All Things COVID-19 College Football Impact

MplsGopher

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 4, 2017
Messages
27,806
Reaction score
6,898
Points
113
Language evolves. I'm sure there are plenty of things you use when conversing that were considered incorrect/imprecise at one point. Get over yourself.
It's evolving much too fast, now, though.

My grandkids will not be taught emoji's and lazy texting acronyms/slang in class. I will not allow it.
 



swelna

Active member
Joined
Sep 20, 2016
Messages
531
Reaction score
211
Points
43
It's evolving much too fast, now, though.

My grandkids will not be taught emoji's and lazy texting acronyms/slang in class. I will not allow it.
Man, PE must be rubbing off on you from all the arguing because you're starting to sound like him...
 





forever a gopher

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 20, 2008
Messages
1,920
Reaction score
1,071
Points
113
I also don't know for sure, but if it's similar to CAT scans, technically you increase your risk of things like cancer by some amount each time you get one, so something similar might be weighing in on this as well. A "the chance you have myocarditis and the MRI catches it and saves your life is far smaller than the amount getting the scan increases your chance of cancer" type situation. Though, if it were something like that I would expect them to be much more straight forward about it.
There is no radiation involved in an MRI. That's why you hear about athletes getting them like candy. It's not like an x-ray where you get a pretty heavy dose of radiation (although this is usually on a pretty focused area). An x-ray requires lead-lined walls, and that's about it. An MRI, on the other hand requires a lot more intense construction due to the magnetic draw of the MRI, and space requirements are far greater (which increases cost as space = money in a money making venture like a hospital). Both the machines themselves and the construction involved with them are expensive. How they work is that they take image slices of your body, and getting the view setup, operating a very expensive and elaborate machine, and reading them takes more than "pushing a button". Operating an x-ray and MRI are very different. Hence, the cost associated with an MRI and x-ray are subsequently very different.
 




Word

Eats difficult conversations
Joined
Jun 7, 2009
Messages
7,965
Reaction score
2,729
Points
113
Radiation (radio waves, in this case) is indeed involved.
Radiation in the sense of electromagnetic radiation (radio waves), sure, but not ionizing radiation which is what people should be concerned about.


From: https://stanfordhealthcare.org/medical-tests/m/mri/risk-factors.html
Because radiation is not used, there is no risk of exposure to radiation during an MRI procedure. However, due to the use of the strong magnet, MRI cannot be performed on patients with:


  • Implanted pacemakers
  • Intracranial aneurysm clips
  • Cochlear implants
  • Certain prosthetic devices
  • Implanted drug infusion pumps
  • Neurostimulators
  • Bone-growth stimulators
  • Certain intrauterine contraceptive devices; or
  • Any other type of iron-based metal implants.
 

Word

Eats difficult conversations
Joined
Jun 7, 2009
Messages
7,965
Reaction score
2,729
Points
113
Radiation (radio waves, in this case) is indeed involved.
Additionally, radio waves are essentially no risk due to their low energy. You are bathed in them constantly from radio station signal, your cell phone, wifi, etc.
 

MplsGopher

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 4, 2017
Messages
27,806
Reaction score
6,898
Points
113
Yes, I know.

Radiation literally refers to the emission of photons at any frequency.

If the understood medical definition means higher energies than UV, fine.
 




Pompous Elitist

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 18, 2013
Messages
18,140
Reaction score
2,759
Points
113
Modern Minnesota educational institutions cultivate critical thinking skills in which of the following areas:

1. Science
2. “Science”
3. Whatever the hell I want
 

MplsGopher

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 4, 2017
Messages
27,806
Reaction score
6,898
Points
113
Yes PE we know, you're a libertarian and you want government out of schools entirely.

Next.
 

Wally

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 15, 2016
Messages
10,519
Reaction score
4,638
Points
113
It's evolving much too fast, now, though.

My grandkids will not be taught emoji's and lazy texting acronyms/slang in class. I will not allow it.

You will be crabby crazy grandpa...
 


Ope3

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 12, 2008
Messages
2,600
Reaction score
987
Points
113
Did not know where to put this but while I was driving through Northfield yesterday I drove by Carleton's Laird Stadium and they were painting the gridiron lines on the field.

No idea what that means, but it made me smile.
 

PMWinSTP

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 11, 2015
Messages
11,003
Reaction score
1,604
Points
113
Did not know where to put this but while I was driving through Northfield yesterday I drove by Carleton's Laird Stadium and they were painting the gridiron lines on the field.

No idea what that means, but it made me smile.
My guess is it's for the Ultimate team to stay sharp.
 


MplsGopher

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 4, 2017
Messages
27,806
Reaction score
6,898
Points
113
Sweden has isolation as a benefit.

Who wants to travel to Sweden?? Probably few people, even Europeans, and especially when it's cold. Don't think they have famous ski resorts or any reason for tourists to be there in the cold months.


That's why it can work there. Would never be anything near the same in the US, where foreigners constantly travel to, year round.


And the main point is, Sweden still probably only has say 30% of its population with antibodies. I plucked that number out of thin air, but would guess somewhere in that ballpark. Certainly nowhere near 60-70%.

They do not have herd immunity, at this time. In other words, a new outbreak could happen to their population, if the virus got in.

Would guess they're being highly isolationist in who they let into the country, and requiring them to isolate for 14 days, etc. Plus no one really has any reason to go there.


Apples to watermelon. But it always was.



So let's say that no new outbreaks occur in Sweden, for the rest of the year. Then starting in 2021 they start systematically vaccinating their population, who choose to get the vaccine with high percentage. Meaning they're effectively done with new cases and deaths.

The only valid question is then: relative to Norway and Finland, how much economic damage did they sustain, and what percentage of their population died and/or was hospitalized?

At the end of the day, this will be the story of Sweden: they killed more of their people than they had to, and they still suffered the same economic damage as they would have, otherwise.

Not a story to be proud of.
 

Block M

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 11, 2009
Messages
1,513
Reaction score
567
Points
113
NYTimes getting on board, @MplsGopher next?


Many countries have had an outstanding response to Covid -19 (see S. Korea, Ghana and other African countries). Sweden is not one of them.
 

Pompous Elitist

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 18, 2013
Messages
18,140
Reaction score
2,759
Points
113
Many countries have had an outstanding response to Covid -19 (see S. Korea, Ghana and other African countries). Sweden is not one of them.

Ghana (and Africa as a whole) has a life expectancy in the mid to low 60s. They have myriad other problems to worry about.

Likely another year+ to go with this.
 

MplsGopher

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 4, 2017
Messages
27,806
Reaction score
6,898
Points
113
Maybe another year until the virus is eradicated. Vaccines with rigorous, scientific proof will be ready to go by the end of the year. Once I'm vaccinated, I'll be good to go and return to normal life. You all too afraid to get it can live your own lives as you see fit.
 



Livingat45north

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 27, 2013
Messages
5,122
Reaction score
1,856
Points
113
Houston's season so far:

• In July, Houston lost its Sept. 12 trip to Washington State when the Pac-12 eliminated all non-conference games.

• In August, Houston’s Sept. 3 home game with Rice was postponed when the Owls decided not to play until Sept. 26.

• On Sept. 12, Houston and Memphis agreed to postpone their Sept. 18 game because of an outbreak of positive COVID-19 tests at Memphis that forced the Tigers to stop practicing.

• On Sept. 18, a hastily added Sept. 19 game at Baylor to fill the open date was canceled because a coronavirus problem prevented the Bears from meeting the Big 12-established minimum for number of players available at a position group.

• On Sept. 23, the new Sept. 26 home opener was canceled because four North Texas players tested positive for coronavirus, and contract tracing sidelined numerous others.

• Their first game is now scheduled for this Thursday against Tulane -- I think at about the same time Hurricane Delta's front edge starts hitting their coastline.
 

Pompous Elitist

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 18, 2013
Messages
18,140
Reaction score
2,759
Points
113
Probably not.


Amid Developing Science, Does Big Ten's 21-Day COVID Protocol Still Make Sense?
When the Big Ten instituted a 21-day window before players can return from a positive virus test, cardiac screening was the big reason why. Now, cardiologists say that testing may not be needed for many.



...We’re just not seeing a lot of clinically relevant cardiovascular disease [in those athletes],” he continues while speaking on a JAMA podcast interview made available to SI. “This document, although it calls for continued data and more study, makes the case that not all COVID is created equal.”

At the center of the medical paper is the relevance and necessity—or lackthereof—for post-virus cardiac MRI, the most intrusive and expensive of the screening battery. There is “insufficient data” to support the use of cardiac MRIs to screen all athletes, according to the document. In fact, cardiac MRIs can produce what the paper terms as “false positives,” finding pre-COVID abnormalities that could potentially disqualify an athlete and have physicians scrambling over nothing.

James Udelson, the chief of the division of cardiology and director of the Nuclear Cardiology Laboratory at Tufts Medical Center, describes this as “overimaging” a patient. “Early on, there were case reports out of Italy and China of true myocarditis,” he says. “However, later autopsy reports showed that wasn’t the case.”

Jon Drezner, a team physician for the Washington Huskies and one of the most respected sports cardiac specialists in the nation, uses an analogy to describe false positive MRIs. Imagine doctors performed spinal MRIs on 100 50-year-old men who have had no back pain in their lives. About half of those men would show findings of degenerative spine disease. “So how do you interpret that?” Drezner asks.


Ackerman refers to this as “non-specific noise” from MRIs, which is the root of an Ohio State study published in August that raised alarms across college football over myocarditis. “The non-specific nature of that test starts to put more and more people unnecessarily in the penalty box for no good reason,” Ackerman says.

Cardiac MRIs aren’t easy to come by, either. In fact, Penn State’s closest cardiac MRI machine is 90 minutes away in Hershey, Barbour says.

Meanwhile, across the nation, physicians continue to find slim traces of myocarditis, as the JAMA paper notes. In Washington and in the Pac-12, for instance, Drezner says there “a lot of screening happening and not a lot of true cardiac pathology is being found.”


 

Block M

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 11, 2009
Messages
1,513
Reaction score
567
Points
113
Yes, I know.

Radiation literally refers to the emission of photons at any frequency.

If the understood medical definition means higher energies than UV, fine.

Probably not.


Amid Developing Science, Does Big Ten's 21-Day COVID Protocol Still Make Sense?
When the Big Ten instituted a 21-day window before players can return from a positive virus test, cardiac screening was the big reason why. Now, cardiologists say that testing may not be needed for many.



...We’re just not seeing a lot of clinically relevant cardiovascular disease [in those athletes],” he continues while speaking on a JAMA podcast interview made available to SI. “This document, although it calls for continued data and more study, makes the case that not all COVID is created equal.”

At the center of the medical paper is the relevance and necessity—or lackthereof—for post-virus cardiac MRI, the most intrusive and expensive of the screening battery. There is “insufficient data” to support the use of cardiac MRIs to screen all athletes, according to the document. In fact, cardiac MRIs can produce what the paper terms as “false positives,” finding pre-COVID abnormalities that could potentially disqualify an athlete and have physicians scrambling over nothing.

James Udelson, the chief of the division of cardiology and director of the Nuclear Cardiology Laboratory at Tufts Medical Center, describes this as “overimaging” a patient. “Early on, there were case reports out of Italy and China of true myocarditis,” he says. “However, later autopsy reports showed that wasn’t the case.”

Jon Drezner, a team physician for the Washington Huskies and one of the most respected sports cardiac specialists in the nation, uses an analogy to describe false positive MRIs. Imagine doctors performed spinal MRIs on 100 50-year-old men who have had no back pain in their lives. About half of those men would show findings of degenerative spine disease. “So how do you interpret that?” Drezner asks.


Ackerman refers to this as “non-specific noise” from MRIs, which is the root of an Ohio State study published in August that raised alarms across college football over myocarditis. “The non-specific nature of that test starts to put more and more people unnecessarily in the penalty box for no good reason,” Ackerman says.

Cardiac MRIs aren’t easy to come by, either. In fact, Penn State’s closest cardiac MRI machine is 90 minutes away in Hershey, Barbour says.

Meanwhile, across the nation, physicians continue to find slim traces of myocarditis, as the JAMA paper notes. In Washington and in the Pac-12, for instance, Drezner says there “a lot of screening happening and not a lot of true cardiac pathology is being found.”



The cardiac registry seems like overkill. Big 10 should have stuck with its original decision to cancel.
 





Top Bottom