All Things Prosecutions/Lawsuits V. Citizen Trump

Go4Broke

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Can America Restore the Rule of Law Without Prosecuting Trump and Suing Him into Bankrupcty?

The stakes of prosecuting Donald Trump may be high; but so are the costs of not prosecuting him, which would send a dangerous message, one that transcends even the presidency, about the country’s commitment to the rule of law.

“This whole presidency has been about someone who thought he was above the law,” Anne Milgram, the former attorney general of New Jersey, told me. “If he isn’t held accountable for possible crimes, then he literally was above the law.”

Financial Crimes

(1) After Trump’s financial struggles in the early 2000s made it more difficult for him to borrow money from established financial institutions, he sought partnerships with private individuals like the Russian oligarch Aras Agalarov, whom Senate investigators have linked to organized crime.

(2) Trump’s real estate training program, Trump University, was essentially a pyramid scheme, encouraging consumers, in particular the elderly, to purchase high-priced seminars for supposedly proprietary investment advice that in fact came from third-party marketing companies.

(3) Trump used money raised by his nonprofit foundation to settle lawsuits against his for-profit businesses (as well as to buy a gigantic painting of himself, which he had hung at one of his golf clubs).

(4) Trump deliberately inflated the value of his assets by hundreds of millions of dollars in order to secure bank loans and cheaper insurance rates, and deflated their value to lower his tax burden.

(5) In 2010, Trump took a $72.9 million tax refund for an abandoned Atlantic City casino venture, which would require him to have received absolutely nothing in return for his investment, and he appears to have grossly overstated the value of several properties in order to claim larger deductions known as conservation easements.

(6) During Trump’s years on “The Apprentice,” he wrote off $70,000 in haircuts as a business expense. He also wrote off the expenses associated with a family compound in Westchester County by classifying it as an investment property, and he paid his daughter Ivanka more than $740,000 in consulting fees when she was an employee of the Trump Organization.

(7) Given Trump’s history of doing business with foreign actors with a demonstrated need to conceal the sources of their income, another one might be money laundering.

Election-Law Violations

(8) Days before the first Republican nominating caucuses, he used his foundation to host a televised fund-raiser for military veterans and then redirected millions of the dollars in donations to his campaign, prompting an investigation by the New York State attorney general, Eric Schneiderman. (The foundation was eventually fined $2 million for the misappropriation of funds and shut down under court supervision.)

(9) When Michael Cohen pleaded guilty to violating two campaign-finance laws in the Southern District of New York, he testified in federal court that Trump directed him to arrange for the hush-money payments. Trump was part of the investigation, but was protected by the Justice Department policy against indicting a sitting president. He was instead named an unindicted co-conspirator in the case — “Individual-1,” as the prosecution’s filings called him.

Obstruction of Justice

(10) The laws governing contributions to inaugural committees are far more forgiving than those governing campaign finance. Nevertheless, Trump’s inaugural committee appears to have broken a number of them. The committee may have violated its nonprofit status by paying more than $1 million to rent event space at Trump’s new Washington hotel — well above market rate and the hotel’s own pricing guidelines — and spending another $300,000 to rent a room in the hotel for a private, after-hours party for Trump’s children.

(11) The inaugural committee’s disclosure report to the Federal Election Commission contained dozens of false entries; it reported, for instance, that Katherine Johnson — the NASA mathematician who was one of the subjects of the movie “Hidden Figures” and was then 98 years old — had contributed $25,000, listing her address as the address for NASA’s research center in Hampton, Va. (Johnson did not contribute to the committee, nor did she reside at NASA.)

(12) The inaugural committee’s activities have already prompted federal prosecutions. The Republican lobbyist Samuel Patten pleaded guilty in 2018 to illegally arranging for a Ukrainian oligarch to purchase four tickets to the inaugural for $50,000. And a venture capitalist in California, Imaad Zuberi, pleaded guilty earlier this year to trying to hide from investigators the source of a portion of the $900,000 contribution he made to the committee.

(13) Just a few months into Trump’s presidency, the news broke that the F.B.I. had begun an investigation into his campaign’s links to Russia. Trump tried to derail it. His first attorney general, Jeff Sessions, had recused himself from the inquiry because he had been involved with the campaign; Trump pressed him to “un-recuse” himself. He also pressed the director of the F.B.I., James Comey, to announce that he wasn’t a target of the investigation and to back off his former national security adviser, Michael Flynn, who pleaded guilty to lying to investigators about a meeting with the Russian ambassador Sergei Kislyak.

(14) Trump eventually fired Comey, which led to the appointment of Mueller as special counsel, and Mueller took over the investigation. Trump soon tried to stop Mueller too, ordering his White House counsel, Donald McGahn, to fire him. When the story of Trump’s order — and McGahn’s refusal to follow it — became public, Trump told McGahn to publicly deny it and ordered him to create a false record to substantiate the lie. (He didn’t.)

(15) As Mueller’s investigation continued and started claiming its first victims, Trump floated the idea of pardoning a potential witness against him — his former campaign manager Manafort, who was convicted of eight felonies and pleaded guilty to two others.

(16) When Mueller’s report was released in the spring of 2019, more than 700 former federal prosecutors from Republican and Democratic administrations signed an open letter stating that if those same acts had been committed by anyone but the president, they would have resulted in multiple felony charges.

Public Corruption

(17) Trump could test still more legal boundaries, leveraging his “unitary” authority over the nation’s foreign affairs for political purposes. For this, he needed the help of a very different sort of lawyer, Rudy Giuliani, who set the scheme in motion. The plan called for holding back from Ukraine $391 million in congressionally approved military aid until the country’s newly elected president, Volodymyr Zelensky, agreed to investigate two debunked conspiracy theories — one casting doubt on Russia’s interference in the 2016 election, the other raising ethical questions about Joe Biden. United States diplomats, including the ambassador to the European Union and the special envoy to Ukraine, were pressed into service to aid in the effort.

Partisan Coercion

(18) As the 2020 election approached, Trump appeared emboldened by his years of presidential unaccountability. Thanks to his self-compounding liability, he was also confronting an increasingly urgent need to retain it. Trump, meanwhile, continued to test the limits of his seemingly limitless authority. He pushed out five inspectors general charged with overseeing the conduct of the executive branch, commuted Stone’s prison sentence and openly defied the authority of the other two branches of government in an effort to stoke his political base.

(19) The Hatch Act has criminal provisions from which the president is not exempt; one is the prohibition against using one’s official authority to influence a federal election. “That’s the very heart of the Hatch Act,” Kathleen Clark, a professor of legal and government ethics at the law school at Washington University in St. Louis, told me. “Public power is for public good, not for private good.” Trump’s flagrant violations of this prohibition were widely noted at the time of the Republican
convention.

U.S. Capitol Insurrection

CLAIM: The FBI has cleared President Donald Trump “of any guilt, any connection” to the Jan. 6 attack on the Capitol.
AP’S ASSESSMENT: False. There is no record of the federal law enforcement agency making such a statement.
THE FACTS: On Wednesday, the U.S. House of Representatives voted to impeach Trump for “incitement of insurrection.” President Donald Trump had urged his supporters to come to Washington on Jan. 6 to protest election results on the day Congress was set to certify Joe Biden as the winner of the 2020 presidential election. At a rally that day, Trump told his supporters, “We fight like hell and if you don’t fight like hell, you’re not going to have a country anymore.” As he was speaking, his supporters began storming the Capitol in what became a deadly siege.

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/11/17/magazine/trump-investigations-criminal-prosecutions.html?action=click&module=Top Stories&pgtype=Homepage

https://apnews.com/article/fact-checking-afs:Content:9920241957
 
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MplsGopher

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What are the most likely cases/crimes that he can be convicted of? Obviously have to be state crimes, he will be pardon of all future federal crimes, one way or another.
 

MennoSota

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Yawn. Obama got off free as did Clinton. The oligarchy does what it wills without recrimination...
 




Go4Broke

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The Senate Acquitted Trump. His Legal Problems Are Just Starting

The Senate acquitted Donald Trump, again, but the former president’s legal worries are far from over. As a private citizen, Trump is no longer protected by the Justice Department’s policy against charging a sitting president with federal crimes. And Trump, his family and businesses, also have to worry about investigations in various local jurisdictions and at least one foreign country, lawsuits he used his presidency to dodge, and probes by congressional committees. Here are some highlights:

Washington, DC:

Prosecutors under Karl Racine, the District’s Attorney General, are considering charging Trump with violating a DC law against encouraging violence, CNN reported Friday.
Racine said last month that prosecutors could charge Trump with “a misdemeanor, a six-month-in-jail maximum,” for inciting the January attack on Congress. Racine has also sued Trump’s 2017 inaugural committee, charging it improperly funneled money to Trump’s DC hotel. That case remains active. Ivanka Trump sat for a deposition in the case in December, and investigators are working to depose Donald Trump, Jr.

Georgia:

Prosecutors in the Peach State have opened a criminal investigation into Trump’s efforts to overturn Georgia’s election results, where Joe Biden narrowly defeated Trump
. Last week, a Democratic prosecutor in Georgia’s Fulton County sent a letter to numerous state officials, requesting that they preserve documents related to “an investigation into attempts to influence” the state’s 2020 presidential election, the New York Times reported. At issue are calls Trump and his allies made, including Trump’s January 2 call to Georgia Secretary of Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger. In that call, which Raffensperger recorded, Trump urged him to “find 11,780 votes,” one more vote than the margin by which Trump lost the state. Raffensperger’s office has also launched its own investigation into Trump’s efforts to pressure Georgia officials.

New York:

New York Attorney General Letitia James is conducting a civil investigation into whether the Trump Organization inflated the values of his assets to win favorable loans and insurance coverage.

Manhattan District Attorney Cy Vance is also looking into loans Trump took out on some of his signature Manhattan properties, the Wall Street Journal reported Saturday.
That’s part of Vance’s wide-ranging probe into what his office has described as “possibly extensive and protracted criminal conduct at the Trump Organization” that could include insurance fraud, tax fraud, or other schemes to avoid taxes and cook the books to win favorable loan terms.

Scotland:

The Scottish Parliament recently voted down a nonbinding measure calling for an anti–money laundering investigation into the finances of two resorts Trump owns in the country. But Trump’s Scottish critics remain suspicious that the properties, in which Trump has invested nearly $300 million without ever showing a profit, have been used to launder funds. The vote does not mean the country’s prosecutors aren’t investigating the money-losing resorts, Mother Jones has reported. Some Scottish officials have said it signals that the parliament wants to keep politics out of any probe into the properties’ finances that may already be underway. Scottish investigators will neither confirm nor deny if an investigation is in progress, leaving it unclear what legal issues Trump faces there.

Lawsuits:

Trump’s two impeachments and other legal problems have distracted from the more than 26 allegations of sexual misconduct he still faces. Trump has denied all of those allegations. In doing so, he opened the door for women who say they are his victims to sue him for defamation.

E. Jean Carroll, a longtime advice columnist who says Trump raped her in a department store dressing room in late 1995 or early 1996, is pressing a such a suit.

Former Apprentice contestant Summer Zervos, who alleges Trump sexually assaulted her in 2007, has also sued him for defamation.

Trump used the powers of the presidency to delay and fight those suits
. He used the Secret Service to help him evade service of a court summons and claimed he was too busy to be deposed. He “claimed presidential immunity in state court, argued that he couldn’t be sued in New York because of his temporary residence in the White House, and had the Department of Justice intervene on his behalf,” Mother Jones has reported. Now those protections are gone. Lawyers for Zervos and Carroll, noting his arguments for delay are rendered moot by his defeat, are pressing judges to let them proceed with their cases.

Congress:

Congressional committees, all run by Democrats, are free to investigate all aspects of Trump’s conduct as president and as a private citizen. Notably, the House Judiciary Committee says it is still fighting to enforce subpoenas it issued in 2019 as part of its probe into Trump’s alleged obstruction of justice aimed at undermining Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation of Trump’s ties to Russia, among other things. That means the panel could still hear testimony about Trump’s alleged criminal conduct as president. And while Mueller declined to charge Trump with obstruction of justice due to a DOJ policy against indicting a sitting president, Merrick Garland’s Justice Department could still file charges against private citizen Trump.

https://www.motherjones.com/mojo-wi...d-trump-his-legal-problems-are-just-starting/
 
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GoodasGold

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I may sue Trump for his being feloniously stupid.
 












STPGopher

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Can America Restore the Rule of Law Without Prosecuting Trump and Suing Him into Bankrupcty?

The stakes of prosecuting Donald Trump may be high; but so are the costs of not prosecuting him, which would send a dangerous message, one that transcends even the presidency, about the country’s commitment to the rule of law.

“This whole presidency has been about someone who thought he was above the law,” Anne Milgram, the former attorney general of New Jersey, told me. “If he isn’t held accountable for possible crimes, then he literally was above the law.”

Financial Crimes

(1) After Trump’s financial struggles in the early 2000s made it more difficult for him to borrow money from established financial institutions, he sought partnerships with private individuals like the Russian oligarch Aras Agalarov, whom Senate investigators have linked to organized crime.

(2) Trump’s real estate training program, Trump University, was essentially a pyramid scheme, encouraging consumers, in particular the elderly, to purchase high-priced seminars for supposedly proprietary investment advice that in fact came from third-party marketing companies.

(3) Trump used money raised by his nonprofit foundation to settle lawsuits against his for-profit businesses (as well as to buy a gigantic painting of himself, which he had hung at one of his golf clubs).

(4) Trump deliberately inflated the value of his assets by hundreds of millions of dollars in order to secure bank loans and cheaper insurance rates, and deflated their value to lower his tax burden.

(5) In 2010, Trump took a $72.9 million tax refund for an abandoned Atlantic City casino venture, which would require him to have received absolutely nothing in return for his investment, and he appears to have grossly overstated the value of several properties in order to claim larger deductions known as conservation easements.

(6) During Trump’s years on “The Apprentice,” he wrote off $70,000 in haircuts as a business expense. He also wrote off the expenses associated with a family compound in Westchester County by classifying it as an investment property, and he paid his daughter Ivanka more than $740,000 in consulting fees when she was an employee of the Trump Organization.

(7) Given Trump’s history of doing business with foreign actors with a demonstrated need to conceal the sources of their income, another one might be money laundering.

Election-Law Violations

(8) Days before the first Republican nominating caucuses, he used his foundation to host a televised fund-raiser for military veterans and then redirected millions of the dollars in donations to his campaign, prompting an investigation by the New York State attorney general, Eric Schneiderman. (The foundation was eventually fined $2 million for the misappropriation of funds and shut down under court supervision.)

(9) When Michael Cohen pleaded guilty to violating two campaign-finance laws in the Southern District of New York, he testified in federal court that Trump directed him to arrange for the hush-money payments. Trump was part of the investigation, but was protected by the Justice Department policy against indicting a sitting president. He was instead named an unindicted co-conspirator in the case — “Individual-1,” as the prosecution’s filings called him.

Obstruction of Justice

(10) The laws governing contributions to inaugural committees are far more forgiving than those governing campaign finance. Nevertheless, Trump’s inaugural committee appears to have broken a number of them. The committee may have violated its nonprofit status by paying more than $1 million to rent event space at Trump’s new Washington hotel — well above market rate and the hotel’s own pricing guidelines — and spending another $300,000 to rent a room in the hotel for a private, after-hours party for Trump’s children.

(11) The inaugural committee’s disclosure report to the Federal Election Commission contained dozens of false entries; it reported, for instance, that Katherine Johnson — the NASA mathematician who was one of the subjects of the movie “Hidden Figures” and was then 98 years old — had contributed $25,000, listing her address as the address for NASA’s research center in Hampton, Va. (Johnson did not contribute to the committee, nor did she reside at NASA.)

(12) The inaugural committee’s activities have already prompted federal prosecutions. The Republican lobbyist Samuel Patten pleaded guilty in 2018 to illegally arranging for a Ukrainian oligarch to purchase four tickets to the inaugural for $50,000. And a venture capitalist in California, Imaad Zuberi, pleaded guilty earlier this year to trying to hide from investigators the source of a portion of the $900,000 contribution he made to the committee.

(13) Just a few months into Trump’s presidency, the news broke that the F.B.I. had begun an investigation into his campaign’s links to Russia. Trump tried to derail it. His first attorney general, Jeff Sessions, had recused himself from the inquiry because he had been involved with the campaign; Trump pressed him to “un-recuse” himself. He also pressed the director of the F.B.I., James Comey, to announce that he wasn’t a target of the investigation and to back off his former national security adviser, Michael Flynn, who pleaded guilty to lying to investigators about a meeting with the Russian ambassador Sergei Kislyak.

(14) Trump eventually fired Comey, which led to the appointment of Mueller as special counsel, and Mueller took over the investigation. Trump soon tried to stop Mueller too, ordering his White House counsel, Donald McGahn, to fire him. When the story of Trump’s order — and McGahn’s refusal to follow it — became public, Trump told McGahn to publicly deny it and ordered him to create a false record to substantiate the lie. (He didn’t.)

(15) As Mueller’s investigation continued and started claiming its first victims, Trump floated the idea of pardoning a potential witness against him — his former campaign manager Manafort, who was convicted of eight felonies and pleaded guilty to two others.

(16) When Mueller’s report was released in the spring of 2019, more than 700 former federal prosecutors from Republican and Democratic administrations signed an open letter stating that if those same acts had been committed by anyone but the president, they would have resulted in multiple felony charges.

Public Corruption

(17) Trump could test still more legal boundaries, leveraging his “unitary” authority over the nation’s foreign affairs for political purposes. For this, he needed the help of a very different sort of lawyer, Rudy Giuliani, who set the scheme in motion. The plan called for holding back from Ukraine $391 million in congressionally approved military aid until the country’s newly elected president, Volodymyr Zelensky, agreed to investigate two debunked conspiracy theories — one casting doubt on Russia’s interference in the 2016 election, the other raising ethical questions about Joe Biden. United States diplomats, including the ambassador to the European Union and the special envoy to Ukraine, were pressed into service to aid in the effort.

Partisan Coercion

(18) As the 2020 election approached, Trump appeared emboldened by his years of presidential unaccountability. Thanks to his self-compounding liability, he was also confronting an increasingly urgent need to retain it. Trump, meanwhile, continued to test the limits of his seemingly limitless authority. He pushed out five inspectors general charged with overseeing the conduct of the executive branch, commuted Stone’s prison sentence and openly defied the authority of the other two branches of government in an effort to stoke his political base.

(19) The Hatch Act has criminal provisions from which the president is not exempt; one is the prohibition against using one’s official authority to influence a federal election. “That’s the very heart of the Hatch Act,” Kathleen Clark, a professor of legal and government ethics at the law school at Washington University in St. Louis, told me. “Public power is for public good, not for private good.” Trump’s flagrant violations of this prohibition were widely noted at the time of the Republican
convention.

U.S. Capitol Insurrection

CLAIM: The FBI has cleared President Donald Trump “of any guilt, any connection” to the Jan. 6 attack on the Capitol.
AP’S ASSESSMENT: False. There is no record of the federal law enforcement agency making such a statement.
THE FACTS: On Wednesday, the U.S. House of Representatives voted to impeach Trump for “incitement of insurrection.” President Donald Trump had urged his supporters to come to Washington on Jan. 6 to protest election results on the day Congress was set to certify Joe Biden as the winner of the 2020 presidential election. At a rally that day, Trump told his supporters, “We fight like hell and if you don’t fight like hell, you’re not going to have a country anymore.” As he was speaking, his supporters began storming the Capitol in what became a deadly siege.

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/11/17/magazine/trump-investigations-criminal-prosecutions.html?action=click&module=Top Stories&pgtype=Homepage

https://apnews.com/article/fact-checking-afs:Content:9920241957
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cncmin

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What are the most likely cases/crimes that he can be convicted of? Obviously have to be state crimes, he will be pardon of all future federal crimes, one way or another.
You really think he's healthy enough to still be alive come the next Republican President? I suppose he could still be around (in prison) in January 2025 after the GOP tries to rig the election in 2024.
 

MplsGopher

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You really think he's healthy enough to still be alive come the next Republican President? I suppose he could still be around (in prison) in January 2025 after the GOP tries to rig the election in 2024.
I made that comment thinking he would pardon himself.

Whatever happened with that? I guess he didn't do it?
 

cncmin

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I made that comment thinking he would pardon himself.

Whatever happened with that? I guess he didn't do it?
Eh, some say he could have done it in private and we wouldn't necessarily know it until he pulls that card. Regardless, he couldn't have pardoned anyone from state crimes, and he's in deep there.
 

Spoofin

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Eh, some say he could have done it in private and we wouldn't necessarily know it until he pulls that card. Regardless, he couldn't have pardoned anyone from state crimes, and he's in deep there.
Yeah! The “secret pardon” talk is back. I’m guessing there are hundreds of them. When the police show up with a warrant just “pull out the secret pardon card” and yell, “not so fast!” Happens all the time. Not bat sh!t crazy at all.
 

WhoFellDownTheGopherHole?

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Yeah! The “secret pardon” talk is back. I’m guessing there are hundreds of them. When the police show up with a warrant just “pull out the secret pardon card” and yell, “not so fast!” Happens all the time. Not bat sh!t crazy at all.

No. It certainly doesn't, which further punctuates how openly criminal Don the Con really is, that we should even be discussing the possibility.
 

Spoofin

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No. It certainly doesn't, which further punctuates how openly criminal Don the Con really is, that we should even be discussing the possibility.
You and a couple wackos “discussing the possibility” only punctuates how wacko you all are. Nothing more.
 

howeda7

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You and a couple wackos “discussing the possibility” only punctuates how wacko you all are. Nothing more.
Are you saying it's not possible to issue a pardon and not disclose it?
 

stocker08

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Are you saying it's not possible to issue a pardon and not disclose it?

King Trump would never do such a thing. He draws the line at coaxing elected officials to change votes totals and organizing coups.

But as long as we are talking about wackos....spoof should give us an update on the Hunter emails and "The Big Guy". This was REALLY big news I've heard. A true bombshell.
 

Spoofin

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Are you saying it's not possible to issue a pardon and not disclose it?
It’s never been done and the validity of one is considered unlikely by most scholars. It is now something for the lefties to try and save face with since the self-pardon and family preemptive pardon nonsense we heard about for months didn’t happen (or did it?).

However, in this case I’m simply flabbergasted that WhoFell says the fact that a few on this board “discussing the possibility” means something significant. When it comes to Trump there is nothing you guys on here haven’t or won’t discuss. No conspiracy is too looney. You guys just can’t let him go. Did you know he committed thousands of crimes while in office? Thousands.
 

Wally

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You and a couple wackos “discussing the possibility” only punctuates how wacko you all are. Nothing more.

Just like how wacko it was to say Don was stoking post election violence right?
🙄🙄🙄
 



Go4Broke

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A federal judge on Tuesday ruled that a nondisclosure agreement (NDA) that employees on former President Trump’s 2016 campaign had to sign is unenforceable. U.S. District Judge Paul Gardephe, a George W. Bush appointee, found that the language of the far-reaching contract was so vague that it was invalid under New York contract law, Politico reports.

“The vagueness and breadth of the provision is such that a Campaign employee would have no way of what may be disclosed, and, accordingly, Campaign employees are not free to speak about anything concerning the Campaign,” Gardephe wrote in his decision. “The non-disclosure provision is thus much broader than what the Campaign asserts is necessary to protect its legitimate interests, and, therefore, is not reasonable.”

Gardephe also found fault in the non-disparagement clause of the agreement, Politico reports, writing that the contract showed the Trump campaign did not operate “in good faith.” “The evidence before the Court instead demonstrates that the Campaign has repeatedly sought to enforce the non-disclosure and non-disparagement provisions to suppress speech that it finds detrimental to its interests,” Gardephe added.

The ruling by Gardephe was issued in a case brought by Jessica Denson, a Hispanic outreach director on Trump’s 2016 campaign. Denson is accusing the campaign of sex discrimination, Politico reports. “I’m overjoyed,” Denson told Politico, regarding Gardephe’s ruling. “This president ... former president spent all four years aspiring to autocracy while claiming that he was champion of freedom and free speech. ... There’s many people out there who have seen cases like mine and were terrified to speak out.”

https://thehill.com/legal/545685-judge-rules-trump-campaigns-nondisclosure-agreement-is-invalid
 
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Go4Broke

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Two Capitol Police officers sue Trump over Jan. 6 insurrection

Two U.S. Capitol Police officers sued former President Trump Tuesday for physical and emotional injuries caused by what they describe as his "wrongful conduct" in inciting the riots on Jan. 6, which killed at least five people.

Driving the news: Officers James Blassingame and Sidney Hemby are seeking damages of at least $75,000 each, along with other punishments they did not specify. It's the first suit filed by law enforcement who defended the Capitol from Trump's supporters.

What they're saying: The two officers, both yearslong veterans of the force, filed their complaint in the federal district court in D.C. Tuesday, arguing Trump "inflamed, encouraged, incited, directed and aided and abetted" the mob that broke into the Capitol.
  • Blassingame alleged that insurrectionists slammed him against a stone column, where he struck his spine and the back of his head and became immobile as they assaulted him with fists and weapons. They repeatedly hurled racial slurs at him during the attack, he said.
  • Hemby said he was also "attacked relentlessly," bleeding from a cut less than an inch from his eye while pinned against a large metal door.
Trump’s claims of fraud immediately following the election encouraged his followers to descend on state capitols and other government buildings throughout the country, often armed, they argued.
  • Despite reports of violence that erupted at pro-Trump protests on Nov. 14 and Dec. 12, Trump continued his rhetoric of "Stop the steal," the complaint reads.
  • The two officers pointed out that users on TheDonald.win said "they understood Trump’s tweet to be 'marching orders.'"
  • The two are acting individually from the Capitol Police Department.
The big picture: Trump was impeached on a single article accusing him of incitement of insurrection, but was ultimately acquitted by the Senate.

1617201898422.png

https://www.axios.com/capitol-riots...ion-f7fa37e4-d9c7-44cd-9477-4f139be830e9.html
 





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