooperate fully”. According to the news outlet, at least four people in Raffensperger’s office have been interviewed, including attorney Ryan Germany and the chief operating officer, Gabriel Sterling.

On another legal front, the FBI has begun interviews in recent weeks with several Georgia election officials about death threats and other dangerous warnings they received in the months after the election from Trump backers suggesting falsely that Georgia officials were involved in election rigging. For instance, Richard Barron, who heads the Fulton county board of elections, told the Guardian he was interviewed by two FBI agents in early September and informed them about two death threats he received, including one in the summer “full of white supremacist language” which warned he would be “served lead”.

https://www.theguardian.com/us-news...-investigations-georgia-election-interference
 


USAF

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Criminal inquiry into Trump’s Georgia election interference gathers steam

Donald Trump is facing increasing legal scrutiny in the crucial battleground state of Georgia over his attempt to sway the 2020 election there, and that heat is now overlapping with investigations in Congress looking at the former president’s efforts to subvert American democracy.

A criminal investigation into Trump’s 2 January call prodding Georgia’s secretary of state, Brad Raffensperger, to “just find” him 11,780 votes to block Joe Biden’s win in the state is making headway. The Georgia district attorney running the inquiry is now also sharing information with the House committee investigating the 6 January attack on the Capitol in Washington DC.

Meanwhile, a justice department taskforce investigating threats to election officials nationwide has launched inquiries in Georgia, where election officers and workers received death threats or warnings of violence, including some after Trump singled out one official publicly for not backing his baseless fraud claims.

Veteran DoJ officials and prosecutors say the criminal inquiry launched by the Fulton county district attorney, Fani Willis, into Trump’s call to Raffensperger and other efforts Trump made to overturn the Georgia results, seems well grounded, with ample public evidence. Willis has said prosecutors are scrutinizing “potential violations of Georgia law prohibiting the solicitation of election fraud, the making of false statements to state and local governmental bodies, conspiracy, racketeering, violation of oath of office and any involvement in violence or threats related to the election’s administration”.

To further the Georgia inquiry, Willis reportedly has in recent weeks turned to the House select committee looking into the 6 January attack on the Capitol to share documents and information that could assist her work. The district attorney’s progress was underscored by Raffensperger telling the Daily Beast in August that Fulton county investigators had “asked us for documents, they’ve talked to some of our folks, and we’ll cooperate fully”. According to the news outlet, at least four people in Raffensperger’s office have been interviewed, including attorney Ryan Germany and the chief operating officer, Gabriel Sterling.

On another legal front, the FBI has begun interviews in recent weeks with several Georgia election officials about death threats and other dangerous warnings they received in the months after the election from Trump backers suggesting falsely that Georgia officials were involved in election rigging. For instance, Richard Barron, who heads the Fulton county board of elections, told the Guardian he was interviewed by two FBI agents in early September and informed them about two death threats he received, including one in the summer “full of white supremacist language” which warned he would be “served lead”.

https://www.theguardian.com/us-news...-investigations-georgia-election-interference
LOCK HIM UP!
 

Ogee Oglethorpe

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Gotta keep hanging onto any distraction imaginable until next year's midterms. 100% critical to keep people diverted from this dumpster fire of an administration.

The question becomes, are people really going to be that stupid? You would think not, but when you pile on election shenanigans, I wouldn't rule out anything at this point.
 


GopherJake

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Gotta keep hanging onto any distraction imaginable until next year's midterms. 100% critical to keep people diverted from this dumpster fire of an administration.

The question becomes, are people really going to be that stupid? You would think not, but when you pile on election shenanigans, I wouldn't rule out anything at this point.
When your guy chooses to continue to photobomb, don’t be surprised if people point out that his warts are ruining the picture. He could fade away, your team could revert to normal people, stop questioning the election and focus on Biden.
 

howeda7

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The R's could have sent Trump into Mitt Romney style purgatory. Instead they went all in on the Big Lie and are still firmly in his embrace. He's all but announced he's running in 2024. He is the GQP and they are him. Anyone whining about that is deliberately ignoring what their own party is doing.
 

stocker08

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When your guy chooses to continue to photobomb, don’t be surprised if people point out that his warts are ruining the picture. He could fade away, your team could revert to normal people, stop questioning the election and focus on Biden.

Bingo. People like Ogee are just angry that people notice that their side backed a total moron.....and are continuing to do so. lol.....he's openly defrauding people with his fundraising as his minions rush head first into the stolen election mirage. but but but but.....the emails.
 







Go4Broke

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Trump faces flurry of investigations beyond Jan. 6 probe

As Donald Trump’s lawyers try to block the White House from releasing records to the congressional committee investigating the Jan. 6 Capitol insurrection, the former president faces a flurry of other investigations that could come to a head in the coming weeks and the new year. That includes two major state criminal investigations — one in New York and one in Georgia — and lawsuits concerning sexual assault allegations, a fight over an inheritance and questions of whether he should be held personally liable for inciting the insurrection.

Trump has long dismissed the investigations as nothing more than a politically motivated “witch hunt” that began with the probe into Russian meddling in the 2016 election. But while Trump has spent most of his life dodging legal consequences, he is no longer shielded by the protections against indictment enjoyed by sitting presidents. And any charges — which would be the first against a former president in the nation’s history — could affect both his businesses and his future political prospects as he mulls running for a second term.

Here’s the latest on where the cases stand:

NEW YORK


New York prosecutors are investigating the former president’s business dealings and recently convened a new grand jury to hear evidence after the previous panel’s term ran out. The Manhattan district attorney’s office is weighing whether to seek more indictments in the case, which resulted in tax fraud charges in July against Trump’s company, the Trump Organization, and its longtime chief financial officer, Allen Weisselberg. They are accused of cheating tax authorities through lucrative, untaxed fringe benefits. Weisselberg is due back in court in July 2022.

Trump himself remains under investigation after District Attorney Cyrus Vance Jr., who is leaving office at the end of the year, spent years fighting to access the former president’s tax records. Prosecutors have also been considering whether to seek charges against the company’s chief operating officer, Matthew Calamari Sr. Investigators working for Vance and New York Attorney General Letitia James have spent more than two years looking at whether the Trump Organization misled banks or tax officials about the value of the company’s assets, inflating them to gain favorable loan terms or minimizing them to reap tax savings. “I think it’s pretty clear that our investigation is active and ongoing,” Vance said Tuesday. James’ office is involved in Vance’s criminal probe and is conducting its own civil investigation.

Separately, Trump is facing scrutiny over properties he owns in the New York City suburbs. Westchester County District Attorney Mimi E. Rocah subpoenaed records from the town of Ossining as it investigates whether Trump’s company misled officials to cut taxes for a golf course there, two people familiar with the probe told The Associated Press on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to speak publicly on the matter.

GEORGIA

In Atlanta, Fulton County District Attorney Fani Willis opened an investigation in January into possible attempts to interfere with the administration of the state’s 2020 election, which Trump narrowly lost. In letters sent in February to top elected officials in the state — including Gov. Brian Kemp and Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger — Willis instructed them to preserve all records related to the election, particularly those that may contain evidence of attempts to influence election officials.

The investigation includes a Jan. 2 phone call between Trump and Raffensperger in which Trump repeatedly and falsely asserts that the Republican secretary of state could change the certified results of the presidential election. A recording of the call was obtained the next day by multiple news organizations, including The Associated Press. “I just want to find 11,780 votes, which is one more than we have,” Trump said. “Because we won the state.”

Willis has been relatively tight-lipped about the investigation, but her office has confirmed it is ongoing. “All available evidence is being analyzed, whether gathered by this office, another investigative body or made public by the witnesses themselves. A decision on whether criminal charges are appropriate against any individual will be made when that process is complete,” spokesperson Jeff DiSantis said in an email. Among the sources sure to be examined by Willis’ team is a book written by Raffensperger and published Nov. 2. It includes a transcript of the Jan. 2 call with Trump annotated with the secretary of state’s observations, including his belief that the president was threatening him at multiple points.

Willis earlier this year said she was also interested in the circumstances surrounding the sudden resignation on Jan. 4 of Bjay Pak, the U.S. attorney in Atlanta. Pak told the Senate Judiciary Committee that he had originally planned to stay in the position until Inauguration Day, Jan. 20, but resigned weeks earlier because of pressure from Trump.

WASHINGTON

The attorney general for the District of Columbia, Karl Racine, said early this year that district prosecutors were investigating Trump’s role in the Jan. 6 insurrection and considering whether to charge him under a local law that criminalizes statements that motivate people to act violently. There has been no indication, however, that that is likely. If Trump were to be charged, it would be a low-level misdemeanor, with a maximum sentence of six months in jail.

LAWSUITS

In addition to the criminal probes underway, Trump also faces a number of civil suits, from scorned business investors, to his estranged niece, to Democratic lawmakers and Capitol Police officers who blame him for inciting the violence on Jan. 6. That includes a lawsuit brought by the House Homeland Security chair, Democratic Rep. Bennie Thompson, under a Reconstruction-era law called the Ku Klux Klan Act of 1871, which prohibits violence or intimidation meant to prevent members of Congress or other federal officials from carrying out their constitutional duties.

In October, Trump was questioned behind closed doors under oath in a deposition for a lawsuit brought by protesters who say his security team assaulted them outside Trump Tower in the early days of his presidential campaign in 2015.

Trump is also facing a defamation case brought by columnist E. Jean Carroll, who says Trump raped her in the mid-1990s in an upscale Manhattan department store. Trump has said that Carroll is “totally lying” and that she is “not my type.” U.S. Justice Department lawyers argued earlier this year that Trump cannot be held personally liable for “crude and disrespectful” remarks he made about a woman who accused him of rape because he made the comments while he was president. The 2nd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals is set to hear oral arguments in the case Friday.

Separately, Trump’s estranged niece, Mary Trump, has sued him and other family members, accusing them of defrauding her of millions of dollars of inheritance money. Trump has filed his own suit against Mary Trump and The New York Times over a 2018 story about his family’s finances that was based partly on confidential documents she provided to the paper. He accuses her of breaching a settlement agreement that barred her from disclosing the documents. Lawyers for Mary Trump filed paperwork Thursday seeking to dismiss her uncle’s lawsuit against her.

https://apnews.com/article/donald-t...apitol-siege-db516ff2c9558fc67b2fe21f17c7708f
 





Ogee Oglethorpe

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Gotta keep the focus away from this dumpster fire of an administration if there is a SLIGHTEST hope of not getting destroyed in the midterms next year. Gotta keep this stuff alive, we have some folks who are easily distracted away from Simple Joe

"You m-m-m-m-make me happy!" "Now you can have ice cream in heaven!"
 


Wally

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Gotta keep the focus away from this dumpster fire of an administration if there is a SLIGHTEST hope of not getting destroyed in the midterms next year. Gotta keep this stuff alive, we have some folks who are easily distracted away from Simple Joe

"You m-m-m-m-make me happy!" "Now you can have ice cream in heaven!"
Righties don't want to hold criminals accountable, who woulda guessed...

I guess you think people can't separate the two. Why do you think Americans are so inept?
 

Spoofin

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The walls are closing in!
Remember when some on here were predicting an arrest within moments of leaving office. I even remember one predicting he would leave office early to go in hiding. CRINGY claimed he committed thousands of crimes while in office. IALTO.
 


USAF

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Remember when some on here were predicting an arrest within moments of leaving office. I even remember one predicting he would leave office early to go in hiding. CRINGY claimed he committed thousands of crimes while in office. IALTO.
Drink!
 



Spoofin

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You can’t make it up. Such a hypocrite.
 

Go4Broke

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Trump suffers big court loss in his bid to keep his tax records secret

A federal judge on Tuesday dealt a blow to former President Donald Trump's bid to keep his tax returns from Congress, ruling that the Treasury Department could disclose them to the House committee that requested them more than two years ago. The decision stems from the case initially brought by House Ways and Means Chairman Richard Neal against the Treasury Department under the Trump administration, when the department rebuffed his request for the returns under a law that allows disclosure of an individual's tax returns to the committee.

With the new administration, the Justice Department changed its posture in the case, and on Tuesday, District Judge Trevor McFadden, a Trump appointee, granted requests from the department and the House to dismiss the case. Following the decision, Neal said in a statement that "this ruling is no surprise, the law is clearly on the Committee's side. I am pleased that we're now one step closer to being able to conduct more thorough oversight of the IRS's mandatory presidential audit program."

In Tuesday's opinion, McFadden said that the former President was "wrong on the law," as a "long line of Supreme Court cases requires great deference to facially valid congressional inquiries." "Even the special solicitude accorded former Presidents does not alter the outcome," McFadden wrote. "It might not be right or wise to publish the returns, but it is the Chairman's right to do so," McFadden wrote. "Congress has granted him this extraordinary power, and courts are loath to second guess congressional motives or duly enacted statutes. The Court will not do so here and thus must dismiss this case."

https://www.cnn.com/2021/12/14/politics/trump-irs-disclosure-tax/index.html
 

Go4Broke

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Trump Organization formally notifies GSA of proposed sale of DC hotel

The Trump Organization has formally notified the General Service Administration about its proposed sale of lease for its hotel in Washington, DC, moving a step closer to offloading the property. "GSA has been formally notified of the proposed transfer and is committed to conducting a thorough review to ensure compliance with all legal and contractual requirements," said a spokeswoman for GSA.

CNN reported last month that the Trump Organization reached a deal to sell the lease for the Old Post Office Building to Miami-based investment group CGI Merchant Group for $375 million. CGI, as part of the deal, reached an operating and branding agreement with Hilton Hotels to run the hotel under the Waldorf-Astoria brand, people familiar with the deal said.

The sale comes as the Trump Organization continues to face scrutiny. The Manhattan district attorney's office is investigating the company and whether it manipulated the value of its properties when securing financing and assessing taxes, CNN has reported. Trump opened the DC hotel in 2016 during his presidential campaign and it has been ensconced in controversy ever since. It drew foreign governments and raised questions about whether the Emoluments Clause of the Constitution had been violated.

It has also been subject to congressional scrutiny. In October, the House Oversight Committee released documents showing the DC property, which attracted conservative lobbyists throughout the Trump presidency, lost $70 million while he was in office. (The former President had publicly claimed the hotel was taking in tens of millions of dollars in revenues.) The company has been trying to sell the property since 2019, but paused last year when the pandemic all but shuttered the hospitality industry.
 

Spoofin

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He’ll be behind bars soon. I’m sure. I was promised right after he leaves office but this will have to do. Thousands of crimes while in office (copyright CRINGY) and still walking around.
 


USAF

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He’ll be behind bars soon. I’m sure. I was promised right after he leaves office but this will have to do. Thousands of crimes while in office (copyright CRINGY) and still walking around.
Huh..."not a Trump voter" spoof rides in with Trump defense for the 1000th time.

Odd.

Almost makes one suspect ... FRAUD!!!!
 





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